Annie (1982)

PG | 128 mins | Musical | 21 May 1982

Director:

John Huston

Writer:

Carol Sobieski

Producer:

Ray Stark

Cinematographer:

Richard Moore

Production Designer:

Dale Hennesy

Production Company:

Rastar Films, Inc.
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HISTORY

       Although opening titles credit “Sandy” the dog as playing himself in the film, official 1981 production notes found in AMPAS library files stated that Sandy was played by Bingo, a six-year-old Otterhound. Production files also indicated that 175 stagehands, Rockettes, and musicians from Radio City Music Hall contributed to the film, but they are not credited onscreen. Four new songs were written for the screen adaptation: “Dumb Dog,” “We’ve Got Annie,” “Let’s Go To The Movies,” and “Sign.”
       The 13-19 May 1977 edition of LA Free Press stated that Thomas Meehan, Charles Strouse, and Martin Charnin, creators of the original stage play, asked $5 million for film rights, and requested an additional $1 million for Mike Nichols to direct. Later that year, a 28 Dec 1977 Var article announced that Columbia Pictures had acquired the property for $9.5 million, reporting that it was the most expensive deal ever made for film rights to a stage musical to date. Columbia expected to begin principal photography in 1980 in order to release the picture in time for the 1981 Christmas holiday. On 7 Oct 1978, DV reported that Herb Ross would direct for producer David Begelman, but a HR news item on 18 Sep 1979 stated that Randal Kleiser was hired to direct based on the success of Grease (1978, see entry). However, Village Voice later revealed on 25 Feb 1980 that the studio chose Kleiser because Ross demanded final cut privileges, giving him authority to determine the final version of the film before its release. Begelman and Kleiser reportedly began considering Carol Burnett for the role of ... More Less

       Although opening titles credit “Sandy” the dog as playing himself in the film, official 1981 production notes found in AMPAS library files stated that Sandy was played by Bingo, a six-year-old Otterhound. Production files also indicated that 175 stagehands, Rockettes, and musicians from Radio City Music Hall contributed to the film, but they are not credited onscreen. Four new songs were written for the screen adaptation: “Dumb Dog,” “We’ve Got Annie,” “Let’s Go To The Movies,” and “Sign.”
       The 13-19 May 1977 edition of LA Free Press stated that Thomas Meehan, Charles Strouse, and Martin Charnin, creators of the original stage play, asked $5 million for film rights, and requested an additional $1 million for Mike Nichols to direct. Later that year, a 28 Dec 1977 Var article announced that Columbia Pictures had acquired the property for $9.5 million, reporting that it was the most expensive deal ever made for film rights to a stage musical to date. Columbia expected to begin principal photography in 1980 in order to release the picture in time for the 1981 Christmas holiday. On 7 Oct 1978, DV reported that Herb Ross would direct for producer David Begelman, but a HR news item on 18 Sep 1979 stated that Randal Kleiser was hired to direct based on the success of Grease (1978, see entry). However, Village Voice later revealed on 25 Feb 1980 that the studio chose Kleiser because Ross demanded final cut privileges, giving him authority to determine the final version of the film before its release. Begelman and Kleiser reportedly began considering Carol Burnett for the role of “Miss Hannigan” as early as 5 Oct 1979, according to a DV news item published that day. At that time, Thomas Meehan had been hired to adapt his work for the screen; the $20 million production was scheduled to begin Dec 1980. However, hands changed again when David Begelman took over as president of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) and in turn Columbia hired Ray Stark as Annie ’s new producer, according to a 13 Dec 1979 HR news item.
       A 7 Mar 1980 DV brief and a 31 Mar 1980 HR item reported that Sean Connery was in negotiations to star as “Daddy Warbucks.” On 4 Apr 1980, HR announced that Randal Kleiser had dropped out of the directorial role and was slated to be replaced by Bob Fosse, but on 9 Apr 1980, HR corrected the story to state that Kleiser was still attached and Stark had instead approached Fosse to play the role of “Rooster.”
       A 23 May 1980 HR news item reported that principal photography was rescheduled to begin May 1981. However, in an article for the 18 Jun 1980 Var, Klesier hinted at “creative differences” between himself and Stark that might cause him to step down. The article also noted that Carol Sobieski was named as the new screenwriter. Despite the 26 Jun 1980 HR report that Francis Ford Coppola was interested in replacing Kleiser and the 7 Jul 1980 DV stating that Herb Ross was once again being considered to direct, DV announced on 23 Jun 1980 that John Huston would direct the picture, and Bette Midler was considering the part of Miss Hannigan. Although DV broke the news of Albert Finney’s casting as Warbucks on 10 Jul 1980, a LAHExam brief on 20 Jul 1980 stated that Cary Grant remained the studio’s top choice. Columbia Pictures’ pre-production notes dated summer 1980 from AMPAS library files stated that the nationwide casting search for “Annie” had been underway since 22 May 1980, with a panel of former child stars acting as advisors. After training finalists at “Annie Academy,” Columbia expected to run screentests and announce the winner by 1 Dec 1980. Filming was set to begin in Mar 1981.
       On 17 Oct 1980, NYT announced that Carol Burnett was officially cast as Miss Hannigan. While various sources including the 3 Sep 1980 Var, the 2 Oct 1980 HR, and the 16 Oct 1980 HR reported that Jack Nicholson, Mickey Rooney, and Mick Jagger, respectively, were all considered to play “Rooster,” an 8 Dec 1980 DV item confirmed that Tim Curry was cast in the role. Dance rehearsals were scheduled to begin 15 Mar 1981 in New York City, while principal photography would take place starting 28 May 1981 in New York City and West Long Branch, NJ.
       A 14 Jan 1981 Columbia press release announced that nine-year-old Aileen Quinn would make her motion picture debut in the title role after competing against over 8,000 other girls in twenty-two U.S. cities and London, England. That same day, Evening Outlook reported Annie producers were secretly negotiating a deal with the Director’s Guild of America (DGA) that would protect the production in the event of a looming strike beginning 1 Jul 1981. A 27 Jan 1981 New Jersey Motion Picture & Television Commission news release stated that filming would begin 4 May 1981 and continue for seven weeks at Monmouth College’s Woodrow Wilson Hall, which was the setting of the Warbucks estate.
       However, the filmmakers remained concerned about the possible strike and principal photography officially began several weeks early on 29 Apr 1981. Rastar reorganized the filming schedule so that all scenes on the East Coast could be shot before the end of Jun 1981; production would then move to Burbank Studios in CA for an additional eight weeks, according to a 29 Apr 1981 HR article. That same day, Var confirmed that filming was underway at Radio City Music Hall in New York City until relocating to Monmouth College, NJ, on 6 May 1981. An article in the 26 Jun 1981 LAT reported that the production had squeezed a week’s worth of New York City filming into three days to avoid the further negative publicity of falling behind schedule. Production files stated that other New York City locations included: Greenwich Village, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York City Public Library, and the Plaza Hotel. The climactic bridge scene filmed with a second unit of stuntmen at the Passaic River in East Newark, NJ. Governor Brendan Byrne visited the set to sign a bill allowing more flexibility for night filming with minors. Props included authentic rare vehicles, including a du Pont and a 1929 Duesenberg J Dual Cowl Phaeton. According to the 1981 UK edition of the “Annie” Official Movie Magazine, Woodrow Wilson Hall was furnished with $80,000 rugs, $20,000 Oriental vases, Louis XV chairs, and props from Hello, Dolly! (1969, see entry), supplied by Burbank Studios and private collectors. A 15 Nov 1981 LAT story reported that budgetary issues arose on the NJ set when producer Ray Stark was forced to hire more Teamster union drivers than anticipated, pushing him $500,000 over the $1 million transportation budget.
       A DV brief on 15 Jul 1981 announced that filming had resumed at Burbank Studios following two weeks’ hiatus for scheduled dance rehearsals. Although various sources listed Robert Kline as Annie ’s cinematographer, an article in the 26 Jun 1981 LAT reported that he had been replaced mid-production by Richard Moore, who was to re-shoot a number of exterior scenes and a few possible interiors, including the Radio City Music Hall number, “Let’s Go to the Movies.” All re-shoots were to take place at Burbank Studios. Production notes indicated that production designer Dale Hennesy spent five months constructing a $1 million New York City street on the Burbank Studio lot. However, Hennesy died during filming in Jul 1981; a 28 Aug 1981 LAT story revealed the street was to be kept standing and named “Dale Hennesy Street” in his honor. On 20 Aug 1981, Var reported that newly-hired cinematographer Richard Moore underwent bypass surgery and was replaced by Harry Stradling, Jr., but this report was unconfirmed by other sources and Stradling receives no onscreen credit. The 9 Sep 1981 Var announced that filming was officially completed on 4 Sep 1981, though DV later reported that Carol Burnett, Tim Curry, and Bernadette Peters shot more footage for the “Easy Street” musical number on 4 Nov 1981. On 5 Oct 1981, a HR brief stated that Michelle Della-Save had a role in Annie, but she receives no onscreen credit and her participation remains unknown.
       Before cameras even started rolling, Columbia executives initiated pre-emptive marketing and investment deals in Los Angeles, CA, New York City, Chicago, IL, and Dallas, TX, according to a 1 Apr 1981 Var and a 7 Apr 1981 DV, and just before production concluded, Columbia began arranging distribution and major publicity campaigns. According to the 14 Aug 1981 HR, producers planned to screen thirty minutes of footage to exhibitors in twenty-eight states, hoping to persuade them of the film’s blockbuster potential. A 19 Aug 1981 Columbia press release announced a deal to host fundraising premieres in New York City, Los Angeles, Toronto, Canada, and other cities throughout May and Jun 1981 to benefit public television. A second Columbia release on 24 Nov 1981 declared that Annie would have a featured float in the 1981 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. On 8 Feb 1982, Columbia issued a statement saying that Los Angeles public broadcasting television station (PBS), KCET, would air a behind-the-scenes special called “Lights! Camera! ‘Annie’!: The Making of a Major Hollywood Musical” on 17 and 21 Mar 1982. According to a 2 Mar 1982 DV news item, PBS scheduled charity galas in over 100 cities between 17 May and 17 Jun 1982. The film would then expand to 1,000 more screens on 18 Jun 1982, followed by an additional 1,000 on 16 Jul 1982. For non-charity-related screenings, the Avco Theatre and Mann’s Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles charged $6 per ticket, which, according to the 14 Apr 1982 HR, set the record for the city’s highest-ever movie admission fee to date.
       Although production notes indicated a final budget of over $35 million, the 13 May 1982 LAHExam estimated a cost of $40 million with an extra $9 million for advertising and prints. The 16 May 1982 LAT calculated over $42 million and $10-13 million advertising, declaring Annie one of the most expensive movies ever made at that time. However, a NYT article on 2 May 1982 detailed the film’s numerous merchandise promotions with companies including Crayola, Random House, Marriott hotels, Sears Roebuck & Co., Knickerbocker Toys, Procter & Gamble, and Ken-L-Ration dog food. An advertisement in the 2 Apr 1982 issue of Publishers Weekly announced that Random House would adapt the film and continue the story of orphan Annie in a paperback book series. The 27 May 1982 DV announced Columbia Pictures’ takeover by Coca-Cola, which resulted in additional product tie-ins. On 4 Jun 1982, Columbia released a statement that Annie had grossed $1,743,534 during its first two-week run in fourteen theatres in New York City and Los Angeles, and by 19 Sep 1982, LAT reported that the $50 million box office returns were still shy of a profit. A correction issued in a 3 Apr 1997 HR brief conceded that Annie was not a “commercial disappointment,” since the musical ultimately returned more than twice its cost to Columbia.
       The film received mixed reviews, though dissenting critics were very vocal. On 19 Sep 1982, LAT published a story about Ray Stark’s poor reaction to negative reviews, reporting that Stark attempted to write a newspaper article and a screenplay bashing film critics.
       The film was nominated for two Academy Awards in the categories of Art Direction and Music (Original Song Score and its Adaptation – or – Adapted Score).
       In addition to the preceding comic strip, Broadway musical, and film adaptations, Stark and Huston’s is just one motion picture version of the Annie story in popular culture. A sequel to the 1982 production titled, Annie: A Royal Adventure!, aired on television in 1995. The Wonderful World of Disney [under The Walt Disney Company] released a television movie-musical version of Annie directed by Rob Marshall (ABC, 7 Nov 1999). As of Oct 2013, Sony Pictures Entertainment began principal photography on another film adaptation of Annie, starring Quvenzhane Wallis, Jamie Foxx, and Cameron Diaz, expected to be released in 2014.
      End credits acknowledge Chicago-Tribune New York News Syndicate, Inc. for the comic strip, Little Orphan Annie®, on which the 1977 stage play Annie was based. The Broadway show was “Originally Presented on the New York Stage” by Mike Nichols, produced by Alvin Nederlander Associates, Inc. and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.; and “Produced on the New York Stage” by Irwin Meyer, Stephen R. Friedman, Lewis Allen, and Icarus Productions, Inc. The film’s producers also include thanks to Monmouth College in West Long Branch, NJ.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
"Annie" Official Movie Magazine (UK)
1981
p. 26.
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1978.
---
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1979.
---
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1980.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1980.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jul 1980.
---
Daily Variety
10 Jul 1980.
---
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1980.
---
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1981.
---
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1981.
---
Daily Variety
4 Nov 1981.
---
Daily Variety
2 Mar 1982.
---
Daily Variety
27 May 1982.
---
Evening Outlook
14 Jan 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1982
pp. 3-4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 1997.
---
LA Free Press
13-19 May 1977.
---
LAHExam
20 Jul 1980.
---
LAHExam
13 May 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1981
pp. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1981
Section VI, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
28 Aug 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1981
pp. 1, 3-5.
Los Angeles Times
16 May 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1982
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
19 Sept 1982
pp. 1, 26.
New Jersey Motion Picture & Television Commission
27 Jan 1981.
---
New York Times
17 Oct 1980.
---
New York Times
2 May 1982
pp. 1, 2, 42, 43, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72.
New York Times
21 May 1982
p. 4.
Publishers Weekly
2 Apr 1982.
---
Variety
28 Dec 1977
p. 1, 4.
Variety
18 Jun 1980
p. 4.
Variety
3 Sep 1980.
---
Variety
1 Apr 1981.
---
Variety
29 Apr 1981.
---
Variety
20 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
9 Sep 1981.
---
Variety
12 May 1982
p. 11.
Village Voice
25 Feb 1980.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
A Ray Stark Production
A John Huston Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit cam
Process cam
Process coord
Cam op
Cam tech
Still photog
Steadi-Cam op
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
New York art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst film ed
2d asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
Leadman
Greensman
Drapery man
Prop master
Asst prop master
Antique cars provided by
COSTUMES
Asst cost des
Men's ward supv
Men`s cost
Men`s cost
Women's ward supv
Women`s cost
Women`s cost
Jewelry by
MUSIC
Mus arr and cond
Mus sequences created by
Mus ed
Assoc mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus res
Mus scoring mixer
Vocal arr
SOUND
Sd eff
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Playback op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photo eff and opticals
Spec eff coord
Titles by
DANCE
Mus staging and choreog by
Dance arr
1st asst choreog
Asst choreog
Gymnastic instructor
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod exec
Exec asst to the prod
Casting
Casting
Rastar marketing
Asst to the prod
Asst to Mr. Huston
Asst to Mr. Layton
"ANNIE" search coord
Casting asst
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Prod office coord
Prod office coord
Vocal coach
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Studio teacher
"SANDY" trained by
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Circus seq by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the stage play Annie, book by Thomas Meehan, music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin (New York, 21 Apr 1977).
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 May 1982
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 May 1982
Los Angeles opening: 19 May 1982
Dallas opening: 20 May 1982
Production Date:
29 April--4 September 1981
4 November 1981
Copyright Claimant:
Rastar Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 May 1982
Copyright Number:
PA138787
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Lenses
Lenses & Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
128
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26550
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1933, at New York City’s Hudson Street Home for Girls, a ten-year-old orphan, Annie, quiets her friend Molly’s nightmare by encouraging her to remain hopeful that one day their parents will return to take them home. The drunken orphanage matron, Miss Hannigan, orders the girls to wake up and clean the entire building before breakfast. Annie hides in a laundry basket, which the girls load into the laundry truck while Miss Hannigan distractedly flirts with the driver. Annie gets off the truck and runs through the street market, evading police officers and fighting a group of boys picking on a stray dog. When a dog catcher attempts to take the animal away, Annie pretends he is her pet and names him Sandy. A policeman spots Annie and returns her to Miss Hannigan, and the girls smuggle Sandy inside. Grace Farrell, the private secretary to Wall Street billionaire Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks, stops at the orphanage to select a child to spend a week with Warbucks as part of a publicity stunt. Grace takes a liking to Annie and threatens to fire Miss Hannigan for refusing to let her leave with the girl. Grace, Annie, and Sandy arrive at Warbucks’s lavish mansion, where Annie meets the household staff and Warbucks’s bodyguard, Punjab. Annie assumes she will have to clean while she is at the house, but the staff assures her she is an honored guest, free to enjoy her visit. Although the stuffy and abrasive Warbucks is annoyed to discover that Annie is not a boy, he allows her to stay. At the orphanage, Miss Hannigan drunkenly laments her miserable life when her gambler brother Rooster and his girlfriend, Lily ... +


In 1933, at New York City’s Hudson Street Home for Girls, a ten-year-old orphan, Annie, quiets her friend Molly’s nightmare by encouraging her to remain hopeful that one day their parents will return to take them home. The drunken orphanage matron, Miss Hannigan, orders the girls to wake up and clean the entire building before breakfast. Annie hides in a laundry basket, which the girls load into the laundry truck while Miss Hannigan distractedly flirts with the driver. Annie gets off the truck and runs through the street market, evading police officers and fighting a group of boys picking on a stray dog. When a dog catcher attempts to take the animal away, Annie pretends he is her pet and names him Sandy. A policeman spots Annie and returns her to Miss Hannigan, and the girls smuggle Sandy inside. Grace Farrell, the private secretary to Wall Street billionaire Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks, stops at the orphanage to select a child to spend a week with Warbucks as part of a publicity stunt. Grace takes a liking to Annie and threatens to fire Miss Hannigan for refusing to let her leave with the girl. Grace, Annie, and Sandy arrive at Warbucks’s lavish mansion, where Annie meets the household staff and Warbucks’s bodyguard, Punjab. Annie assumes she will have to clean while she is at the house, but the staff assures her she is an honored guest, free to enjoy her visit. Although the stuffy and abrasive Warbucks is annoyed to discover that Annie is not a boy, he allows her to stay. At the orphanage, Miss Hannigan drunkenly laments her miserable life when her gambler brother Rooster and his girlfriend, Lily St. Regis, show up to borrow money. That night, Annie wakes to witness a Bolshevik attempt to assassinate Warbucks, which happens quite regularly, Grace says, due to Warbucks’s financial success. Later, Annie makes Warbucks feel guilty for being too busy to take her to the movies, so he rents Radio City Musical Hall for the evening showing of Camille. Annie falls asleep during the film, so Grace and Warbucks take her home and put her to bed. The next morning, Grace proposes that Warbucks adopt Annie as his ward. He insists the only things he loves are money, power, and capitalism, but because of his obvious attraction to Grace, he agrees. Warbucks personally takes the paperwork to the orphanage, where Hannigan attempts and fails to seduce him. At his estate, Warbucks tells Annie about his achievements and wealth, realizing that he now wants someone in his life with whom he can share it. He gives Annie an engraved gold locket, but she refuses it, instead showing him the broken locket her parents left with her at the orphanage when they promised to return someday. Warbucks books a radio appearance offering $50,000 to Annie’s real parents, prompting a mob of imposters to show up at his front gates. While Grace interviews the couples, Warbucks flies Annie in an autogyro to Washington, D.C. to meet President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. At the White House, the business-minded Warbucks disputes Roosevelt’s Democratic government work programs that would help many of the nation’s orphans. Adopting Annie’s infectious optimism, the president convinces Warbucks to oversee the program and find orphans looking for a new life. Meanwhile, Rooster and Lily inform Miss Hannigan of their plan to disguise themselves as Annie’s parents and collect the reward. Miss Hannigan reveals that Annie’s parents died in a fire and that she possesses the second half of the gold locket, which they can use to fool Warbucks. Molly overhears and tries to escape to warn Annie, but Miss Hannigan locks her and the other orphans in a closet. Back at the Warbucks estate, Grace says none of the 800 couples she interviewed were Annie’s true parents, but when Rooster and Lily present the locket and a forged birth certificate, she and Warbucks concede to the charade. Although Warbucks writes the check for $50,000, everyone is disappointed to see Annie and Sandy leave. Miss Hannigan joins the criminals in their car and they flee into the city. Sandy jumps out of the trunk and finds that the girls have escaped from the orphanage, leading them back to the Warbucks mansion. Alerted to the ruse, the billionaire sends a search team to track the kidnappers down. Annie convinces her captors to stop the car and runs away, climbing the train tracks on an elevated lift bridge. Determined to kill her, Rooster gives chase, despite his sister’s attempts to stop him. Punjab descends in the autogyro and lifts Annie to safety just before she is about to fall. Annie returns to live with “Daddy” Warbucks, who throws her a carnival celebration with President Roosevelt and all her orphan friends. Warbucks presents her with the new locket and embraces Annie and Grace as they watch fireworks over the estate. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.