Tempest (1982)

PG | 140 or 142 mins | Comedy-drama | 13 August 1982

Director:

Paul Mazursky

Producer:

Paul Mazursky

Cinematographers:

Don McAlpine, Zoli Vidor

Editor:

Donn Cambern

Production Designer:

Pato Guzman

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures
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HISTORY


       Although the songs are not listed onscreen, the film includes excerpts from Herman Hupfeld’s “As Time Goes By,” Fred Ebb and John Kander’s “New York, New York,” and Levy Morris and Frank Lymon’s “Why Do Fools Fall In Love.” The character “Miranda Dimitrious” also watches clips from the television show Gunsmoke (CBS, 10 Sep 1955—1 Sep 1975).
       According to a 13 Aug 1982 LAHExam article, writer-producer-director Paul Mazursky wrote his first treatment of The Tempest in 1971, hoping to create a successful project following the poor reception of his film, Alex in Wonderland (1970, see entry). Although the story originated as an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s 1623 play, The Tempest, at this point, Mazursky hoped to diverge from the original work while retaining the playwright’s language. As Mazursky worked on various other feature films, Leon Capetanos edited the screenplay. Mazursky then wrote two additional drafts, which included modifications to Shakespeare’s characters and story to better fit the contemporary setting.
       On 26 Aug 1980, DV announced that Mazursky signed a deal with Columbia Pictures after Twentieth Century-Fox turned down the project. As reported in the 21 Jan 1981 DV, Gena Rowlands was likely required to pass on a role in Neil Simon’s I Ought to Be in Pictures (1982, see entry) in order to honor her commitment to star in Tempest alongside her real-life husband, John Cassavettes. The 3 Aug 1981 DV claimed that characters resembling Richard Nixon, Barbara Streisand, and George Burns were intended to be included in the film, but the only celebrity doppelganger to ... More Less


       Although the songs are not listed onscreen, the film includes excerpts from Herman Hupfeld’s “As Time Goes By,” Fred Ebb and John Kander’s “New York, New York,” and Levy Morris and Frank Lymon’s “Why Do Fools Fall In Love.” The character “Miranda Dimitrious” also watches clips from the television show Gunsmoke (CBS, 10 Sep 1955—1 Sep 1975).
       According to a 13 Aug 1982 LAHExam article, writer-producer-director Paul Mazursky wrote his first treatment of The Tempest in 1971, hoping to create a successful project following the poor reception of his film, Alex in Wonderland (1970, see entry). Although the story originated as an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s 1623 play, The Tempest, at this point, Mazursky hoped to diverge from the original work while retaining the playwright’s language. As Mazursky worked on various other feature films, Leon Capetanos edited the screenplay. Mazursky then wrote two additional drafts, which included modifications to Shakespeare’s characters and story to better fit the contemporary setting.
       On 26 Aug 1980, DV announced that Mazursky signed a deal with Columbia Pictures after Twentieth Century-Fox turned down the project. As reported in the 21 Jan 1981 DV, Gena Rowlands was likely required to pass on a role in Neil Simon’s I Ought to Be in Pictures (1982, see entry) in order to honor her commitment to star in Tempest alongside her real-life husband, John Cassavettes. The 3 Aug 1981 DV claimed that characters resembling Richard Nixon, Barbara Streisand, and George Burns were intended to be included in the film, but the only celebrity doppelganger to appear onscreen is credited as “Woody Allen lookalike.”
       According to production notes, following two weeks of rehearsal, the fifteen-week production schedule began 20 Jul 1981 in Atlantic City, NJ, at the abandoned construction site of the Dunes Casino and the Bally Park Place Hotel. The following three weeks were spent in New York City, during which time the production closed down much of the city’s theater district to accommodate filming. Other locations included the Convent of the Sacred Heart, the Westside Highway next to the World Trade Center, a Greenwich Village apartment, MacArthur Park in Long Island, NY, a Greek coffee shop in Astoria, NY, and the Vascular Diagnostic Center in Flushing, NY. On 14 Aug 1981, the production moved for a week to the port of Piraeus and Plastiras Square, in Athens, Greece, before relocating to the Peloponnesus region of Mari, Alypa beach, and the town of Gythion. Mazursky stated that he had previously scouted coastal locations in Sicily, Italy, Yugoslavia, and Malta, but ultimately decided to film the picture in Greece. One week of principal photography was spent filming onboard a yacht. The crew then moved to the Cinecitta Studios in Rome, Italy. The 3 Jan 1982 LAT stated that the foreign studio location was chosen to limit costs on the picture’s $13 million budget. Although the 17 Aug 1981 DV claimed that storm sequences were created in New York City, production notes stated that filmmakers shot the scene on Stage 12 during the final week of filming, using computer controlled cameras, projection equipment, and live smoke effects. A 2 Nov 1981 Columbia press release announced that principal photography had been completed that day.
       Shortly after production began, the 6 Aug 1981 DV “Film Assignments” listed Zoli Vidor as director of photography, but Don McAlpine is credited onscreen.
       The film marked the motion picture debut of actors Molly Ringwald, Sam Robards, and Mazursky’s wife, Betsy Mazursky. Tempest was Mazursky’s third collaboration with editor Donn Cambern, and his sixth feature film with production designer Pato Guzman, who also served as co-producer.
       During post production, the 19 May 1982 Var stated that Mazursky had spent time in Tokyo, Japan, earlier that year to work on the film’s score with composer Stomu Yamashata. Release was originally scheduled for fall or winter 1982.
       A 14 Jul 1982 Columbia press release listed the West Coast benefit premiere for 10 Aug 1982, in Hollywood, CA. According to the 17 Aug 1982 HR, the New York City premiere took place 15 Aug 1982 at the Cinema 5 Theater. LAHExam stated that following Tempest’s 13 Aug 1982 opening in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, Columbia planned a national release the following month.
       The film earned Golden Globe nominations for Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Raul Julia, and New Star of the Year in a Motion Picture – Molly Ringwald.
      Mimicking the curtain call of a stage play, cast credits are superimposed over footage of each character emerging from the doorway of a Greek building and bowing to the audience. End credits list art pieces used as set decoration in the film’s New Year’s Eve party sequence as follows: “‘Dancing,’ by George Segal, courtesy of the Sidney Janis Gallery; ‘Carved Panel Rangitania,’ by Ben Nicholson, courtesy of Gimpel and Weitzenhoffer Gallery; ‘Vase,’ by Larry Poons © 1978; ‘T-Bone Blues,' by Larry Poons © 1976; ‘Untitled,' by Larry Poons © 1980; All courtesy of Paul Jenkins Collection; ‘Turn About,’ by Kenneth Noland © 1981; ‘Red Upturn,’ by Kenneth Noland © 1981; ‘Afresh,’ by Kenneth Noland © 1981; ‘Cote d’Argent,’ by Helen Frankenthaler © 1981; All courtesy of Andre Emmerich Gallery"; and, “‘Booster,” by Robert Rauschenberg © 1967; ‘Maid of the Mist,” by Helen Frankenthaler © 1974, courtesy of the Paul Jenkins Collection; ‘Phenomena Drawn on the Wind,” by Paul Jenkins © 1981; ‘Phenomena Zig Zag at Times Square,’ by Paul Jenkins © 1981; ‘Manhattan Collages,’ by Paul Jenkins © 1981; All courtesy of the Gimpel and Weitzenhoffer Gallery.”

              End credits also include “Thanks to Mike Stoller for ‘Tango Del Fuego,' and the following acknowledgements: “Tonight Show clip courtesy of Carson Productions, Inc."; “Cinecitta, S. P. A. Rome"; “Paul Segal & Associates, New York City"; “Vascular Diagnostic Associates, P. C., Flushing, New York"; and “Bally’s Park Place Casino/Hotel, Atlantic City, N. J.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Aug 1980.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1981.
---
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1981.
---
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1981
p. 7.
Daily Variety
17 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 1981
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1982
p. 3, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1982.
---
LAHExam
13 Aug 1982.
Section D, p. 1, 3, 5.
Los Angeles Times
3 Jan 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Aug 1982
p. 1, 13.
New York Times
13 Aug 1982
p. 8.
Variety
19 May 1982.
---
Variety
11 Aug 1982
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
Paul Mazursky's production of
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York
2d asst dir, New York
D.G.A. trainee, New York
Prod mgr, Greece
2d asst dir, Greece
2d asst dir, Greece
2d unit dir, Greece
2d unit asst dir, Greece
Prod mgr, Rome
1st asst dir, Rome
2d asst dir, Rome
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam, New York
2d asst cam, New York
Gaffer, New York
Key grip, New York
Still photog, New York
2d unit cam, Greece
1st asst cam, Greece
2d asst cam, Greece
1st asst cam, Greece and Rome
Gaffer, Greece and Rome
Gaffer, Greece and Rome
Key grip, Greece and Rome
Still photog, Greece and Rome
Asst op, Rome
Dir of photog
Steadicam op
Best boy
Generator op
Const grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, New York
Art dir, Greece and Rome
Storyboard artist, Hollywood
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed, New York
Apprentice film ed, New York
Asst film ed, Rome
Asst film ed, Rome
Apprentice film ed, Hollywood
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, New York
Prop master, New York
Prop master, Greece and Rome
Set dec, Greece and Rome
Set dec
Asst prop master
Steadicam op
Shop craftsman
Scenic chargeman
Scenic artist
Shopman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer, New York
Women's costumer, New York
Ward, Greece
Ward, Greece and Rome
MUSIC
Mus ed, Hollywood
Orch and arrangements
Mus performed by
Mus performed by
SOUND
Prod mixer
Sd boom
Sd rec, Rome
Supv sd eff ed, Hollywood
Sd ed, Hollywood
Sd ed, Hollywood
Sd ed, Hollywood
Re-rec mixer, Hollywood
Re-rec mixer, Hollywood
Re-rec mixer, Hollywood
Asst sd eff ed, Hollywood
Asst sd eff ed, Hollywood
ADR ed, Hollywood
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff by
Spec eff, Greece and Rome
Spec eff, Greece and Rome
Visual eff asst, Greece and Rome
Visual eff asst, Greece and Rome
Spec eff, Rome
Main title des by
Spec optical eff by
New York
End credits and opticals by
DANCE
Choreog, Greece and Rome
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup, New York
Makeup, Greece
Makeup, Greece and Rome
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Mazursky
Asst to Mr. Bernhardt
Exec asst
Prod asst
Auditor
Unit pub
Prod office coord, New York
Transportation capt, New York
Studio teacher, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod asst, New York
Prod consultant, Greece
Loc mgr, Greece
Prod coord, Greece
Cashier, Greece
Studio teacher, Greece and Rome
Animal trainer, Greece and Rome
Asst prod mgr, Rome
Accountant, Rome
Prod secy, Rome
Asst auditor
Extras casting
STAND INS
Stuntman
Stunt coord, New York
Stunt coord, Rome
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
Adapted from the play The Tempest by William Shakespeare (London, ca. 1611, published 1623).
MUSIC
"Tango," by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, courtesy of A & M Records.
SONGS
"Whip It," performed by Devo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc. and Virgin Records
"Little Girls," performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of A & M Records
"New York, New York," courtesy of United Artists Corporation, special thanks to Liza Minnelli
+
SONGS
"Whip It," performed by Devo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc. and Virgin Records
"Little Girls," performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of A & M Records
"New York, New York," courtesy of United Artists Corporation, special thanks to Liza Minnelli
"Manhattan," performed by Dinah Washington, courtesy of PolyGram Records, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 August 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 10 August 1982
New York City premiere: 15 August 1982
Los Angeles and New York openings: 13 August 1982
Production Date:
20 July--2 November 1981 in Atlantic City, NJ
New York City
Greece
and Rome, Italy
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 August 1982
Copyright Number:
PA147821
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
140 or 142
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26564
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As the sun rises over Greece, American architect Phillip Dimitrious awakens next to his small dog, Nino, on the rocky bluff outside his island home, where his lover, Aretha Tomalin, sits in bed. She emerges on the balcony to greet him before descending to the kitchen to prepare breakfast. Later that morning, Phillip’s shy fifteen-year-old daughter, Miranda, swims topless in the ocean, unaware she is being watched by the island’s guide and resident hermit, Kalibanos. When Nino chases the voyeur away, Kalibanos bumps into Phillip, who threatens him for spying on her. Eighteen months earlier, in New York City, Phillip moans about attending a lavish New Years Eve party hosted by his boss, casino owner Alberto Alonzo, with Miranda and his wife, former thespian Antonia Dimitrious. Inside, Alonzo teases him about his dour attitude, and Miranda is appalled by his lack of pop cultural awareness. The next morning, Phillip is awakened by a nightmare of Antonia and Miranda drowning in the ocean, and Antonia announces she has decided to return to acting by accepting a role in a comedy play. At the site of his next casino construction project in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Phillip envisions himself jumping off the side of the building and suddenly declares his intent to resign, but Alonzo prohibits him from breaking his contract. Onboard his private airplane, the ill and aging Alonzo encourages Phillip to find a younger woman to alieve his mid-life crisis. Early one morning, Phillip announces his intention to travel the world, prompting Antonia to ask if he still loves her. Although he claims that he “cares” about her, his temper rises and he blurts out, “I hate you!” Later, ... +


As the sun rises over Greece, American architect Phillip Dimitrious awakens next to his small dog, Nino, on the rocky bluff outside his island home, where his lover, Aretha Tomalin, sits in bed. She emerges on the balcony to greet him before descending to the kitchen to prepare breakfast. Later that morning, Phillip’s shy fifteen-year-old daughter, Miranda, swims topless in the ocean, unaware she is being watched by the island’s guide and resident hermit, Kalibanos. When Nino chases the voyeur away, Kalibanos bumps into Phillip, who threatens him for spying on her. Eighteen months earlier, in New York City, Phillip moans about attending a lavish New Years Eve party hosted by his boss, casino owner Alberto Alonzo, with Miranda and his wife, former thespian Antonia Dimitrious. Inside, Alonzo teases him about his dour attitude, and Miranda is appalled by his lack of pop cultural awareness. The next morning, Phillip is awakened by a nightmare of Antonia and Miranda drowning in the ocean, and Antonia announces she has decided to return to acting by accepting a role in a comedy play. At the site of his next casino construction project in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Phillip envisions himself jumping off the side of the building and suddenly declares his intent to resign, but Alonzo prohibits him from breaking his contract. Onboard his private airplane, the ill and aging Alonzo encourages Phillip to find a younger woman to alieve his mid-life crisis. Early one morning, Phillip announces his intention to travel the world, prompting Antonia to ask if he still loves her. Although he claims that he “cares” about her, his temper rises and he blurts out, “I hate you!” Later, he drunkenly interrupts a party for Antonia’s sophisticated theater friends, causing all the guests to leave just as a violent thunderstorm rumbles overhead. After fighting with his wife, Phillip consults his elderly father, who encourages him to take a vacation in Greece. In the present, Miranda and Aretha grow frustrated with the exertion of helping Phillip restore an outdoor amphitheater, but Kalibanos lightens the mood by playing his clarinet. Afterward, the Greek lures Miranda to the cave where he lives by revealing that he has access to a television; once there, Miranda watches an episode of Gunsmoke while he makes futile attempts to seduce her. Disgusted, she storms out, muttering about wanting to experience life as a typical modern teenager. Months earlier, while jogging in New York City, Miranda whines about her lack of independence, but Phillip is distracted by seeing Antonia with Alonzo across the street. Later, Miranda overhears Antonia declare that she wants a divorce, and begs to accompany her father to Greece for the summer. Upon their arrival in Athens, they spot Aretha and Nino on the side of the road and offer them a ride. Aretha speaks about her travels with her two former husbands, but the conversation becomes awkward and she abruptly excuses herself, giving Phillip the key to her apartment. Although she likes Aretha, Miranda calls her father a pervert for considering having sex with her. Late that night, Phillip goes to her apartment to turn down her proposition by claiming that his life is too complicated, but they eventually consummate their new affair. At the end of the first summer, while Phillip attends one of Aretha’s shows as a lounge singer, Antonia and Alonzo unexpectedly arrive to demand Miranda return to New York City. Disapproving of her mother’s continued relationship with Alonzo, Miranda refuses to live with her and agrees to stay with Phillip in Greece. Together, Miranda and Phillip move into the house on the secluded bluff with Aretha and Nino, where they are greeted by Kalibanos yelling from the cliffs. Back in the present, Miranda longs to return to civilization, and Aretha has grown frustrated with Phillip’s unexplained vow of celibacy since arriving on the island, but the two women abandon their anger by singing. One morning, Phillip sees Miranda practicing the tango and imagines she is Antonia. When he tries to force his daughter to dance with him, she calls him “crazy” and stomps away. After hearing about Kalibanos’ amorous advances on Miranda, Phillip knocks him unconscious with a boat paddle, but quickly jumps into the water to save him. Meanwhile, as Antonia and Alonzo spend the rest of their trip aboard Alonzo’s yacht, Antonia considers ending their affair. Alonzo’s teenage son, Freddy, meets Miranda while scuba diving, and she becomes flustered by his obvious attraction to her. Bonding over their American heritage, she asks him about the changing pop culture trends back in the U.S. Upon spotting Alonzo’s boat, Kalibanos excitedly informs Phillip, who recognizes the travelers. Lifting his arms to the sky, Phillip “summons” a violent storm that throws Alonzo and his guests overboard. Once the rain passes, Phillip begrudgingly assists Aretha, Miranda, and Freddy in retrieving the shipwrecked passengers. When Miranda and Freddy ascend to the attic to restore power to the extinguished lights, he kisses her. Phillip slaughters one of Kalibanos’ pet goats to eat, and Aretha encourages him to resolve his conflict with Antonia. As members of the group dance, Phillip approaches his wife to ask for her forgiveness, and they join their friends in a waltz, declaring their mutual love. The next morning, the Dimitrious family returns to New York City. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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