Shock Treatment (1981)

PG | 95 mins | Horror, Musical comedy | 30 October 1981

Director:

Jim Sharman

Producer:

John Goldstone

Cinematographer:

Mike Molloy

Editor:

Richard Bedford

Production Designer:

Andrew Sanders

Production Company:

Michael White Ltd.
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HISTORY

According to articles in HR on 8 Apr 1980 and 23 May 1980, executive producers Lou Adler and Michael White re-teamed to make a sequel to The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975, see entry), which was successfully entering its sixth year on the “Friday-Saturday midnight screening circuit,” with a box-office gross surpassing $25 million. In an interview in the 16 Aug 1981 LAT, Richard O’Brien, co-screenwriter of The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Shock Treatment, noted that the original intent was to create a follow-up to the first film. However, actor Tim Curry chose not to reprise the “Dr. Frank-N-Furter” character and the filmmakers felt the actor could not be replaced. Therefore, the sequel’s story focused on the characters of “Brad” and “Janet” and was originally titled The Brad and Janet Show.
       The 13 May 1980 Us noted that The Rocky Horror Picture Show actors Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick and Meat Loaf would star in the sequel. However, the actors did not appear in Shock Treatment. The 25 Nov 1980 Us reported that Cliff De Young and Jessica Harper would replace Bostwick and Sarandon in the roles of “Brad” and Janet.”
       The 8 Apr 1980 HR stated the film was budgeted at $5 million. Var articles on 13 Aug 1980 and 20 Aug 1980 reported principal photography was planned for Aug or Sep 1980 in Dallas, TX, followed by filming in England. However, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) strike began in Jul 1980 and Twentieth Century-Fox delayed the ...

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According to articles in HR on 8 Apr 1980 and 23 May 1980, executive producers Lou Adler and Michael White re-teamed to make a sequel to The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975, see entry), which was successfully entering its sixth year on the “Friday-Saturday midnight screening circuit,” with a box-office gross surpassing $25 million. In an interview in the 16 Aug 1981 LAT, Richard O’Brien, co-screenwriter of The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Shock Treatment, noted that the original intent was to create a follow-up to the first film. However, actor Tim Curry chose not to reprise the “Dr. Frank-N-Furter” character and the filmmakers felt the actor could not be replaced. Therefore, the sequel’s story focused on the characters of “Brad” and “Janet” and was originally titled The Brad and Janet Show.
       The 13 May 1980 Us noted that The Rocky Horror Picture Show actors Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick and Meat Loaf would star in the sequel. However, the actors did not appear in Shock Treatment. The 25 Nov 1980 Us reported that Cliff De Young and Jessica Harper would replace Bostwick and Sarandon in the roles of “Brad” and Janet.”
       The 8 Apr 1980 HR stated the film was budgeted at $5 million. Var articles on 13 Aug 1980 and 20 Aug 1980 reported principal photography was planned for Aug or Sep 1980 in Dallas, TX, followed by filming in England. However, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) strike began in Jul 1980 and Twentieth Century-Fox delayed the start of production. The 22 Oct 1980 Var, the 29 Oct 1980 DV and the 3 Nov 1980 HR reported the newly renamed Shock Treatment would film entirely in England for eight weeks, with rehearsals expected to start 1 Nov 1980. A production chart in the 19 Dec 1980 Var stated principal photography began 17 Nov 1980 in London, England. An item in the 20 Feb 1981 DV noted the completion of principal photography.
       In the 16 Aug 1981 LAT interview, The Rocky Horror Picture Show co-creator Richard O’Brien stated that Twentieth Century-Fox was concerned with how to reach a “mainstream audience” for the film and reportedly planned to test-market Shock Treatment in Fresno, CA, Houston, TX, and Calgary, Alberta, Canada, to determine a national release plan.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1980
---
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1981
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 1980
p. 1, 45
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 1980
p. 1, 4
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1980
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Aug 1981
Section L, p. 3
Us
13 May 1980
---
Us
25 Nov 1980
---
Variety
13 Aug 1980
---
Variety
20 Aug 1980
p. 6, 36
Variety
22 Oct 1980
---
Variety
19 Dec 1980
---
Variety
26 Aug 1981
p, 20
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
DTV Feature Presentation
A Lou Adler-Michael White Production of a Musical by Richard O'Brien
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Addl ideas
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Chief elec
Cam dept
Cam dept
Cam dept
Elec
Video op
Video consultant
ART DIRECTORS
Des by
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept
Art dept
Art dept
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const mgr
Prop master
Standby props
Drapes master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des coord
MUSIC
Mus arr and dir by
Mus rec and mixed by
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Mus instruments and amplification
SOUND
Sd mixer
Dubbing ed
Dubbing mixer
Sd dept
Sd dept
Rec at
VISUAL EFFECTS
End title seq
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Chief makeup
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Makeup
Makeup
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Casting, UK
Casting, US
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod's asst
Prod's asst
Broadcast facilities supplied by
ANIMATION
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show written by Richard O'Brien and Jim Sharman (Twentieth Century-Fox, 1975); Book and lyrics by Richard O'Brien.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Rocky Horror Two
The Brad and Janet Show
Release Date:
30 October 1981
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 30 Oct 1981
Production Date:
17 Nov 1980--mid Feb 1981
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
15 October 1981
PA117621
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Dolby Stereo®
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Brad and Janet Majors return to their hometown, Denton, where life is centered on the reality television shows at DTV studios. They join the townsfolk who congregate in the DTV studio, which also houses Dentonvale, a mental hospital/reality set. Farley Flavors, the network’s sponsor, views the programs and the audience, particularly Janet, from his office. The first show, “Denton Dossier,” begins and Janet joins the audience in singing, but Brad is not as enthusiastic. Betty Hapschatt, the show’s host, interviews local Judge Oliver Wright and after the program, the recently divorced Betty flirts with Judge Wright. “Marriage Maze” is hosted by the seemingly blind Bert Schnick, who calls Janet and Brad to the stage. Schnick convinces Janet that their marriage is a mess, it is her husband’s fault, and he should be examined at Dentonvale. Brad does not want to go, but Janet insists and follows Brad to the Dentonvale hospital/set. As “Dentonvale” airs, Janet and Brad meet Dr. Cosmo McKinley and Dr. Nation McKinley, brother and sister specialists, who declare Brad must be committed. They want Janet to sign a contract, but she promises to sign later and follows Brad to a padded room where he is locked inside a cell. Meanwhile, Janet’s parents, Emily and Harry Weiss, are quizzed on a game show. Emily declares that Brad, who was orphaned as a baby, suffers from infantile repression, and she wins the jackpot. Janet “guest stars” on the show “Happy Homes” as she visits with her parents. Schnick dines with the McKinleys and announces that Farley Flavors wants Janet to star in the network’s ...

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Brad and Janet Majors return to their hometown, Denton, where life is centered on the reality television shows at DTV studios. They join the townsfolk who congregate in the DTV studio, which also houses Dentonvale, a mental hospital/reality set. Farley Flavors, the network’s sponsor, views the programs and the audience, particularly Janet, from his office. The first show, “Denton Dossier,” begins and Janet joins the audience in singing, but Brad is not as enthusiastic. Betty Hapschatt, the show’s host, interviews local Judge Oliver Wright and after the program, the recently divorced Betty flirts with Judge Wright. “Marriage Maze” is hosted by the seemingly blind Bert Schnick, who calls Janet and Brad to the stage. Schnick convinces Janet that their marriage is a mess, it is her husband’s fault, and he should be examined at Dentonvale. Brad does not want to go, but Janet insists and follows Brad to the Dentonvale hospital/set. As “Dentonvale” airs, Janet and Brad meet Dr. Cosmo McKinley and Dr. Nation McKinley, brother and sister specialists, who declare Brad must be committed. They want Janet to sign a contract, but she promises to sign later and follows Brad to a padded room where he is locked inside a cell. Meanwhile, Janet’s parents, Emily and Harry Weiss, are quizzed on a game show. Emily declares that Brad, who was orphaned as a baby, suffers from infantile repression, and she wins the jackpot. Janet “guest stars” on the show “Happy Homes” as she visits with her parents. Schnick dines with the McKinleys and announces that Farley Flavors wants Janet to star in the network’s new show. Meanwhile, as Betty Hapschatt and Judge Wright wonder about Farley Flavors and conspiracies, they are interrupted by Betty’s former husband, Ralph Hapschatt, and his new co-star, Macy Struthers. Ralph hands Betty a letter with the news that her show has been cancelled. Janet returns to the Dentonvale set to visit Brad, who is now tied in a straitjacket, but Schnick and the McKinleys insist she cannot see her husband. Farley Flavors appears on a television screen and asks Janet to star in his new show. She is excited by the idea, but still wants to see her husband. Farley, Schnick and the doctors convince Janet that Brad hates her. They claim he needs a woman of exceptional success, and she can help them cure Brad by becoming a television star. Janet agrees and learns that everyone is confined to the DTV studio for the night. The McKinley siblings enjoy a romantic rendezvous in their room, while Schnick and Janet settle into their respective padded Dentonvale bedrooms. Audience members sleep in their seats, while Betty and the Judge, who have been locked out of her office, hide on an upper landing to learn what is going on. In the morning, Janet meets Dr. Cosmo McKinley in the wardrobe room, where he makes a sexy black dress for her appearance on the DTV morning show. Janet’s song on the show is a hit and the audience loves her. After the performance, Janet meets her parents in Brad’s room. Brad is now bound and gagged, and her father protests his harsh treatment while Janet flaunts her success. Janet joins the doctors in her dressing room, announces she is a star and complains that she is tired of hearing about Brad. As Janet steps into the hallway to wave to her adoring fans, Dr. Nation McKinley slips pills into her drink. Janet becomes woozy, and Nation helps her back into the dressing room, where she passes out and has crazy dreams. Betty Hapschatt and Judge Wright sneak into the wardrobe department and change into medical uniforms to blend into the crowd during the upcoming “Sanity For Today” sequence. In Janet’s dressing room, she regains consciousness and meets her band, Oscar Drill and the Bits. She is upset and they offer her drugs, but Nation McKinley tosses their pills aside and drugs Janet with stronger medication. Betty sneaks into an office and logs onto a computer, where she learns that Cosmo and Nation McKinley are merely character actors. She also discovers that Farley Flavors is Brad’s twin brother. Their parents died at birth and the twins were separated, with Brad adopted “uptown” and Farley adopted “downtown.” Betty and Judge Wright free Brad and sneak him to the stage. Farley is interviewed on camera and insists he will reveal more than a new series that night, he will “put sanity back on the map.” Janet sees Farley and thinks he is Brad. She is led to the stage, and introduced as “Miss Mental Health,” and awarded a convertible automobile; but Cosmo McKinley pockets the car keys for himself. Bert Schnick appears without his sunglasses and claims Janet “cured” his blindness, with help from Farley Flavors. As Farley steps forward, Brad bursts onstage and reveals he is Farley’s brother. Brad accuses Farley of attempting to steal his wife and his life. Farley orders Brad locked back in Dentonvale, but Janet never signed the contract to commit him. When Janet chooses her husband, Farley orders them to leave. Farley announces that Macy Struthers is the new star of the show and cajoles the crowd to follow him on the DTV trail to Dentonvale. As Farley leads the way to the mental hospital set, audience members put on straitjackets and join him in a musical number. After the crowd leaves, Janet, Brad, Betty, and Judge Wright return to the main studio, where they join Janet’s band, Oscar Drill and the Bits. They hotwire the convertible Janet won, open the doors to the outside world, and drive away, leaving everyone else dancing in Dentonvale.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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