Android (1984)

PG | 80 mins | Science fiction | 10 February 1984

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HISTORY

       Onscreen credits include the statement, “Android is based on an original idea by Will Reigle.” A 14 May 1983 Screen International article reported that writer James Reigle wrote a treatment after his five-year-old child, Will, suggested he create a story set in space.
       According to the 23 Feb 1984 WSJ review, Roger Corman’s New World Pictures agreed to provide half of the film’s $1 million budget if the producers raised the other $500,000. When the film was completed, however, Corman balked at releasing it due to its lack of action or gore. The filmmakers raised an additional $800,000 to acquire full ownership. An 18 Aug 1982 Var news item noted that producer Mary Ann Fisher and director Aaron Lipstadt previously served as personal assistants to Corman, and executive producer Rupert Harvey worked at New World in business affairs.
       A 24 Jul 1982 HR brief announced that principal photography had begun and a 7 Oct 1982 HR item stated Android completed production. A Screen International article reported that principal photography lasted twenty days, with one day of location work. The 27 Apr 1984 LAHExam review noted the motion picture used sets left over from earlier New World productions, such as Galaxy of Terror (1981, see entry) and Forbidden World (1982, see entry).
       On 14 Dec 1983, Var announced the film was picked up for domestic release by distributors Island Alive and New Cinema.
       The 10 Feb 1984 NYT review called Android, “an essentially cheerful, knowing little science-fiction film that positively celebrates ... More Less

       Onscreen credits include the statement, “Android is based on an original idea by Will Reigle.” A 14 May 1983 Screen International article reported that writer James Reigle wrote a treatment after his five-year-old child, Will, suggested he create a story set in space.
       According to the 23 Feb 1984 WSJ review, Roger Corman’s New World Pictures agreed to provide half of the film’s $1 million budget if the producers raised the other $500,000. When the film was completed, however, Corman balked at releasing it due to its lack of action or gore. The filmmakers raised an additional $800,000 to acquire full ownership. An 18 Aug 1982 Var news item noted that producer Mary Ann Fisher and director Aaron Lipstadt previously served as personal assistants to Corman, and executive producer Rupert Harvey worked at New World in business affairs.
       A 24 Jul 1982 HR brief announced that principal photography had begun and a 7 Oct 1982 HR item stated Android completed production. A Screen International article reported that principal photography lasted twenty days, with one day of location work. The 27 Apr 1984 LAHExam review noted the motion picture used sets left over from earlier New World productions, such as Galaxy of Terror (1981, see entry) and Forbidden World (1982, see entry).
       On 14 Dec 1983, Var announced the film was picked up for domestic release by distributors Island Alive and New Cinema.
       The 10 Feb 1984 NYT review called Android, “an essentially cheerful, knowing little science-fiction film that positively celebrates the shoestring on which it was made.”
      End credits include the following acknowledgement: “Special thanks to the unnamed individuals who contributed to the fabrication and operation of Max 404, without whom this film would not have been possible.” Cast credits include “Max” as “Himself,” but the role is performed by writer Don Opper.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jul 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1983
p. 12.
LA Weekly
1 Jun 1984
p. 37.
LAHExam
27 Apr 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Apr 1984
p. 5.
New York Times
10 Feb 1984
p. 28.
Screen International
2 Apr 1983.
---
Screen International
14 May 1983.
---
Variety
18 Aug 1982.
---
Variety
13 Oct 1982
p. 14.
Variety
14 Dec 1983.
---
Village Voice
21 Feb 1984.
---
WSJ
23 Feb 1984.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Rupert Harvey and Barry Opper present
A SHO Films, LTD. presentation
in Association with Fred Schwartz
DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
In assoc with
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Wrt
Based on an original idea by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key grip
Gaffer
Cam asst
Still photog
Elec bestperson
Elec
Elec
Grip bestperson
2d cam asst
Addl photog
Cam asst
Projector op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Des consultant
Graphic des
Graphic artist
Graphic artist
Graphic artist
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Propmaker
Asst propmaster
Scenic artist
Set dresser
Set dresser
Leadman
Set const
Set const
Set const
Set const
Set const
Set const
Const elec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Addl synthesizer eff
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Voice trmt
Sd eng
Sd services
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Dir of photog, New World Effects
Tech dir, New World Effects
Prod mgr, New World Effects
Miniature des and const, New World Effects
Graphic anim, New World Effects
Anim, New World Effects
Anim, New World Effects
Spec eff Eng, New World Effects
Elicon programming, New World Effects
Model builder, New World Effects
Cam asst, New World Effects
Anim asst, New World Effects
Anim asst, New World Effects
Electronics eng, New World Effects
Eff ed, New World Effects
Eff coord, New World Effects
Titles and opt
Titles and opt
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Spec eff makeup des
Prosthetics fabrication
Prosthetics asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Scr supv
Casting
Post-prod supv
Prod accountant
Max 404 software
Max 404 maintenance
Pyrotechnics
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Vectrex Arcade System by
Custom Vectrex programming by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 February 1984
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 February 1984
Los Angeles opening: 27 April 1984
Production Date:
began July 1982 in Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
Android Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 October 1982
Copyright Number:
PA156849
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
80
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On Terraport Station ULC-53, in the year 2036, an android named Max views a video sex manual until he is interrupted by Dr. Daniel via intercom. Max claims that he is doing research about Earth in the twentieth century. Max overhears a conversation between Dr. Daniel and the station’s owner, Terracorp, ordering the doctor to cease further research on their female android project, Cassandra I. Just then, Max receives a distress signal from the spaceship Neptune requesting permission to dock and make repairs. Meanwhile, all five Neptune crew members are killed in a shootout with three escaped prisoners, Margaret “Maggie” Kalliti, Orlando Mendes, and Gunther Keller. When the ship docks, Max assumes the three prisoners are the crew of the Neptune. Max informs them that he and Dr. Daniel are the only ones aboard the space station, and asks that they surrender their weapons. In the guest quarters, Mendes insists that he and Maggie share a room, and while Max shows Keller to his lodgings, the escaped convict notes Max’s physical awkwardness. Later, Max uses male and female anatomical models to fantasize about Maggie. In the morning, Keller plays solitaire and teases Maggie about her intimate encounter with Mendes. In the space station’s greenhouse, Max informs Dr. Daniel about their guests and the doctor is livid, reminding Max that he is not to make decisions on his own. Meanwhile, Mendes is eager to fix the Neptune and flee before the authorities realize it ... +


On Terraport Station ULC-53, in the year 2036, an android named Max views a video sex manual until he is interrupted by Dr. Daniel via intercom. Max claims that he is doing research about Earth in the twentieth century. Max overhears a conversation between Dr. Daniel and the station’s owner, Terracorp, ordering the doctor to cease further research on their female android project, Cassandra I. Just then, Max receives a distress signal from the spaceship Neptune requesting permission to dock and make repairs. Meanwhile, all five Neptune crew members are killed in a shootout with three escaped prisoners, Margaret “Maggie” Kalliti, Orlando Mendes, and Gunther Keller. When the ship docks, Max assumes the three prisoners are the crew of the Neptune. Max informs them that he and Dr. Daniel are the only ones aboard the space station, and asks that they surrender their weapons. In the guest quarters, Mendes insists that he and Maggie share a room, and while Max shows Keller to his lodgings, the escaped convict notes Max’s physical awkwardness. Later, Max uses male and female anatomical models to fantasize about Maggie. In the morning, Keller plays solitaire and teases Maggie about her intimate encounter with Mendes. In the space station’s greenhouse, Max informs Dr. Daniel about their guests and the doctor is livid, reminding Max that he is not to make decisions on his own. Meanwhile, Mendes is eager to fix the Neptune and flee before the authorities realize it is missing. However, Keller alerts him to the station’s Terracorp logo, informing him that the company is notorious for doing “off-planet” research and activities that are illegal on Earth. Arriving at the scene, Dr. Daniel instructs Keller and Mendes to leave the space station immediately. However, he changes his mind when he sees Maggie. The doctor orders Max to help the visitors with anything they need, then discreetly asks the android to arrange an assignation with Maggie in the greenhouse. Alone, Keller informs Mendes that Max is a robot and that Terracorp is responsible for the “Robots of Munich” uprising, in which androids at a factory killed the male workers and raped the females. In his lab, Dr. Daniel disobeys his orders from Terracorp and continues to work on Cassandra while observing Keller and Mendes on a video monitor and spying on Maggie as she emerges from a shower. Max invites Maggie to lunch with Dr. Daniel, but she is reluctant. Keller urges her to go so she can get information from the doctor. Later, Dr. Daniel works on the female android called Cassandra. Max overhears the doctor dictate into his audio log that Max is showing signs of the “Munich Syndrome,” and once Cassandra is operational, Max will be obsolete and must be terminated. As Mendes and Keller repair the Neptune, Maggie reports to the garden for lunch with Dr. Daniel. He proposes that Maggie allow him to connect her to the female android, Cassandra, and to stimulate her sexually to activate the robot. Maggie refuses and the doctor becomes upset. Max observes them from his video monitor, then watches the film Metropolis. Max receives a radio signal from the Terrapol police ship Minos informing him that Mendes, Keller, and Maggie are dangerous fugitives. However, Max claims no one fitting their descriptions is on board. He arms the space station’s defenses, but the police insist on investigating, anyway. When the Minos attempts to dock, Max blows up the police ship. Meanwhile, Mendes demands that they leave immediately, and when Keller insists the Neptune is not ready, Mendes attacks. The fugitives are surprised when Max reports that he blew up the Minos. He tells them that the police ship was alone, but warns that there is an emergency signal box on the Neptune that should be dismantled. Unaware of the incident, Dr. Daniel continues to work on Cassandra and Max watches the film It’s a Wonderful Life. Maggie visits Max in his room to ask why he blew up the police ship and Max replies that he wants to join the fugitives in their journey to Earth. He wants to visit Chicago, Illinois, and fears being replaced by Cassandra. Although Maggie did not previously believe Dr. Daniel about the female android, she now asks Max to show her the robot. Taking her to the lab, Max repeats his desire to go to Earth and Maggie agrees before seducing him. As Maggie and Max make love, Cassandra is activated by the sexual energy. Max subdues the other robot, but Maggie is horrified to realize that Max is also an android. When Maggie returns to her quarters, Mendes suspects she has been intimate with someone and attacks. Keller intercedes, but Mendes knocks him unconscious, then kills Maggie. As Max packs a suitcase with spare parts for his voyage, he discovers Maggie’s body. Meanwhile, Keller is killed in his attempt to attack Mendes. Dr. Daniel observes the violence from afar on his monitor and locks Mendes in his room. He then swaps out a part of Max’s system that governs morals and orders him to kill Mendes. The android tears through the doors of Mendes’ room and snaps the man’s neck. Meanwhile, a fleet of police space ships approach the station. In the lab, Dr. Daniel reactivates Cassandra, undresses her, and attempts to fondle her, but she stops him. Max returns and restrains Daniel. As he and Cassandra remove the doctor’s head, they reveal that he, too, is an android. Cassandra restores Max’s “moral governor” and says they must go to Earth and join others like them. When the police troopers board the space station, they assume that Max and Cassandra are Dr. Daniel and his assistant, and agree to return them to Earth. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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