Author! Author! (1982)

PG | 110 mins | Comedy | 18 June 1982

Director:

Arthur Hiller

Writer:

Israel Horovitz

Producer:

Irwin Winkler

Cinematographer:

Victor J. Kemper

Production Designer:

Gene Rudolf

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

       Contemporary sources provide varying reports of the film’s changing start and completion dates. According to a 4 Sep 1981 Entertainment Today news item, principal photography for Author! Author! was scheduled to begin on 28 Oct 1981, with production to take place entirely in New York City. However, an official Oct 1981 Twentieth Century-Fox press release found in AMPAS library production files announced a 2 Nov 1981 start date at Manhattan’s Astoria Studios, with an additional week of filming to take place in Gloucester, MA in Jan 1982. Production was originally expected to be completed by the end of Jan 1982. Once filming had commenced, the 17 Dec 1981 DV reported that both Gloucester and Boston would serve as locations at the end of Jan 1982, though no Boston locations have been confirmed. A 2 Feb 1982 DV stated that 1 Feb marked the last day of production in NY, suggesting that delays were caused by differences between Al Pacino and producer Irwin Winkler after Pacino repeatedly showed up late to set. The 5 Feb 1982 LAHExam reported that Gloucester filming finally finished on 4 Feb.
       The screenplay for Author! Author! marked the screenwriting debut of playwright Israel Horovitz. Despite the film's negative reviews, Al Pacino received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor--Comedy or Musical for his performance.
      Although not listed in the end credits, official ASCAP records indicate that an original song titled “Comin Home To You” was written for the movie by Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, and David Grusin, and performed by Michael Franks. “Happy Birthday To You” by Mildred J. Hill and Patty ... More Less

       Contemporary sources provide varying reports of the film’s changing start and completion dates. According to a 4 Sep 1981 Entertainment Today news item, principal photography for Author! Author! was scheduled to begin on 28 Oct 1981, with production to take place entirely in New York City. However, an official Oct 1981 Twentieth Century-Fox press release found in AMPAS library production files announced a 2 Nov 1981 start date at Manhattan’s Astoria Studios, with an additional week of filming to take place in Gloucester, MA in Jan 1982. Production was originally expected to be completed by the end of Jan 1982. Once filming had commenced, the 17 Dec 1981 DV reported that both Gloucester and Boston would serve as locations at the end of Jan 1982, though no Boston locations have been confirmed. A 2 Feb 1982 DV stated that 1 Feb marked the last day of production in NY, suggesting that delays were caused by differences between Al Pacino and producer Irwin Winkler after Pacino repeatedly showed up late to set. The 5 Feb 1982 LAHExam reported that Gloucester filming finally finished on 4 Feb.
       The screenplay for Author! Author! marked the screenwriting debut of playwright Israel Horovitz. Despite the film's negative reviews, Al Pacino received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor--Comedy or Musical for his performance.
      Although not listed in the end credits, official ASCAP records indicate that an original song titled “Comin Home To You” was written for the movie by Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, and David Grusin, and performed by Michael Franks. “Happy Birthday To You” by Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill can also be heard in the film, but receives no onscreen credit. Producers include thanks to the New York City Mayor’s Office for Motion Picture and Television, New York City Tactical Police Force, the MA Film Commission and the City of Gloucester, MA.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Dec 1981.
---
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1982.
---
Entertainment Today
4 Sep 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 1982
p. 3, 10.
LAHExam
5 Feb 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Jun 1982
p. 1.
New York Times
18 Jun 1982
p. 10.
Variety
16 Jun 1982
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Irwin Winkler Production
An Arthur Hiller Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Key grip
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Best boy
Best boy
Best boy
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed, New York
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst set dec
Master scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Women`s cost
Men`s cost
Furs by
MUSIC
Mus
Original music copyright  1982 Twentieth Century-Fox Music Corp.
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Looping ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom man
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Extra casting by
Extra casting by
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation capt
Loc auditor
Unit pub
D.G.A. trainee
A.F.I. director's intern
Casting asst
Asst to Mr. Winkler
Asst to Mr. Hiller
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 June 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 18 June 1982
New York opening: week of 18 June 1982
Production Date:
2 November 1981--4 February 1982 in New York City and Gloucester, MA
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
30 June 1982
Copyright Number:
PA147146
Physical Properties:
Sound
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26672
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After a disagreement during a casting session for his new Broadway play, English with Tears, playwright Ivan Travalian fires his director. At home in his Greenwich Village, New York apartment, Ivan is greeted by his wife, Gloria, his teenage son, Igor, and Gloria’s young children from three previous marriages: Debbie, Bonnie, Spike and Geraldo. Because Ivan has forgotten it is his forty-third birthday, the family playfully chases him around the house and smashes a birthday cake in his face. The next morning, Ivan convinces Morris Finestein to take over as director, despite Finestein’s hatred of the play. When Ivan shares the news with Arnold Kreplich in rehearsal, he mistakenly calls Finestein “Larry Kotzwinkle.” After Gloria comes to bed late that night, Ivan confronts her about a rumor he heard that she was seen leaving a hotel with a man named Larry Kotzwinkle, but for many days she dodges and delays the conversation. Frustrated by her evasiveness, Ivan runs to the school where Gloria teaches and interrupts her French class to speak with her; she explains that Larry Kotzwinkle is an “intimate friend,” and she is leaving Ivan to move into Larry’s beach house in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Ivan attends a lunch meeting with Kreplich and two financial backers, Patrick and Jackie Dicker, to discuss their contribution of $1.3 million and the casting of the show’s lead, film star Alice Detroit. Later, Kreplich admits to Ivan that he lied to the press and Alice has not actually been confirmed. Ivan and Kreplich meet the actress at the Plaza Hotel and with ... +


After a disagreement during a casting session for his new Broadway play, English with Tears, playwright Ivan Travalian fires his director. At home in his Greenwich Village, New York apartment, Ivan is greeted by his wife, Gloria, his teenage son, Igor, and Gloria’s young children from three previous marriages: Debbie, Bonnie, Spike and Geraldo. Because Ivan has forgotten it is his forty-third birthday, the family playfully chases him around the house and smashes a birthday cake in his face. The next morning, Ivan convinces Morris Finestein to take over as director, despite Finestein’s hatred of the play. When Ivan shares the news with Arnold Kreplich in rehearsal, he mistakenly calls Finestein “Larry Kotzwinkle.” After Gloria comes to bed late that night, Ivan confronts her about a rumor he heard that she was seen leaving a hotel with a man named Larry Kotzwinkle, but for many days she dodges and delays the conversation. Frustrated by her evasiveness, Ivan runs to the school where Gloria teaches and interrupts her French class to speak with her; she explains that Larry Kotzwinkle is an “intimate friend,” and she is leaving Ivan to move into Larry’s beach house in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Ivan attends a lunch meeting with Kreplich and two financial backers, Patrick and Jackie Dicker, to discuss their contribution of $1.3 million and the casting of the show’s lead, film star Alice Detroit. Later, Kreplich admits to Ivan that he lied to the press and Alice has not actually been confirmed. Ivan and Kreplich meet the actress at the Plaza Hotel and with Ivan’s convincing, she agrees to take the part despite her lack of stage experience. At another casting session, Ivan calls another crewmember by the wrong name, causing Kreplich to worry about his distracted and depressed behavior. During dinner that night, Debbie breaks down over her and Bonnie's impending return to their real father in Greenwich, Connecticut. After the girls leave, Spike boards a flight to Daytona, Florida, where he will live with his father. Geraldo, however, stays with the two Travalians, since his own father is in Spain. In rehearsal, the producers are thrilled with Alice Detroit’s work, but Finestein demands Ivan rewrite the second act. One night, Alice leaves Ivan a flirtatious phone message inviting him to meet her across town. As they walk along the river, he shares stories about his childhood as an orphan before he was adopted at age seven. They go to her apartment and make love. Afterward, he admits that sexual relationships make him anxious because he becomes attached to women after he develops a sexual history with them. Sometime later, at a charity ball to promote his play, Alice suggests that she move in with him. Despite his concern for the boys, she quickly joins the family in their apartment. After a few weeks together, she admits that she feels stifled by domestic life, and hopes to get out and explore New York’s cultural scene. The couple drags Igor and Geraldo to a Romanian film and dinner at a fancy restaurant, where Alice spends the entire meal away from the table, socializing. Eleven weeks after officially leaving her husband, Gloria returns to the house and is livid to discover Alice has been living there. Ivan confesses that he does not love Alice and wants Gloria back, but Gloria announces her plan to wed Larry that spring. At rehearsal later, Alice willingly agrees to move out with no hard feelings. After work, Ivan returns home to find two policemen looking for Bonnie and Debbie, who have run away from their father and are hiding inside. Although Ivan agrees to return the girls to their legal guardian, he secretly leads them to the rooftop in an attempt to escape. However, Ivan and the children cannot find a way back down and the police surround the building. Bonnie tells Ivan that Gloria actually won custody over her and her sister, making it legal for them to stay in New York. While Ivan signs paperwork with the police, Spike returns to the house pretending to be a friend of Igor’s. When Kreplich and Finestein show up to discuss Ivan’s new draft of the script, the playwright storms out, hailing a cab to drive him all the way to Gloucester in an effort to get Gloria back. When he finds her with Larry, she blames Ivan for forcing her to marry him and play a role she knew she could never fulfill. Convinced that her habits as a drifter will not change, Ivan tells her she is selfish and heartless for abandoning her children, and leaves without her. Back in New York, Ivan announces his official divorce from Gloria. Although he is unsure if the court will allow him to keep Debbie and Bonnie, the girls say they will choose him in the custody battle. During the opening performance of his play, Ivan sits backstage with Igor and worries that if the show fails, he will not make enough money to care for all five children. At the premiere’s after party, positive reviews pour in, but everyone waits for the final word from the New York Times, which will make or break the show. Ivan and the children leave the club and rush to a nearby newsstand. The kids assure him that they will love him even if the play flops, but they open the papers to find that English with Tears received a glowing review. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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