Young Doctors in Love (1982)

R | 93 or 95-96 mins | Comedy, Satire | 16 July 1982

Director:

Garry Marshall

Producer:

Jerry Bruckheimer

Cinematographer:

Don Peterman

Editor:

Dov Hoenig

Production Designer:

Polly Platt

Production Company:

ABC Motion Pictures
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HISTORY


       Although they are not listed onscreen, the film uses excerpts from the music of Rocky (1976, see entry), composed by Bill Conti, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, see entry), by John Williams. Characters also sing lyrics from the Leo Friedman and Beth Slater Whitson song, “Let Me Call You Sweetheart.”
       End credits are followed by a shot of two confetti-covered ducks entering the empty hospital hallway after the wedding.
       On 13 Oct 1981, NYT announced that ABC Motion Pictures had chosen Young Doctors in Love as one of its first three projects to be developed since the creation of the television corporation’s motion picture branch in 1979. In addition to being the initial project to enter production, the film marked the motion picture directorial debut of television producer Garry Marshall, who created the network’s series, Happy Days (15 Jan 1974—12 Jul 1984) and Mork & Mindy (14 Sep 1978—10 Jun 1982). According to a 13 Dec 1981 LAT article, filmmakers referenced the satire The Hospital (1971, see entry) during preparation. Various contemporary sources estimated the budget between $7—7.5 million.
       Although the 16 Oct 1981 DV predicted a 16 Nov 1981 production start date, the 30 Nov 1981 DV indicated that filming had only begun that day in Los Angeles, CA. A 26 Feb 1982 NYT article indicated that hospital scenes were filmed in the former drug detoxification wing of the Rancho Los Amigos hospital in Downey, CA. The 13 Dec 1981 LAT reported that the second night of the forty-one day ... More Less


       Although they are not listed onscreen, the film uses excerpts from the music of Rocky (1976, see entry), composed by Bill Conti, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, see entry), by John Williams. Characters also sing lyrics from the Leo Friedman and Beth Slater Whitson song, “Let Me Call You Sweetheart.”
       End credits are followed by a shot of two confetti-covered ducks entering the empty hospital hallway after the wedding.
       On 13 Oct 1981, NYT announced that ABC Motion Pictures had chosen Young Doctors in Love as one of its first three projects to be developed since the creation of the television corporation’s motion picture branch in 1979. In addition to being the initial project to enter production, the film marked the motion picture directorial debut of television producer Garry Marshall, who created the network’s series, Happy Days (15 Jan 1974—12 Jul 1984) and Mork & Mindy (14 Sep 1978—10 Jun 1982). According to a 13 Dec 1981 LAT article, filmmakers referenced the satire The Hospital (1971, see entry) during preparation. Various contemporary sources estimated the budget between $7—7.5 million.
       Although the 16 Oct 1981 DV predicted a 16 Nov 1981 production start date, the 30 Nov 1981 DV indicated that filming had only begun that day in Los Angeles, CA. A 26 Feb 1982 NYT article indicated that hospital scenes were filmed in the former drug detoxification wing of the Rancho Los Amigos hospital in Downey, CA. The 13 Dec 1981 LAT reported that the second night of the forty-one day production schedule took place in Venice, CA. The scene shot there, which took place in a brothel and included various celebrity lookalikes, was not included in the final film. The article stated that production designer Polly Platt turned town two other major motion picture projects in order to work with Marshall on Young Doctors in Love.
       In addition, Marshall and producer Jerry Bruckheimer decided to cast then-unknown actors in order to find new comedic talent and save on production costs. Young Doctors in Love marked the theatrically released motion picture debuts of Patrick Collins, Ted McGinley, Michael Richards, Kyle T. Heffner, and Crystal Bernard. It was the first feature film appearance of Taylor Negron, who also starred in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, (see entry), released Aug 1982, and Rick Overton, whose other 1982 production, Airplane II: The Sequel, opened 10 Dec 1982. Early publicity materials in AMPAS library files included Mr. T. among the film’s “soap cameos,” but he does not appear and is not credited onscreen in the theatrical release.
       On 24 Jun 1982, HR announced that Avon publishing would release 500,000 copies of Michael Elias and Rich Eustis’ screenplay to correspond with the film’s national release. The 14 Jul 1982 HR stated that Young Doctors in Love was scheduled to open regionally beginning 16 Jul 1982.
       According to the 21 Oct 1982 HR, the picture grossed $30.5 million in its first nine and a half weeks in theaters. ABC and domestic distributor Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. credited the success to the onscreen “cameo” appearances of popular television soap opera actors, which roused positive responses from test audiences prior to release. A 31 Jul 1982 TV Guide news story advertised that All My Children (ABC, 1970—2011) actress Susan Lucci would be among the cameos, and although the 21 Oct 1982 HR indicated that Lucci was included in a version of the film shown in a Seattle, Washington, test screening, she is not credited onscreen.
       The print viewed for this record had a runtime of ninety-six minutes, but various contemporary reviews also listed durations of ninety-five and ninety-three minutes.
      After “Dr. Simon August” believes “Dr. Stephanie Brody’s” surgery to be unsuccessful, credits begin to scroll up the screen as he walks away, but Simon protests, “No, not now!” and the film resumes. End credits begin again after their wedding ceremony, when Simon looks at the camera and exclaims, “Now!” Cast credits are accompanied by the following voice-over epilogue from an unidentified narrator: “Simon and Stephanie opened the Beverly Hills Clinic in Burnaby Mountain. Stephanie had an operating room built in their house, so now Simon has a place to function. Dr. Milton Chamberlain is head pediatrician at Disneyland. Dr. Bucky DeVol married Julie the prostitute and named their first son after Simon August. They called the kid ‘Peckerhead.’ Dr. Oliver Ludwig moved to Hawaii and became a professional wine taster. Nurse Norine Sprockett was given the Mother Theresa Award as the best nurse in the city. Phil Burns was paroled and is now the head pharmacist for the National Football League. Dr. Walter Rist is trying to date both Nurse Sprockett and tennis player Renée Richards. Dr. Prang retired from medicine and is currently the road manager for The Plasmatics. Malamud was retired by the syndicate and given a gold watch, which exploded in his face. Angelo Bonafetti is now a professional musician playing with the Philadelphia ‘fuckin’ Philharmonic. Ladies and gentlemen, our entire staff wishes you a happy and healthy life, and hopes you never, ever have to stay in City Hospital.”

              End credits include the following acknowledgments: “There were no laser beam effects used in this film"; “Marijuana plants were supplied by City Police Department"; and, “Special Thanks to Gary Menteer, Barbara Sue Wells & Steve A. Dayan.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Oct 1981.
---
Daily Variety
30 Nov 1981.
---
Daily Variety
6 Jan 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1982
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 1982
p. 1, 4.
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1981
p. 44.
Los Angeles Times
19 Jul 1982
p. 6.
New York Times
13 Oct 1981.
---
New York Times
26 Feb 1982.
---
New York Times
17 Jul 1982
p. 14.
TV Guide
31 Jul 1982.
---
Variety
21 Jul 1982
p. 20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
The candystripers:
The gangsters:
Soap cameos:
John Beradino
[and]
The hospital staff:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
ABC Motion Pictures Presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Panaglide op
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Best boy grip
Still photog
Generator op
Grip
Grip
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Draftswoman
Set dec
Prop master
Asst propman
Const coord
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost dept supv
Men`s ward
Men`s ward
Women's ward
Women's ward
Tailor
MUSIC
Orig mus comp and cond by
Asst to Maurice Jarre
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Post prod supv
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Loop ed
Loop ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Asst to the dir
Scr supv
Asst to the exec prod
Secy to the exec prod
Secy to the exec prod
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Extra casting
Extra casting
Prod secy
Pub coord
Loc liaison
Craft serviceman
Celebrity doubles provided by
Video
Video
Marijuana plants were supplied by
Dispatcher
Caterer
Projectionist
Animal trainer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 July 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 July 1982
Production Date:
30 November 1981--late January 1982 in Los Angeles, CA
Downey, CA
and Venice, CA
Copyright Claimant:
ABC Motion Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 August 1982
Copyright Number:
PA148144
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
93 or 95-96
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26645
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Beginning their one-year residency to become doctors, a group of medical interns - psychiatrist Dr. Walter Rist, gynecologist Dr. Thurman Flicker, anesthesiologist Dr. Charles Litto, pediatrician Dr. Milton Chamberlain, sports medicine Dr. Bucky DeVol, and overtired, student loan debt-ridden allergist Dr. Phil Burns - introduce themselves to the intimidating City Hospital administrator, Dr. Joseph Prang. Also among the students are the virtuous Dr. Stephanie Brody from small-town Vermont, and the arrogant yet determined Dr. Simon August from Beverly Hills, California, who intends to become “the greatest surgeon the world has ever known.” When reporting for their first shift just after midnight on New Year’s Day, they find the lobby and emergency room areas in a state of chaos. Meanwhile, organized crime lord Salvatore “Sal” Bonafetti hides in a safehouse with his son, Angelo Bonafetti, to protect himself from rumored assassination attempts by rival Mafia families. When Sal suffers from a stress-induced stroke, Angelo dresses himself and his father in disguises before taking him to the hospital, where they are pursued by an assassin named Malamud. While watching Simon curtly diagnose patients, Stephanie instantly disapproves of his insensitive bedside manner. Later that morning, Malamud finds Sal’s room, but the nurses mistake him for a patient and force him into the neighboring bed, worsening Sal’s paralyzing anxiety. During a training lesson, Simon’s astuteness enrages their supervisor, Dr. Oliver Wendell Ludwig, but impresses Stephanie, who asks him on a date. During dinner that night, Stephanie tells Simon about her hometown community, which funded her medical school education so she could take over her ailing father’s practice. Simon discredits her humble background, causing her to become angry. When she stands up to ... +


Beginning their one-year residency to become doctors, a group of medical interns - psychiatrist Dr. Walter Rist, gynecologist Dr. Thurman Flicker, anesthesiologist Dr. Charles Litto, pediatrician Dr. Milton Chamberlain, sports medicine Dr. Bucky DeVol, and overtired, student loan debt-ridden allergist Dr. Phil Burns - introduce themselves to the intimidating City Hospital administrator, Dr. Joseph Prang. Also among the students are the virtuous Dr. Stephanie Brody from small-town Vermont, and the arrogant yet determined Dr. Simon August from Beverly Hills, California, who intends to become “the greatest surgeon the world has ever known.” When reporting for their first shift just after midnight on New Year’s Day, they find the lobby and emergency room areas in a state of chaos. Meanwhile, organized crime lord Salvatore “Sal” Bonafetti hides in a safehouse with his son, Angelo Bonafetti, to protect himself from rumored assassination attempts by rival Mafia families. When Sal suffers from a stress-induced stroke, Angelo dresses himself and his father in disguises before taking him to the hospital, where they are pursued by an assassin named Malamud. While watching Simon curtly diagnose patients, Stephanie instantly disapproves of his insensitive bedside manner. Later that morning, Malamud finds Sal’s room, but the nurses mistake him for a patient and force him into the neighboring bed, worsening Sal’s paralyzing anxiety. During a training lesson, Simon’s astuteness enrages their supervisor, Dr. Oliver Wendell Ludwig, but impresses Stephanie, who asks him on a date. During dinner that night, Stephanie tells Simon about her hometown community, which funded her medical school education so she could take over her ailing father’s practice. Simon discredits her humble background, causing her to become angry. When she stands up to leave, however, she doubles over in fleeting abdominal pain, destroying the restaurant’s outdoor patio tent. At the hospital the next day, the nurses find a patient file belonging to another “Malamud” and erroneously prepare the assassin for surgery to remove one of his kidneys. While observing a patient, Simon expresses his interest in continuing his relationship with Stephanie, but they agree to remain professional. After receiving a raunchy prank love letter from someone he believes was the uptight Nurse Norine Sprockett, Phil Burns flirts with her in order to gain access to stimulant medications from the locked prescription cabinet. Angelo continues visiting his father Sal in the hospital while dressed as a woman named “Angela.” On Valentine’s Day, Simon runs into Stephanie teaching a community dance class, and confronts her about her suddenly cold attitude toward him, hoping to make amends. When Stephanie once again collapses in pain, Simon tricks her into collecting a saliva sample, which he sends to Dr. Ludwig to run tests for a rare and fatal disease. Impressed with Simon’s intelligence and attitude, Dr. Prang invites him to prove his surgical capabilities by performing an appendix removal. One day, a man codenamed “Vanilla” asks to buy medication from Phil, prompting the doctor to continue courting Nurse Sprockett, who has transformed her appearance to make herself more attractive. In July, Malamud complains about the many unnecessary procedures he has been forced to undergo over his seven month confinement in Sal’s room. The interns watch as Simon begins his surgical test, but the pressure causes him to recall a traumatic experience from childhood, in which his parents played a practical joke on him during a mock “surgery” on a piñata. Overwhelmed by the pressure, Simon runs out of the room and retreats to a nearby cemetery to contemplate his future. Offering to help restore his confidence, Stephanie brings him back to the now-empty surgical theater, where they make love on the operating table. Dr. Ludwig announces that Stephanie’s test results came back “negative,” lying about having tested her for the specific disease. Meanwhile, Angelo’s wife becomes concerned by the increasing amount of time he is spending at the hospital with the compassionate Dr. Walter Rist, who is unaware that “Angela” is actually a man. Near Christmas, Walter invites “Angela” to a holiday party at Dr. Prang’s house, where Stephanie announces she is willing to give up her dream of returning to Vermont in order to get married and live with Simon in Beverly Hills. However, Stephanie collapses, and Dr. Ludwig reveals that she has the condition Simon suspected, which is only curable through dangerous surgery. Dr. Prang is the lone surgeon to ever successfully perform the procedure, but he refuses to do it again until Simon persuades him by punching him in the face. Having secretly made a copy of Nurse Sprockett’s medicine cabinet key, Phil now steals prescriptions at his leisure, but she eventually discovers his deception when he and “Vanilla” are arrested by undercover police officers. Dr. Prang practices the surgery on a mannequin in order to prepare for Stephanie’s operation, but just before the procedure, the hospital nurses go on strike over a wages dispute, and Dr. Prang learns that his recent divorce proceedings have left him bankrupt. Ignoring his summons to the operating room, Dr. Prang chases his accountant at gunpoint throughout the halls of the hospital, forcing Simon to assume responsibility for Stephanie’s life. Although he has the assistance of Dr. Ludwig and some of the other interns, Simon believes Stephanie’s body has rejected the treatment, and he sulks out of the room. Once gone, the remaining doctors realize that the equipment was unplugged, and Stephanie revives. The interns wheel her on a gurney after Simon, and the two lovers kiss. After her recovery, Simon and Stephanie get married in the hospital hallway. When his father is ready to be discharged, Angelo writes Walter a letter stating that, despite the doctor’s attraction to “Angela,” they cannot be together because he is already married. Walter then begins a relationship with Nurse Sprockett. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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