Silent Rage (1982)

R | 100 mins | Horror, Science fiction | 2 April 1982

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HISTORY

       Actress Katey Sagal performed the song, “It’s The Time For Love,” but onscreen credits misspell her name as “Katie Sagal.”
       The 17 Jul 1981 HR announced that Chuck Norris and personal manager Mike Emery signed a deal to produce Silent Rage through their company, Topkick Productions, along with producer Anthony B. Unger. According to the 22 Jul 1981 HR, Unger’s Silent Movie Company arranged for the film to be distributed by Columbia Pictures. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicated that Miller prepared for production by researching genetic engineering with doctors from the University of California, Los Angeles.
       The 28 Aug 1981 HR production charts announced that principal photography began 27 Jul 1981 in Dallas, TX. Production notes added that the picture was filmed on a $4.5 million budget. One stunt-heavy scene at Dallas’ Ol’ Blues Bar took four days to shoot, one of which was spent installing a special glass window that Norris was required to smash in one take.
       Although the 14 Aug 1981 HR named Chuck Norris’ son, Michael Norris, as second assistant director, he is credited as “production assistant.” The 17 Aug 1981 HR stated that the Silent Rage stunt team had previously worked with the film’s star on The Octagon (1980, see entry), under his brother, stunt coordinator and associate producer Aaron Norris. A 1 Sep 1981 Var brief listed John Reidling among the cast, but he is not credited onscreen.
       The 14 Sep 1981 HR stated that principal photography completed 11 Sep 1981, on schedule and under budget.
      End credits include ... More Less

       Actress Katey Sagal performed the song, “It’s The Time For Love,” but onscreen credits misspell her name as “Katie Sagal.”
       The 17 Jul 1981 HR announced that Chuck Norris and personal manager Mike Emery signed a deal to produce Silent Rage through their company, Topkick Productions, along with producer Anthony B. Unger. According to the 22 Jul 1981 HR, Unger’s Silent Movie Company arranged for the film to be distributed by Columbia Pictures. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicated that Miller prepared for production by researching genetic engineering with doctors from the University of California, Los Angeles.
       The 28 Aug 1981 HR production charts announced that principal photography began 27 Jul 1981 in Dallas, TX. Production notes added that the picture was filmed on a $4.5 million budget. One stunt-heavy scene at Dallas’ Ol’ Blues Bar took four days to shoot, one of which was spent installing a special glass window that Norris was required to smash in one take.
       Although the 14 Aug 1981 HR named Chuck Norris’ son, Michael Norris, as second assistant director, he is credited as “production assistant.” The 17 Aug 1981 HR stated that the Silent Rage stunt team had previously worked with the film’s star on The Octagon (1980, see entry), under his brother, stunt coordinator and associate producer Aaron Norris. A 1 Sep 1981 Var brief listed John Reidling among the cast, but he is not credited onscreen.
       The 14 Sep 1981 HR stated that principal photography completed 11 Sep 1981, on schedule and under budget.
      End credits include the statement: “Filmed entirely on location in Texas. Portions of this film shot at the Wadley Institute of Molecular Medicine in Dallas. Technical consultant—Arthur P. Bolton, PHD. Special thanks to Jeffrey C. Ingber.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1981
p. 46.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1982
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
2 Apr 1982
p. 10.
New York Times
2 Apr 1982
p. 8.
Variety
1 Sep 1981.
---
Variety
7 Apr 1982
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
An Anthony B. Unger/Topkick Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Gaffer
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Best boy
Best boy
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
Const coord
Swingman
Swingman
Painter
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Costumer
Costumer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd boom man
Sd cable man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles des by
Spec eff supv
Asst spec eff
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
Spec eff makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc auditor
Asst auditor
Transportation capt
Co-capt
Co-capt
Casting
Press agent
Asst to the prod
Prod coord
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Post prod projectionist
Loc prod services provided by
Loc casting
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's The Time For Love," music and lyrics by Morgan Stoddard, performed by Katie Sagal.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 April 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 2 April 1982
Production Date:
27 July--11 September 1981 in Dallas, TX
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 April 1982
Copyright Number:
PA135002
Physical Properties:
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26565
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a house in small-town Texas, a mentally ill man named John Kirby awakens, sweaty and shaking, when his landlady, Mrs. Sims, summons him to the telephone. He speaks briefly with his psychiatrist, Dr. Tom Halman, about his increasingly unstable condition before retreating to the backyard and picking up an axe, which he uses to hack through Mrs. Sims’s bedroom door. She attempts to escape through the window, but he pulls her inside and kills her. Hearing the victim’s screams, police sheriff Dan Stevens enters the house and attacks Kirby, chasing him out the window and into a field.
Dan handcuffs Kirby and arrests him, but just then, Tom arrives to claim responsibility for his patient. Inside the patrol car, Kirby breaks free of his handcuffs and attempts to escape, forcing other police officers to shoot him until he is incapacitated. At a scientific research institute, Tom and genetic engineers Dr. Philip Spires and Dr. Paul Vaughn perform surgery that just barely saves Kirby’s life. Hoping to accelerate his recovery, Dr. Spires injects the patient with a dose of an untested chemical formula. Although the substance revives Kirby to full health, Tom remains hesitant about the results and informs Dan that Kirby has died. In the hallway, Dan runs into his former girl friend, Tom’s sister, Alison Halman. When she offers to drive Dan to the police station, the two rekindle their romance by returning to his house to make love. The next day, Dan chases a gang of tough-talking motorcyclists away from his inept and timid deputy, Charlie. After the encounter, Charlie wonders if he is unsuited for law enforcement, but Dan encourages him to continue trying. At ... +


In a house in small-town Texas, a mentally ill man named John Kirby awakens, sweaty and shaking, when his landlady, Mrs. Sims, summons him to the telephone. He speaks briefly with his psychiatrist, Dr. Tom Halman, about his increasingly unstable condition before retreating to the backyard and picking up an axe, which he uses to hack through Mrs. Sims’s bedroom door. She attempts to escape through the window, but he pulls her inside and kills her. Hearing the victim’s screams, police sheriff Dan Stevens enters the house and attacks Kirby, chasing him out the window and into a field.
Dan handcuffs Kirby and arrests him, but just then, Tom arrives to claim responsibility for his patient. Inside the patrol car, Kirby breaks free of his handcuffs and attempts to escape, forcing other police officers to shoot him until he is incapacitated. At a scientific research institute, Tom and genetic engineers Dr. Philip Spires and Dr. Paul Vaughn perform surgery that just barely saves Kirby’s life. Hoping to accelerate his recovery, Dr. Spires injects the patient with a dose of an untested chemical formula. Although the substance revives Kirby to full health, Tom remains hesitant about the results and informs Dan that Kirby has died. In the hallway, Dan runs into his former girl friend, Tom’s sister, Alison Halman. When she offers to drive Dan to the police station, the two rekindle their romance by returning to his house to make love. The next day, Dan chases a gang of tough-talking motorcyclists away from his inept and timid deputy, Charlie. After the encounter, Charlie wonders if he is unsuited for law enforcement, but Dan encourages him to continue trying. At the institute laboratory, Dr. Vaughn leads Tom to a restricted area containing Kirby’s body, which has been undergoing rapid recovery since he was given the experimental formula. To demonstrate its effect, Dr. Spires cuts through Kirby’s chest with a scalpel, and the wound heals instantly. When Tom continues to object to the formula’s use, Dr. Spires orders him to leave. While driving with Charlie later that afternoon, Dan recognizes the gang’s motorcycles parked outside a bar and decides to investigate. As one of the female bikers flirts with Charlie, Dan fights the remaining members, eventually knocking them all unconscious. After spending an idyllic afternoon with Alison, Dan proposes that they visit his cabin for the weekend, and takes her home so she can pack. Meanwhile, Tom returns home and greets his wife, Nancy, who then leaves to pick up a pizza. While she is away, Kirby escapes the hospital and breaks into the Halman household. He attacks Tom in his photography lab, prompting Tom to throw chemicals in his face while he searches for his gun. Although Tom shoots him multiple times, Kirby remains unharmed by the bullets and eventually kills the doctor. Sometime later, Nancy returns and finds her husband’s body on the floor. Upon seeing Kirby, she runs to the bedroom and locks herself in the attic stairwell. Once she believes the killer has left, she tentatively emerges from the room, but Kirby smashes her head against the wall. After Alison arrives at the house to collect her belongings, she finds Nancy and Tom’s bodies and runs screaming to the front door, where she bumps into Dan. As he consoles her, Kirby escapes and returns to the laboratory. Dr. Spires and Dr. Vaughn marvel at the healing rate of Kirby’s would-be fatal bullet wounds, but worry about how he may have sustained them. Later, Dan informs Dr. Spires about Kirby’s death, and the doctor quietly deduces that Kirby must be responsible. Too frightened to stay in her brother’s house alone, Alison decides to sleep in his office at the institute. Dr. Spires insists on observing Kirby’s mutated cellular structure, but Dr. Vaughn, morally compromised by his role in causing Kirby’s murderous behavior, euthanizes the patient. A few minutes later, Kirby revives and kills Paul. Meanwhile, Charlie watches over Alison while Dan stops by the coroner’s office. On his way back to the laboratory, Dr. Spires discovers Dr. Vaughn’s body. Traumatized, he returns to his office and encounters Kirby, but as he attempts to embrace him, Kirby snaps his neck. After Charlie and Alison hear Kirby attacking another doctor, Charlie attempts to attack while Alison escapes, but Kirby injures him. Dan returns to the hospital to find more of Kirby’s victims, including Charlie, who dies in his arms. When Kirby corners Alison in Dr. Spires’s office, Dan shoots him repeatedly, sending him crashing through the window. Uninjured by the fall, he fights Dan until Alison hits him with Dan’s patrol car. As the couple drive away, Kirby grabs onto the bumper and climbs through the rear window, but Dan and Alison jump out of the vehicle moments before Kirby steers it over a cliff. The truck explodes upon impact and Kirby runs into a nearby pond to extinguish his burning body. He emerges fully recovered and resumes his fight with Dan, who throws him down a well. Believing that the danger is over, Dan embraces Alison and they return home, but far below the earth’s surface, Kirby’s head bursts free from the water. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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