Ragtime (1981)

PG | 155 mins | Drama | 20 November 1981

Full page view
HISTORY

The following note of appreciation appears at the end of the film: “The Producers would like to thank The Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, New York City and the New York City Police Department, Movie-TV Unit for all their kind co-operation during the making of this film.”
       A 6 Dec 1975 LAT news item reported that many people vied for roles in the film including “Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen,” who expressed interest in “the role of [Younger Brother], the budding anarchist,” and “Redd Foxx and Muhammad Ali…added to the list (O.J. Simpson among others) of those interested in playing Coalhouse Walker.”
       According to a 7 May 1980 NYT article, Ragtime began filming five years after De Laurentiis bought the film rights for $250,000 in 1975.
       On 5 Apr 1976, New York magazine reported that frequent Robert Altman collaborator Joan Tewkesbury’s first draft of the screenplay was rejected by Altman, who was attached as director at the time, and novelist E. L. Doctorow. Although Altman and Doctorow had similar ideas about the movie’s structure, Tewkesbury’s concept centered on Mother’s journey. Consequently, Tewkesbury was pulled off the project.
       A 1981 Paramount Pictures production information handbook from AMPAS library files described the film’s twenty-week shooting schedule as split evenly between the U.S. and London, England. The cast and crew spent ten days filming on the Lower East Side in New York City and another few days in uptown Manhattan. Later, seven weeks of filming continued in the following locations: Westchester, NY, Connecticut and along the New Jersey shore. The biggest sets in the film ...

More Less

The following note of appreciation appears at the end of the film: “The Producers would like to thank The Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, New York City and the New York City Police Department, Movie-TV Unit for all their kind co-operation during the making of this film.”
       A 6 Dec 1975 LAT news item reported that many people vied for roles in the film including “Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen,” who expressed interest in “the role of [Younger Brother], the budding anarchist,” and “Redd Foxx and Muhammad Ali…added to the list (O.J. Simpson among others) of those interested in playing Coalhouse Walker.”
       According to a 7 May 1980 NYT article, Ragtime began filming five years after De Laurentiis bought the film rights for $250,000 in 1975.
       On 5 Apr 1976, New York magazine reported that frequent Robert Altman collaborator Joan Tewkesbury’s first draft of the screenplay was rejected by Altman, who was attached as director at the time, and novelist E. L. Doctorow. Although Altman and Doctorow had similar ideas about the movie’s structure, Tewkesbury’s concept centered on Mother’s journey. Consequently, Tewkesbury was pulled off the project.
       A 1981 Paramount Pictures production information handbook from AMPAS library files described the film’s twenty-week shooting schedule as split evenly between the U.S. and London, England. The cast and crew spent ten days filming on the Lower East Side in New York City and another few days in uptown Manhattan. Later, seven weeks of filming continued in the following locations: Westchester, NY, Connecticut and along the New Jersey shore. The biggest sets in the film were built at Shepperton Studios in London, including: “A six and a half acre stretch of Madison Avenue circa 1900 on both sides of the 36th Street intersection [that] was meticulously reproduced, complete with tram lines, every detail matched from period blueprints,” and “the formal façade and lush interiors of the J. P. Morgan Library.” A 2 Nov 1980 LAT article stated that St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, NY, was the location for Sarah’s funeral scene.
       As stated in a 18 Nov 1981 LAHExam article, the $32-million budgeted Ragtime was adapted from E. L. Doctorow’s popular source novel of the same name that won the National Book Critics Award and appeared on many “year-end 10-best lists.” Bantam Books paid a record $1.8 million for paperback rights and made its money back once four million copies were sold. The company sold an additional one million copies and printed another half-million copies to coincide with the film’s release.
       A Nov 1981 Vogue article noted that Ragtime was a film “about connection: the connection between private events and public ones.” While the novel was full of asides from history, the convention was not repeated in the movie, though, “newsreels [were] inserted into the film, showing the main characters taking their part in public events.”
       According to the production information handbook, producer Dino De Laurentiis bought the film rights in 1975 and Altman became attached to the project the same year. However, the two men fought over the final edit of Buffalo Bill and the Indians or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976, see entry), and Altman was subsequently fired from Ragtime .
       A 7 May 1980 NYT article stated that Ragtime began filming four years after De Laurentiis’ firing of Altman. Its long road to the screen was hampered by the difficulty of condensing the complex 270-page novel into a two-hour film. Originally, the film was set up at Columbia Pictures with a $10 million budget only to be dropped from the roster when President David Begelman was fired amid “an enforced leave of absence” in 1977. Altman, whose vision of Ragtime was two three-hour movies, was hired, and later fired. Next, De Laurentiis hired E. L. Doctorow, the writer of the novel, whose lengthy screenplay was rejected for a more streamlined script written by Michael Weller.
       The production information handbook noted that when director Milos Forman replaced Altman, he had to start from scratch when an almost 1,000-page screenplay written by Doctorow was deemed unacceptable. Forman streamlined the story by deleting many famous figures such as Henry Ford and Sigmund Freud.
       A 12 Dec 1981 NYT article noted that stage and television actress Mariclare Costello’s portrayal of radical feminist “Emma Goldman” was cut from the final version of the film. Forman wanted the scenes left intact, but he was overruled. In the novel, her character was the prism through which class structure could be understood and her presence was “absolutely necessary. In the film, we see the class structure with our own eyes,” said Mr. Forman.
       The 18 Nov 1981 LAHExam article stated that Forman was so intent on getting “the right look of the people,” especially for characters with brief screen time, he auditioned 1,500 actors. His preference for casting lesser known actors reflected his desire to convey characters with vitality that were in the prime of their lives.
       A Dec 1981 Saturday Review article mentioned that actor James Cagney was lured back to the screen after a twenty-year retirement that began in 1960 after the completion of One, Two, Three (1961, see entry), and even bouts of sciatica and diabetes didn’t stop the actor from showing interest in Ragtime. Cagney knew Forman socially, and even though Forman gave the eighty-two-year-old Cagney his choice of roles, Cagney let the director have the last word when he cast the actor as “New York Police Commissioner Rheinlander Waldo.”
       As stated in a 28 Jul 1980 NYT article, art director Patrizia Von Brandenstein noted that carpenters and painters transformed East 11th Street between Avenues A and B into the setting for Evelyn’s encounter with the street silhouette artist “Tateh” on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. A combination of existing period architecture and moderate commercial activity led the production to choose this location over the more familiar and busier Orchard Street. Storefronts with Hebrew writing replaced existing signage in Spanish that reflected the neighborhood’s demographic at the time. The production agreed to donate “$5,000 to a community-sponsored project” that was to be decided, as well as the usual compensation made to area property owners. Other accommodations included garage parking for contemporary cars that would normally park on the street and a temporary “Ragtime Summer Camp,” located behind Kalish’s Shoestore, for over forty children who could not play on the street as per usual during filming. Location manager Richard Brick noted that one address on the street was returned to its original function as a livery stable to comfortably house the production’s fifteen horses. A representative from The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, A.S.P.C.A., inspected the stable.
       A 28 Aug 1980NYT article reported that Von Brandenstein spent three months converting a fifteen-room Victorian home in Mount Kisco, NY, to be the setting for the film’s archetypical middle-class family. Porches were rebuilt, a driveway was graveled over, an antique kitchen was installed, hand blocked period wallpaper was hung and a gazebo was added to the garden to create the turn-of-the-century ambiance. The production rented the home for a fee of $20,000 for a three-week shoot, installing $40,000 of permanent improvements and removing any that the homeowners did not like.
       A Nov 1981 Vogue article noted that in her research about her character “Evelyn Nesbit,” actress Elizabeth McGovern had heard stories about her from a friend of her mother’s, who knew Nesbit at the end of her life. “She learned very young that her beauty was the way to put food on the table. She was fifteen when she got involved with Stanford White, who was a father figure to her, as well as being the man who made her a woman,” recalled McGovern.
       A 30 Nov 1981 HR article stated that Paramount created a second print advertising campaign to attract black audiences. The poster pictured Howard E. Rollins, Moses Gunn, Debbie Allen and James Cagney with the following copy: “A black man said ‘Respect me or kill me!’ They took away Coalhouse’s wife, child and pride. He made them pay in a way America will never forget. It was a tough time…it was Ragtime.”
       On 8 Dec 1981, the LAHExam reported that the movie earned $594,893 since its release. An earlier 1 Dec 1981 LAHExam article reported that its first weekend, the movie made $151,444. Over the Thanksgiving weekend, the film earned $160,884 in four cities – New York, San Francisco, CA, Toronto, Canada and Los Angeles, CA – spread among five theaters.
       A 17 Jan 1982 LAT Calendar article noted that composer Randy Newman’s original score evoked the mood of the film’s time period without using music original to the era. Most original recordings were deemed “too tinny or scratchy” to be useful and extensive research would have been necessary to track down recordings in mint condition so Newman rose to the challenge of recreating popular music from the early 1900s.
       A 6 Aug 1982 Var news item stated that “Ragtime” was one of thirty theatrical features that entered into an interim agreement with the Screen Actors Guild to avoid a production shutdown imposed by a strike.
       The film received the following Academy Award nominations: Howard E. Rollins, Jr. for Actor in a Supporting Role; Elizabeth McGovern for Actress in a Supporting Role; John Graysmark, Patrizia Von Brandenstein, Anthony Reading (art direction), and George De Titta, Sr., George De Titta, Jr., Peter Howitt (set decoration) for Art Direction; Miroslav Ondricek for Cinematography; Michael Weller for Writing (best screenplay adaptation); Music (Original Score) and Music (Original Song).

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1980
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1981
p. 3, 4
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 1981
---
LAHExam
18 Nov 1981
Section B, p.1, 4-5
LAHExam
1 Dec 1981
---
LAHExam
8 Dec 1981
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Dec 1975
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Nov 1980
Calendar section, p. 33
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1981
p. 29
Los Angeles Times
17 Jan 1982
Calendar section, p.67
New York
5 Apr 1976
---
New York Times
7 May 1980
---
New York Times
28 Jul 1980
Section C, p. 12
New York Times
28 Aug 1980
Section C, p.1, 6
New York Times
20 Nov 1981
p. 10
New York Times
12 Dec 1981
---
Saturday Review
Dec 1981
p. 17
Variety
18 Nov 1981
p. 14
Variety
6 Aug 1982
---
Vogue
Nov 1981
pp. 441-442, 492
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring -- in alphabetical order
as
Starring
as
Starring
as
Starring
as
Starring
as
Starring
as
Starring
as
Al Matthews
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Dino De Laurentiis Presents
A Milos Forman Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr, USA
1st asst dir
2d asst dir, USA
Prod mgr, UK
2d asst dir, UK
2d asst dir, UK
2d asst dir, UK
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based on the novel by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer elec, USA
Gaffer elec, UK
Key grip
Cam asst, USA
Cam asst, UK
2d cam op, USA
2d cam op, UK
Spec photog
Still cam
Still cam, USA
Charles D. Staffell
Process photog
Cam grip, UK
Filmed in
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, UK
Asst art dir, USA
Asst art dir, USA
Asst art dir, UK
Asst art dir, UK
FILM EDITORS
Film ed, UK
Film ed, UK
Film ed, USA
Assoc ed, USA
Asst ed, USA
Asst ed, USA
Asst ed, UK
Asst ed, UK
Asst ed, UK
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, USA
Set dec, USA
Set dec, UK
Prop master
Const mgr, UK
Const mgr, USA
Prop master, UK
Prop buyer, UK
Scenic artist, USA
Scenic artist, UK
Head const grip, USA
COSTUMES
Asst cost des, USA
Asst cost des, USA
Ward supv, USA
Ward supv, UK
Ward asst, UK
Ward asst, USA
Ward asst, UK
MUSIC
Music coach to Mr. Rollins
Orch
Mus rec at
Los Angeles, California
Mus ed
Mus consultant
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op, USA
Boom op, UK
Boom op, UK
Dubbing mixer
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv, USA
Spec eff supv, UK
Main & end titles prod and des by
New York City
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist, USA
Makeup artist, USA
Makeup artist, UK
Makeup artist, UK
Hairdresser, USA
Hairdresser, USA
Hairdresser, UK
Hairdresser, UK
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting, USA
Casting, UK
Scr supv
Post prod coord, USA
Loc mgr, USA
Loc mgr, UK
Prod coord
Prod office coord, USA
Prod secy, UK
Loc coord, USA
Loc coord, USA
Loc coord, USA
Loc coord, USA
Loc coord, USA
Loc coord, USA
Asst to Mr. Cagney
Asst to Mr. Forman
Consultant to Mr. Forman
Supv accountant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant, NY
Researcher
Casting assoc, USA
Unit pub
Pub asst
Transport capt, USA
Transport capt, UK
STAND INS
Vic Magnotta
Stunt coord, USA
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Ragtime by E. L. Doctorow (New York, 1975).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"One More Hour," words & music by Randy Newman, sung by Jennifer Warnes
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 November 1981
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 20 Nov 1981
Production Date:
4 Aug 1980 -- mid Dec. 1980
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Sunley Holdings, Ltd.
2 April 1982
PA133683
Physical Properties:
Color
Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
155
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26494
SYNOPSIS

Pianist Coalhouse Walker Jr. plays ragtime tunes to a silent newsreel that announces the installation of a nude statue by architect Stanford White on the roof of Madison Square Tower in New York City. Former chorus girl and White’s girlfriend, Evelyn Nesbit Thaw, denies in the press that she is the model for the statue. At a lavish party hosted by White, Harry K. Thaw, Evelyn’s husband, barges in and demands the statue’s removal but he backs down and leaves when Stanford introduces him to a guest, New York Police Commissioner Rheinlander Waldo. Meanwhile, a Victorian house in New Rochelle, NY, owned by Father and Mother, a turn-of-the-century middle class couple, is the scene of a sudden mystery. Brigit, the couple’s maid, discovers an orphaned black infant left in the garden. Soon after, the police find Sarah, a young black woman, who is the mother. In the Thaws’ plush living room, Harry tells his lawyers that the statue is a humiliation to him and his wife and the couple wants the statue removed. When the lawyers say there is no legal recourse, Harry is adamant that they find a way. At a live musical performance at Madison Square Garden, Harry shoots Stanford in the head when the architect ignores him, promptly turns over the gun to the police and is arrested. Newsreels show Harry’s mother returning to America for her son’s trial. The Thaw lawyers interview Evelyn to build a defense for her husband. They cut a deal with Evelyn: if she lies on the stand, protects her husband’s reputation and agrees to a divorce, the family will pay her $1 million. Evelyn agrees to the terms. Mother’s ...

More Less

Pianist Coalhouse Walker Jr. plays ragtime tunes to a silent newsreel that announces the installation of a nude statue by architect Stanford White on the roof of Madison Square Tower in New York City. Former chorus girl and White’s girlfriend, Evelyn Nesbit Thaw, denies in the press that she is the model for the statue. At a lavish party hosted by White, Harry K. Thaw, Evelyn’s husband, barges in and demands the statue’s removal but he backs down and leaves when Stanford introduces him to a guest, New York Police Commissioner Rheinlander Waldo. Meanwhile, a Victorian house in New Rochelle, NY, owned by Father and Mother, a turn-of-the-century middle class couple, is the scene of a sudden mystery. Brigit, the couple’s maid, discovers an orphaned black infant left in the garden. Soon after, the police find Sarah, a young black woman, who is the mother. In the Thaws’ plush living room, Harry tells his lawyers that the statue is a humiliation to him and his wife and the couple wants the statue removed. When the lawyers say there is no legal recourse, Harry is adamant that they find a way. At a live musical performance at Madison Square Garden, Harry shoots Stanford in the head when the architect ignores him, promptly turns over the gun to the police and is arrested. Newsreels show Harry’s mother returning to America for her son’s trial. The Thaw lawyers interview Evelyn to build a defense for her husband. They cut a deal with Evelyn: if she lies on the stand, protects her husband’s reputation and agrees to a divorce, the family will pay her $1 million. Evelyn agrees to the terms. Mother’s sibling, Younger Brother, a bachelor who lives with her and works for her husband’s fireworks company, attends the trial. He becomes obsessed with Evelyn and follows her after the trial’s end. He observes her sitting for a portrait by Tateh, a silhouette street artist on the Lower East Side, when a dead horse in the street blocks her car. Evelyn and Younger Brother watch as a fight breaks out in the street between the artist and his wife. In a music club, Coalhouse finds steady work as a piano player in a traveling band, the Clef Club Band. Evelyn returns to the Lower East Side apartment to give Tateh’s daughter a beautiful doll but the street artist and his daughter have left town to start a new life. Younger Brother, who has followed her there, awkwardly asks her for a date that leads to a three-day adventure. At home, Father, his brother-in-law, wonders why he doesn’t call or show up to work. As Father and Mother sit down to dinner, a well-dressed Coalhouse comes calling and asks to speak with Sarah, the baby’s mother, who is temporarily living with the couple. Sarah refuses to speak with him and when Father gives Coalhouse the message, Coalhouse reveals that he is the father. He leaves without speaking to Sarah but says he will return. In a courtroom, the jury finds Harry not guilty of murder but declares him insane, and he is sentenced to an asylum for the criminally insane. A team of show business managers court Evelyn with plans to rekindle her career. Younger Brother questions her return to show business as she strips naked and tackles him on her living room sofa. The Thaw family lawyers appear out of nowhere with a legal document for her to sign, saying the family will pay her $25,000, not the $1 million she was promised, because Thaw’s mother is suing her on grounds of adultery. Younger Brother offers his company lawyers to help her, but Evelyn signs the document to completely sever her ties to Harry. Younger Brother asks Evelyn to come to dinner to meet Father, but she doesn’t show up. When Coalhouse returns to ask Sarah for her forgiveness, Father presses him to explain his intentions. Meanwhile, Younger Brother wants to know what kind of music Coalhouse plays. The musician plays a slow ragtime tune that melts away the family’s fears about him. Before he leaves, he invites the family to be guests at his wedding to Sarah the following Sunday. When Younger Brother interrupts Evelyn’s dance rehearsal to ask where she’s been, he becomes agitated when her managers kick him out. As Coalhouse leaves town in his new Model T, he gets trapped between two pieces of fire equipment in front of the fire station. The firemen tell him he can’t pass until he pays a toll of $25, saying they want a new fire engine as nice as Coalhouse’s car. After leaving his car, Coalhouse returns with a police officer to settle the matter, but the fire equipment is back in the firehouse and his car has been moved down the street where the front seat has been covered in manure. Willie Conklin, the fire chief, says that the musician purposely blocked the firehouse and he has witnesses to prove it. Coalhouse calls him a liar and won’t leave until the firemen clean his car. When his request is denied, he is arrested. Father pays his bail at the station, and when they retrieve Coalhouse’s car, it has more damage. Later, the musician talks to an attorney who tells him it is best to forget what happened. The police tell Coalhouse he can’t sue a volunteer fire department and they send him to the county clerk, who sends him back to the police. When Father fails to persuade Sarah to sway Coalhouse to drop his quest for justice, Father tells her that if Coalhouse marries her as promised, he’ll pay to have the car repaired and cleaned. She laments that Coalhouse will only be satisfied if the fire department repairs his car. When Father tells her the problem is her responsibility, Sarah dresses in her Sunday best to meet the campaign train of Vice President Charles Fairbanks. However, she is beaten to death before she can ask for help, and is buried in her wedding dress. Later, firemen are targeted and killed by several masked men looking for Conklin. At the police station, the chief inspector reads a letter of intent from Coalhouse to Conklin, which says that the violence against the fire department will continue unless Coalhouse’s car is returned in its original state. A police officer guards Father and Mother’s house in case Coalhouse comes for his baby. Younger Brother finds Coalhouse in hiding with a gang and offers materials from his fireworks company to help them make bombs. When a bomb goes off in another fire station, the press descends on Father and Mother’s home. The couple escapes to Atlantic City to avoid questioning. Coalhouse’s next act of violence is to take over the J. P. Morgan library with his gang and use it as a bargaining chip for the return of his car. Police officers surround the library, waiting for orders, and Vernon Elliott, the curator, warns them not to harm the contents of the library. Police Commissioner Waldo grabs a megaphone and wants to negotiate with Coalhouse, but instead a silver goblet is tossed onto the street with a note containing the curator’s office telephone number. Coalhouse makes his demands over the phone, telling Waldo he wants his car returned in its original condition and Fire Chief Willie Conklin turned over to him within forty-eight hours. Waldo summons Booker T. Washington, a black leader, to negotiate with Coalhouse, but he is unsuccessful in getting Coalhouse to drop his demands. Waldo’s men travel to Atlantic City with orders to take Coalhouse’s baby from Mother and Father, but Mother refuses to give up the baby without a proper explanation. Father says he plans to leave with or without the baby, while his wife begs him not to go. In the city, Conklin is taken into custody in his bedclothes when officers break into an apartment and find him hiding under a bed. Within a few minutes, Conklin tells Coalhouse by phone that they should work things out, calls him a “crazy nigger,” and screams that the whole incident was a joke. Coalhouse only wants speak to Waldo and tells him to send Conklin to the library. Conklin gets a reprieve when Father arrives and tells Waldo that he’ll talk to Coalhouse in the library even though the police can’t protect him. In the library, Younger Brother is part of Coalhouse’s gang. The musician tells Father if the commissioner returns his car in pristine condition for his gang’s getaway and he’s sure that they are safe, he’ll surrender. When told of his terms, the commissioner reasons that once the men are safe, Coalhouse can blow up the library. The only freedom he has is the way he dies. Waldo doesn’t believe Coalhouse will be true to his word but Father convinces him that Coalhouse has integrity. Waldo accepts the new terms and Father agrees to stay in the library until Coalhouse surrenders. The Model T pulls up to the library gates. On the darkened street, the men put on their hoods, and prepare to escape; however, they are not prepared to leave Coalhouse behind. Coalhouse tells them they are anonymous, but the police know him and he will be hunted down like a dog everyday of his life. If they escape, they can tell the story of what happened and their actions will mean something. The gang drives away and disappears. When the cops catch sight of the Model T, Younger Brother is in the driver’s seat. The gang calls Coalhouse to say that they are safe. Father wants Coalhouse to leave the library with him, but Coalhouse insists that Father leave alone. When Waldo sees Father leave alone, he’s convinced Coalhouse is going to blow up the library. Instead, the musician prays for a sign from God to tell him what to do. Next, Coalhouse slowly walks out the front door of the library with his hands raised. He is shot by an officer and collapses on the steps. Sometime later, the marriage of Father and Mother ends, and Harry Thaw begins life anew as he leaves the insane asylum in a fancy convertible roadster sipping champagne.

Less

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Historical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.