If Ever I See You Again (1978)

PG | 105 mins | Romance | 19 May 1978

Director:

Joe Brooks

Producer:

Joe Brooks

Cinematographer:

Adam Holender

Editor:

Rick Shaine

Production Designer:

Don Gilman
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HISTORY

       The 26 Sep 1974 DV referred to the film by its working title, The Mozart of Madison Avenue, but a few years later, the title was changed to California, as noted in the 26 May 1977 DV.
       An article in the 26 Sep 1974 DV stated that Martin Davidson planned to direct the film, which he had just co-written with producer-writer-director-actor Joe Brooks, and that although no deal had been signed yet, George Litto would produce the picture. Litto’s name is not listed in onscreen credits, however, and Davidson is not credited as director.
       The 20 Dec 1977 HR and 29 Dec 1977 DV announced that If Ever I See You Again had been completed and scored and that Columbia Pictures had acquired domestic distribution rights.
       While the 29 Dec 1977 DV stated that the movie cost $1.45 million, the 18 Apr 1978 DV reported that Brooks raised $1.8 million for the film. Subsequently, Columbia spent $2.5 million to promote the picture, including working with the Pertec Computer Corp. to establish toll-free numbers for lost loves to contact each other, reported DV and the 8 May 1978 LAT.
       If Ever I See You Again was scheduled to open in Los Angeles, CA, 19 May 1978, according to 5 May 1978 HR news item.
       While the 24 May 1978 NYT review found the movie “the treacly stuff-and-nonsense of which greeting cards are made,” and the 17 May 1978 Var described it as ... More Less

       The 26 Sep 1974 DV referred to the film by its working title, The Mozart of Madison Avenue, but a few years later, the title was changed to California, as noted in the 26 May 1977 DV.
       An article in the 26 Sep 1974 DV stated that Martin Davidson planned to direct the film, which he had just co-written with producer-writer-director-actor Joe Brooks, and that although no deal had been signed yet, George Litto would produce the picture. Litto’s name is not listed in onscreen credits, however, and Davidson is not credited as director.
       The 20 Dec 1977 HR and 29 Dec 1977 DV announced that If Ever I See You Again had been completed and scored and that Columbia Pictures had acquired domestic distribution rights.
       While the 29 Dec 1977 DV stated that the movie cost $1.45 million, the 18 Apr 1978 DV reported that Brooks raised $1.8 million for the film. Subsequently, Columbia spent $2.5 million to promote the picture, including working with the Pertec Computer Corp. to establish toll-free numbers for lost loves to contact each other, reported DV and the 8 May 1978 LAT.
       If Ever I See You Again was scheduled to open in Los Angeles, CA, 19 May 1978, according to 5 May 1978 HR news item.
       While the 24 May 1978 NYT review found the movie “the treacly stuff-and-nonsense of which greeting cards are made,” and the 17 May 1978 Var described it as “another high-calorie teenybopper fairy tale,” the 19 May 1978 LAT stated “despite Brooks’ stilted direction, the performances have a nice, natural quality.”
      The following text appears during the end credits: “Flashback sequences filmed on location at Cazenovia College, and Mystic Mountain Ski Lodge, Cazenovia New York.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1974
p. 5.
Daily Variety
26 May 1977
p. 11.
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1977
p. 1.
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1977.
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1978
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1978
p. 3, 11.
Los Angeles Times
8 May 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 May 1978
p. 19.
New Times
12 Jun 1978
p. 27.
New York Times
24 May 1978
p. 19.
Variety
2 Oct 1974
p. 4.
Variety
1 Jun 1977
p. 23.
Variety
17 May 1978
p. 54.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Joe Brooks Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir, East Coast
Asst dir, West Coast
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Unit still photog
Unit still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus comp, arr & cond by
Songs, mus & lyrics by
Mus contractor
Orig soundtrack album
SOUND
Loc sd mixer
Re-rec eng
Eng, A&R Recording Studios
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles & opt eff
MAKEUP
Make-up man
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod coord
Casting
Casting
Casting
Post prod facilities
Spec medical consultant
Exec transportation
Exec transportation
Asst to the dir
Paperback novelization
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color by
SOURCES
SONGS
"If Ever I See You Again," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by Jamie Carr
"When It's Over," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by Jamie Carr
"Come Share My Love," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by The Big Hill Singers
+
SONGS
"If Ever I See You Again," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by Jamie Carr
"When It's Over," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by Jamie Carr
"Come Share My Love," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by The Big Hill Singers
"California," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by The Big Hill Singers
"Something To Sell," music and lyrics by Joe Brooks, performed by Bill Deane.
+
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 May 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 May 1978
New York opening: 24 May 1978
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25239
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the winter of 1966, a young couple frolics on their college campus and at a ski lodge. Twelve years later, composer and widowed father Bob Morrison writes music for television commercials, running the business with his friends, Steve Warner and Mario Marino. After a particularly frustrating day, Bob bemoans to Steve that he is sick of contending with clients who continually misunderstand and undercut his musical vision when he should be composing themes and writing real music, preferably for the movies. Later, Bob visits his college friend, David Miller, a fellow musician, and they tease each other about Bob being a successful “sellout” while David is preparing to play his first piano concert at Carnegie Hall, despite his financial struggles. That evening, Bob and Steve discuss a recently published article proclaiming Bob “the Mozart of Madison Avenue” and reminisce about their past. Bob hopes Jennifer Corly, the girl he loved in college and the only person for whom he ever composed a song, reads the article and regrets breaking his heart. Bob still thinks about Jennifer and recalls the moment in school when, after they spent one terrific day and night together, she explained she was not ready for a serious relationship. The next day, Bob and Mario fly from New York City to Los Angeles, California. Upon landing, Bob runs into an old college classmate who mentions that Jennifer lives nearby in Malibu Beach. Bob and Mario proceed to their meeting with a pair of movie producers, Sosnick and Foster, who inform Bob he is in contention with two other composers to score their latest film, a love ... +


In the winter of 1966, a young couple frolics on their college campus and at a ski lodge. Twelve years later, composer and widowed father Bob Morrison writes music for television commercials, running the business with his friends, Steve Warner and Mario Marino. After a particularly frustrating day, Bob bemoans to Steve that he is sick of contending with clients who continually misunderstand and undercut his musical vision when he should be composing themes and writing real music, preferably for the movies. Later, Bob visits his college friend, David Miller, a fellow musician, and they tease each other about Bob being a successful “sellout” while David is preparing to play his first piano concert at Carnegie Hall, despite his financial struggles. That evening, Bob and Steve discuss a recently published article proclaiming Bob “the Mozart of Madison Avenue” and reminisce about their past. Bob hopes Jennifer Corly, the girl he loved in college and the only person for whom he ever composed a song, reads the article and regrets breaking his heart. Bob still thinks about Jennifer and recalls the moment in school when, after they spent one terrific day and night together, she explained she was not ready for a serious relationship. The next day, Bob and Mario fly from New York City to Los Angeles, California. Upon landing, Bob runs into an old college classmate who mentions that Jennifer lives nearby in Malibu Beach. Bob and Mario proceed to their meeting with a pair of movie producers, Sosnick and Foster, who inform Bob he is in contention with two other composers to score their latest film, a love story that will need dramatic, romantic music. When Mario departs to take care of some business, Bob contacts Jennifer and she invites him over for the afternoon. Bob drives to her home in Malibu and discovers that Jennifer followed her desire to become a painter. After they catch up, Jennifer drives Bob back to the airport and gives him a passionate kiss goodbye. Back in New York City, after dealing with annoying clients again and attending David’s piano concert, Bob tells Steve he wants to leave the television commercial business and focus on the opportunity to score films. Steve agrees to dissolve their partnership but the two men are conflicted about the best way to tell Mario. Bob meets Mario at a bar but before he can tell his friend about the dissolution of the business, Mario thanks Bob for being so good to him over the years and gives him a present; Bob finds he cannot give Mario the bad news. Later, Bob learns that producers Sosnick and Foster want to hear his idea for their movie score, but they insist that he work in California. Although Bob does not want to leave New York City, Steve explains Bob may have to move to Los Angeles because that is where the movies are made. Once he returns to Los Angeles, Bob invites Jennifer to the recording studio to listen to his composition but she declines. At the studio, Mario surprises Bob with the session’s piano player, his friend, David Miller, who explains he is glad to collaborate with Bob. The rehearsal gets underway but is interrupted by the arrival of Jennifer, who changed her mind about coming to visit. After the recording session, Jennifer accompanies Bob to dinner and when she expresses how much she loves his song, he admits that he wrote it for her when they were in college. After dinner, Jennifer and Bob go back to her house and she invites him to stay the night, but warns him that she is not capable of making a commitment. Undeterred, Bob spends the next couple of days with Jennifer and by the end, hopes she is finally ready to be with him permanently. Jennifer admits she loves Bob, but as she drops him off at his hotel, she reiterates her stance. Bob protests that if Jennifer gives up what the two of them have, she will regret it for the rest of her life. As Jennifer drives away, Mario approaches Bob with the news that Sosnick and Foster have selected him to score their movie and no longer require him to move to Los Angeles; he can write the music from New York. Bob returns to the East Coast and tries to stop thinking about Jennifer. David visits Bob and notes that while he is happy to be on tour, he is sad that the travel schedule means he will miss spending Christmas with his family and friends. Bob explains that is the nature of success. Later, on Christmas Day, Bob hands out presents to his children as the doorbell rings. Jennifer enters and Bob crosses the room to kiss her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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