Friday the 13th -- Part III (1982)

R | 95 mins | Horror | 13 August 1982

Director:

Steve Miner

Producer:

Frank Mancuso, Jr.

Cinematographer:

Gerald Feil

Editor:

George Hively

Production Designer:

Robb Wilson King

Production Companies:

Jason Productions, Inc., Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

Various contemporary sources referred to the film by the following working and review titles: Friday the 13th—III, Friday the 13th, Part III, Friday the 13th Part 3, and Friday the 13th Part III.
       End credits indicate that the picture was filmed on location at the Valuzet Movie Ranch in Saugas, CA, using The Marks 3-Depix® Converter and a Louma Crane by Samcine. The producers include thanks to: Chrysler Motors, Goodyear Tire Company, Jack Daniels Distillery, Olympia Beer, Valvoline Oil Company, and Centerline Wheel Corporation.
       A 27 Jan 1982 HR brief claimed that Paramount Pictures, along with Friday the 13th (1980, see entry) and Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981, see entry) production company Georgetown Productions, had agreed to film Friday the 13th—Part III entirely in 3-D. Despite this initial report of the company’s involvement, Georgetown is not credited onscreen.
       According to an undated article in Screen International, Paramount executive Al Lo Presti spent nearly a year researching projection equipment in U.S. theaters in order to develop a 3-D lens and projection system exclusively for the studio. The 27 Sep 1982 issue of Forbes magazine reported that Gale Weaver, owner of Sirius II Corp., visited the set of Friday the 13th—Part III, and heard producer Frank Mancuso, Jr.’s complaint that faulty projection lenses inhibited filmmakers from distributing pictures in 3-D. In fourteen days, Weaver developed a prototype lens that would be adaptable to “almost all theater projectors.” Sirius II Corp. received $1 million to manufacture the lenses as a joint venture with Paramount.
       On 10 Aug ... More Less

Various contemporary sources referred to the film by the following working and review titles: Friday the 13th—III, Friday the 13th, Part III, Friday the 13th Part 3, and Friday the 13th Part III.
       End credits indicate that the picture was filmed on location at the Valuzet Movie Ranch in Saugas, CA, using The Marks 3-Depix® Converter and a Louma Crane by Samcine. The producers include thanks to: Chrysler Motors, Goodyear Tire Company, Jack Daniels Distillery, Olympia Beer, Valvoline Oil Company, and Centerline Wheel Corporation.
       A 27 Jan 1982 HR brief claimed that Paramount Pictures, along with Friday the 13th (1980, see entry) and Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981, see entry) production company Georgetown Productions, had agreed to film Friday the 13th—Part III entirely in 3-D. Despite this initial report of the company’s involvement, Georgetown is not credited onscreen.
       According to an undated article in Screen International, Paramount executive Al Lo Presti spent nearly a year researching projection equipment in U.S. theaters in order to develop a 3-D lens and projection system exclusively for the studio. The 27 Sep 1982 issue of Forbes magazine reported that Gale Weaver, owner of Sirius II Corp., visited the set of Friday the 13th—Part III, and heard producer Frank Mancuso, Jr.’s complaint that faulty projection lenses inhibited filmmakers from distributing pictures in 3-D. In fourteen days, Weaver developed a prototype lens that would be adaptable to “almost all theater projectors.” Sirius II Corp. received $1 million to manufacture the lenses as a joint venture with Paramount.
       On 10 Aug 1982, DV stated that, after leasing two 3-Depix cameras to Jason Prods. for Friday the 13th—Part III, Marks Polarized Corp. filed a $25 million suit against Paramount, alleging that the studio was monopolizing the marketing of 3-D exhibition materials, as well as providing deductions to theaters choosing to lease projection lenses directly from Paramount. Although Paramount agreed to credit Marks Polarized Corp. onscreen with the statement, “Filmed utilizing the Marks 3-Depix® Converter,” the camera company was denied an injunction which would have required the studio to change its equipment policy.
       Screen International stated that Friday the 13th—Part III was the first 3-D film to ever receive a wide domestic release, opening on 1,079 screens. 813 of those screens were 3-D-capable, while the remainder consisted of drive-in theaters, unable to showcase the special format. The 31 Aug 1982 DV reported that Paramount spent about $2 million on the conversions—“an amount equal to the picture’s entire negative cost”—which were completed over seven weeks prior to the film’s 13 Aug 1982 opening. To ensure these lenses were used overseas, Paramount scheduled a 2 Sep 1982 meeting with United International Pictures (UIP) distribution executives in New York City, which would include a screening of the film, along with a seminar about the studio’s marketing and distribution strategies. A second meeting would take place in London, England, on 15 Sep 1982, with publicity managers from nine foreign territories. Although international release dates would not be set until after the London meeting, Screen International claimed that Lo Presti planned to travel to other European and Asian markets to help “prepare” theater exhibitors for the 3-D release. The film was expected to open in Japan first, before expanding one territory at a time; Paramount would wait until enough theaters had adapted to the studio’s projection method so the film could open nationally in each country, not just in major cities. Along with the seminars, Paramount prepared a videotaped manual for projectionists.
       Following the picture’s domestic opening, the 8 Sep 1982 HR stated that Alvin Marks, founder of Marks Polarized Corp., obtained New York State Supreme Court restraining order against company president Mortimer Marks, who attempted to call an “illegal” stockholders meeting to take over the company. According to the article, Mortimer Marks staged the plan because of the company’s increased revenue from the manufacture of 3-D glasses for Friday the 13th—Part III.
       Despite largely negative reviews, a 16 Jan 1983 LAT news item reported that Friday the 13th—Part III had “broken even” and earned “about $40 million” during its initial theatrical release.
       On 7 Oct 1985, DV reported that Stereovision International filed a “restraint-of-trade suit” against Paramount, claiming that the studio negotiated with theaters to prevent the use of Stereovision’s 3-D glasses and lenses, because Stereovision was not able to provide sufficient equipment for all 800 theaters planned in the initial release. According to a 23 May 1986 HR news story, Paramount won the case against Stereovision, although an attorney for the company was planning to re-file the suit.
       A 1 Aug 1989 HR box office report stated that the film collected $9.6 million during its opening weekend, and a $36.7 million total gross to date.
       Preceding the film’s release in Aug 1982, Tower & Leisure Sales Co. published a novelization of the movie, written by Michael Avallone, with contributions from screenwriters Martin Kitrosser and Carol Watson. The Friday the 13th franchise continued after the financial success of Friday the 13th—Part III, including five additional theatrical sequels, a series of young adult novels, comic books, and a remake of Friday the 13th (2009, see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1982
p. 1, 10.
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1982.
---
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1985.
---
Forbes
27 Sep 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1982
p. 3, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1982
p. 1, 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Aug 1982
p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jan 1983.
---
New York Times
13 Aug 1982
p. 4.
Screen International
---
Variety
11 Aug 1982
p. 20.
Variety
11 Aug 1982
p. 4, 32.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Jason Inc./Frank Mancuso Jr. Production
A Steve Miner Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key gaffer
Key grip
Still photog
Louma crane tech
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
3-D cam tech
Elec best boy
Lamp op
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Cam equip by
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Asst cost
MUSIC
Mus ed
Title theme wrt by
Title theme wrt by
Title theme prod by
Available On Records and Tapes
Title theme prod by
Available On Records and Tapes
Music, post prod, creative sd by
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Sd eff ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Tech adv
Main titles by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Spec visual makeup eff des and created by
Spec visual makeup eff des and created by
Spec visual makeup eff des and created by
Spec visual makeup eff des and created by
Asst makeup
Asst makeup
Asst makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to prod
Craft service
First aid
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Miner
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver/Generator op
Insert car driver
Prod payroll, services, and facilities provided by
Caterer
Prod payroll, services, and facilities provided by
Prod payroll, services, and facilities provided by
Tony's Food Service
Prod payroll, services, and facilities provided by
Tony's Food Service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based upon characters created by Victor Miller and Ron Kurz.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Friday the 13th -- Part 3
Friday the 13th -- III
Friday the 13th, Part III
Friday the 13th Part 3
Friday the 13th Part III
Release Date:
13 August 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 13 August 1982
Copyright Claimant:
Jason Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 November 1982
Copyright Number:
PA155585
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26764
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a summer night, a young woman named Ginny Fields runs away from a pursuer through the forest and into a cabin. Inside, she finds the rotting head of an old woman sitting atop a sweater. She dons the sweater as her attacker breaks down the door, wielding a pickaxe and wearing a sack over his head. Ginny addresses him as “Jason,” and pretends to be his mother. Jason imagines his mother’s disembodied head speaking to him, ordering him to kneel. Just before Ginny chops off his head with a knife, he slices her leg open, and a young man pulls Jason away. The girl strikes Jason on the back of his neck, and he collapses. After the man leads Ginny out of the cabin, Jason crawls away. In the small town of Crystal Lake, a woman watches a television news report about eight people who were murdered on the local campgrounds. Ginny, the only survivor, has been taken to the hospital. A few minutes later, Jason appears outside the house and stabs the woman and her husband, Harold. One sunny afternoon, a group of suburban teenagers discuss their upcoming trip to the cabin of their female friend, Chris, when a boy named Shelly sneaks up on them with a mask and rubber knife. Shelly’s roommate, Andy, scolds him for behaving immaturely and encourages him to be himself to impress his date, Vera. When Vera joins them, Shelly apologizes for his appearance. Chris sees smoke emitting from her van, and they discover their two friends, Chuck and Chili, inside, smoking marijuana. As Chris drives, Debbie reveals that she is pregnant with Andy’s child. When they hear police sirens behind ... +


On a summer night, a young woman named Ginny Fields runs away from a pursuer through the forest and into a cabin. Inside, she finds the rotting head of an old woman sitting atop a sweater. She dons the sweater as her attacker breaks down the door, wielding a pickaxe and wearing a sack over his head. Ginny addresses him as “Jason,” and pretends to be his mother. Jason imagines his mother’s disembodied head speaking to him, ordering him to kneel. Just before Ginny chops off his head with a knife, he slices her leg open, and a young man pulls Jason away. The girl strikes Jason on the back of his neck, and he collapses. After the man leads Ginny out of the cabin, Jason crawls away. In the small town of Crystal Lake, a woman watches a television news report about eight people who were murdered on the local campgrounds. Ginny, the only survivor, has been taken to the hospital. A few minutes later, Jason appears outside the house and stabs the woman and her husband, Harold. One sunny afternoon, a group of suburban teenagers discuss their upcoming trip to the cabin of their female friend, Chris, when a boy named Shelly sneaks up on them with a mask and rubber knife. Shelly’s roommate, Andy, scolds him for behaving immaturely and encourages him to be himself to impress his date, Vera. When Vera joins them, Shelly apologizes for his appearance. Chris sees smoke emitting from her van, and they discover their two friends, Chuck and Chili, inside, smoking marijuana. As Chris drives, Debbie reveals that she is pregnant with Andy’s child. When they hear police sirens behind them, the group tries to hide the marijuana by eating it, but realize the officers are speeding past them toward Harold’s house. Chris nervously watches as paramedics remove two bodies on gurneys. The teens then encounter a sleeping man in the middle of the road, who shows them an eyeball that he found earlier that day. Jumping back in the van, the friends drive toward the cabin. Inside, a man named Rick grabs Chris and kisses her, but she asks him to slow down, since she has not seen him for many months. As Rick helps Chris lift hay into the barn loft, someone inside the house screams. Chris returns to find Shelly in the closet with a toy axe through his head, covered in blood makeup. Realizing the prank, Chris becomes upset and takes a walk with Deb, admitting that she is anxious after a terrible incident that occurred the previous summer. Meanwhile, Vera and Shelly borrow Rick’s car and go to the store, where they encounter three members of a motorcycle gang who attempt to steal Shelly’s wallet. When Shelly accidentally backs the car into their motorcycles, one of the bikers, Ali, shatters the car windshield. Upon seeing his wrecked car, Rick decides to leave, but Chris begs to accompany him. While their friends swim in the lake, the bikers arrive at the cabin and drain the gasoline from the group’s van. Inside the barn, a previously unseen killer stabs two of the bikers, Fox and Loco, with pitchforks, and chops off Ali’s arm. That night, sitting near a stream, Rick asks Chris why she returned to the camp, and she claims that she wanted to “prove something to herself.” Inside, Shelly admits to Vera that she has developed feelings for her, but she rejects him and steps outside. Meanwhile, Chris tells Rick about a night she was angry with her parents and ran into the woods; she was attacked by a “hideous-looking, almost inhuman” man, wielding a knife. She says the man dragged her body across the ground and she blacked out before waking up in her own bed, with no acknowledgement of the incident from her parents. After finishing her story, Rick’s car battery dies, forcing them to walk back to the cabin. While Chuck uses the bathroom, he believes he hears Shelly entering the barn. He and Chili investigate, but realize that Shelly is not the intruder. Meanwhile, Shelly hides under the dock and grabs Vera’s foot, causing her to become angry. He walks away and follows Chili and Chuck into the barn. When Vera realizes she still has Shelly’s wallet, she accidentally drops it into the pond and wades into the water to retrieve it. Jason appears, wearing a hockey mask, and shoots her through the eyeball with a harpoon. Inside the house, Debbie and Andy make love. Afterward, Jason murders Andy while Debbie takes a shower. Just as Debbie finds her lover’s body suspended from a ceiling rafter, the killer stabs her through the chest. Meanwhile, Chuck is murdered while attempting to fix an electrical outage in the cabin’s storage room. Shelly collapses before Chili in the kitchen, his throat sliced open, which Chili mistakes for another prank. As she realizes he is truly dead, Jason stabs her with a hot poker. When Rick and Chris return, the killer crushes Rick’s skull, popping his eyeball out of his head. Chris finds the bathtub full of bloody clothes and water, and discovers the bodies of one of the bikers outside. As she screams for Rick, Jason throws her boyfriend’s body through the window and chases her upstairs. Hiding in a closet, she discovers Deb’s body, pulls a knife from the corpse’s back, and stabs Jason in the leg. She uses a chair to break a bedroom window and attempts to jump out, but he grabs her jacket. The fabric rips, and she falls to the ground. Chris drives the van across a nearby bridge, where the vehicle runs out of gasoline and the back tires become stuck in the wooden planks. Unable to continue, she returns to the barn and hides in the loft. After striking Jason on the head with a shovel, she ties his neck with rope and hangs him. When she goes downstairs, however, Jason revives and lifts his mask, revealing that he is the same disfigured man who attacked her the previous summer. Ali jumps out from the darkness and attempts to kill Jason, but Jason stabs him. Chris plunges an axe into Jason’s forehead, and he collapses. The girl gets into a canoe and falls asleep on the lake. When she awakens the next morning, she sees Jason, his face bloodied, in the upstairs window of the house. She turns again and realizes the man is gone, but the corpse of Jason’s mother springs from the pond and drags Chris under the water. Later, three police officers retrieve Chris from the cabin, still alive. They believe that she imagined the lady in the lake, since they find Jason’s dead body lying in the barn. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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