Cannonball Run II (1984)

PG | 108 mins | Comedy, Adventure | 29 June 1984

Director:

Hal Needham

Producer:

Albert S. Ruddy

Cinematographer:

Nick McLean

Production Designer:

Tho. E. Azzari

Production Companies:

Golden Harvest , Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

       More than six months prior to the domestic release of a The Cannonball Run (1981, see entry), a 24 Nov 1980 DV news item reported that producer Albert S. Ruddy and executive producer Raymond Chow were preparing a sequel, with the working title, Another Ball.
       A 8 Dec 1982 Var brief announced Hugh Wilson would direct the The Cannonball Run sequel. Filmmaker Hal Needham was reportedly unable to agree upon salary with producers Golden Harvest and distributor Warner Bros. Inc. However, Needham ultimately co-wrote the screenplay and directed the film.
       HR production charts on 21 Jun 1983, announced that principal photography began 20 Jun 1983 in Tucson, AZ. A 17 Jul 1983 LAT article stated the production budget was $20 million.
       The 6 Jul 1984 LA Weekly review stated that star Burt Reynolds and Needham, whose collaborations included Smokey and the Bandit II (1980, see entry) and Stroker Ace (1983, see entry), had created a “whole new category of filmmaking: noodle-brained gas guzzlers stalled on the far side of drivel.”
       The film reunited actors Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Shirley MacLaine, and Frank Sinatra, from Ocean’s Eleven (1960, see entry), and marked the final feature film appearances of Martin and Sinatra.
       Cannonball Run II was preceded by Cannonball Run, and followed by Speed Zone (1989, see entry). Jamie Farr, as “Sheik,” was the only actor to appear in all three films.
      Onscreen credits list the character played by Tony Danza as “Terry,” but he introduces himself ... More Less

       More than six months prior to the domestic release of a The Cannonball Run (1981, see entry), a 24 Nov 1980 DV news item reported that producer Albert S. Ruddy and executive producer Raymond Chow were preparing a sequel, with the working title, Another Ball.
       A 8 Dec 1982 Var brief announced Hugh Wilson would direct the The Cannonball Run sequel. Filmmaker Hal Needham was reportedly unable to agree upon salary with producers Golden Harvest and distributor Warner Bros. Inc. However, Needham ultimately co-wrote the screenplay and directed the film.
       HR production charts on 21 Jun 1983, announced that principal photography began 20 Jun 1983 in Tucson, AZ. A 17 Jul 1983 LAT article stated the production budget was $20 million.
       The 6 Jul 1984 LA Weekly review stated that star Burt Reynolds and Needham, whose collaborations included Smokey and the Bandit II (1980, see entry) and Stroker Ace (1983, see entry), had created a “whole new category of filmmaking: noodle-brained gas guzzlers stalled on the far side of drivel.”
       The film reunited actors Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Shirley MacLaine, and Frank Sinatra, from Ocean’s Eleven (1960, see entry), and marked the final feature film appearances of Martin and Sinatra.
       Cannonball Run II was preceded by Cannonball Run, and followed by Speed Zone (1989, see entry). Jamie Farr, as “Sheik,” was the only actor to appear in all three films.
      Onscreen credits list the character played by Tony Danza as “Terry,” but he introduces himself as “Tony from Brooklyn” in the film. The surnames of former professional football player Fred Dryer and 1980 Miss USA and Miss Universe Shawn Weatherly were misspelled “Dreyer” and “Wetherly,” in end credits. End credits include the following statement: “The producers wish to thank Governor Bruce Babbitt, the State of Arizona, the Arizona Film Commission, and Old Tucson for their cooperation in the making of this film.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Sep 1984.
---
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1980.
---
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1984
p. 4, 53.
LA Weekly
6 Jul 1984.
---
LAHExam
30 Jun 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Jun 1984
p. 6.
Motion Picture Production Digest
18 Jul 1984.
---
New York Times
29 Jun 1984
p. 14.
Screen International
28 Jul 1984.
---
Variety
8 Dec 1982.
---
Variety
4 Jul 1984
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Golden Harvest & Warner Bros. Inc. present
An Albert S. Ruddy production
A Hal Needham film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam op
Asst cam op
Asst cam op
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Still photog
Cam op
2d asst cam
Dolly grip
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Cable man
Projectionist
Video asst systems
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Greensman
Lead person
Lead person
Labor foreman
Const foreman
Standby painter
Drapery foreman
Const painter
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
Men`s cost
MUSIC
Mus
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus coord
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Sd mixer
Boom op
Spec voice eff
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opt eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Asst to exec prods
Asst to Al Ruddy
Asst to Hal Needham
Prod coord
Prod secy
Admin asst
Admin asst
Admin asst
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Prod comptroller
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation dispatcher
Loc mgr
Addl casting
Craft services
Post prod supv
Aerial seq coord
By-Air Corp
Prod facilities and services by
Hollywood, California
Lamborghini supplied by
Warner representative
Underwater coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Pub coord
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt safety
Stunt coord
ANIMATION
Anim seq
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Brock Yates.
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Like A Cannonball," written by Milton Brown, Steve Dorff and Snuff Garrett, performed by Menudo
"Cannonball," written by R. Stevens, performed by Ray Stevens
"Stop In The Name Of Love,"performed by The Supremes, written by Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland, used by permission of Motown Record Corporation and Jobete Music Co., Inc.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Another Ball
Release Date:
29 June 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 29 June 1984
Production Date:
began 20 June 1983 in Tucson, AZ
Copyright Claimant:
Arcafin, B. V. & Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 September 1984
Copyright Number:
PA224581
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27223
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

An Arab king chastises his son, Sheik Abdul ben Falafel, for failing to win the previous year’s Cannonball Run, an American cross-country automobile race. The king orders his son to return to the U.S. and win this year’s event, even if it means staging it himself, so the sheik organizes the event. Starting in Redondo Beach, California, and ending in Darien, Connecticut, with a $1 million prize, the race draws an assortment of racing teams and vehicles: a pair of young women, Jill and Marcie, scramble to find another car when their Lamborghini breaks down; stuntman J. J. McClure and partner, Victor Prinzi, impersonate a U.S. Army general and his staff car driver; Mitsubishi engineer, Jackie, and his oversized driver, Arnold, race a customized sedan; cousins Mel and Terry borrow a limousine from their Uncle Cal, a used car salesman, who insists they also take his temperamental orangutan; and Fenderbaum and Blake, a couple of Las Vegas con men disguised as police officers, drive a red Corvette. Meanwhile, in New York City, Mafia chief Don Cannelloni orders four of his henchmen to straighten out the financial affairs of his son, Don Don Cannelloni, who is owed $30,000 by Fenderbaum and Blake. Outside Las Vegas, at Don Don’s brothel, the Pinto Ranch, mobster Hymie Kaplan gives Don Don twenty-four hours to repay a $9 million debt. When Cannelloni’s men learn about the Cannonball Run’s prize money, the gangsters decide to pursue the sheik, and rob him on the road. Don Don, however, insists they also kidnap the sheik and demand a ransom. Meanwhile, Betty and Veronica, two actresses on a lunch break from playing nuns in a stage version of ... +


An Arab king chastises his son, Sheik Abdul ben Falafel, for failing to win the previous year’s Cannonball Run, an American cross-country automobile race. The king orders his son to return to the U.S. and win this year’s event, even if it means staging it himself, so the sheik organizes the event. Starting in Redondo Beach, California, and ending in Darien, Connecticut, with a $1 million prize, the race draws an assortment of racing teams and vehicles: a pair of young women, Jill and Marcie, scramble to find another car when their Lamborghini breaks down; stuntman J. J. McClure and partner, Victor Prinzi, impersonate a U.S. Army general and his staff car driver; Mitsubishi engineer, Jackie, and his oversized driver, Arnold, race a customized sedan; cousins Mel and Terry borrow a limousine from their Uncle Cal, a used car salesman, who insists they also take his temperamental orangutan; and Fenderbaum and Blake, a couple of Las Vegas con men disguised as police officers, drive a red Corvette. Meanwhile, in New York City, Mafia chief Don Cannelloni orders four of his henchmen to straighten out the financial affairs of his son, Don Don Cannelloni, who is owed $30,000 by Fenderbaum and Blake. Outside Las Vegas, at Don Don’s brothel, the Pinto Ranch, mobster Hymie Kaplan gives Don Don twenty-four hours to repay a $9 million debt. When Cannelloni’s men learn about the Cannonball Run’s prize money, the gangsters decide to pursue the sheik, and rob him on the road. Don Don, however, insists they also kidnap the sheik and demand a ransom. Meanwhile, Betty and Veronica, two actresses on a lunch break from playing nuns in a stage version of the The Sound of Music, overhear J. J. and Victor making plans to spend the $1 million prize. The next day, dressed in their habits, the women ask for a ride to New York. The race begins and the competitors use various means to elude law enforcement as they reach the open road. Cannelloni’s men make several attempts to kidnap the sheik, but fail. Meanwhile, Jill and Marcie burn through several cars before teaming with a tow-truck driver named Mack to continue the race. The Mitsubishi team, Jackie and Arnold, protect a family from a gang of bikers at a roadside produce stand. Later, Arnold deploys an afterburner to elude police, but loses control and crashes the car into a lake. However, the vehicle converts to a submarine before returning to land and re-entering the race. Over the course of the race, Betty, Veronica, J. J. and Victor become friendlier, and the women finally reveal they are not actually nuns. Elsewhere, Cannelloni’s men plant a stripper on the side of the road to distract the sheik. As he offers to help the woman, the gangsters grab him. When the other racers realize the gangsters have kidnapped the sheik and the prize money is gone, they call on entertainer Frank Sinatra for help. The “Chairman of the Board” telephones Don Don and recommends he audition a new singing trio as a lounge act for Pinto Ranch. Dressed as belly dancers, with Blake posing as their agent, Fenderbaum, J. J., and Victor perform for Don Don, dancing and lip-syncing to a song by the Supremes. Don Don is so intimidated by Frank’s endorsement that he hires the “girls.” Hymie and his henchmen arrive at the ranch to collect the $9 million Don Don owes. Don Don hands over the $1 million from the sheik and claims the rest is in escrow at a downtown Las Vegas bank. Outside, the “girls” attack Hymie and his men and steal back the $1 million. After shedding their disguises, J. J., Victor, Fenderbaum, and Blake are surrounded by armed gangsters in the Pinto Ranch courtyard. However, the other racers converge on the ranch and, led by Victor’s alter-ego, Captain Chaos, defeat the hoodlums. The sheik emerges unscathed and reveals that he has purchased the Pinto Ranch, and Don Don is his new partner. Hymie demands his money and the sheik gives Don Don $18 million to cover the debt, operating expenses, and “petty cash.” The sheik announces the race will resume and he doubles the prize to $2 million. The “Cannonballers,” joined by the gangsters and Frank Sinatra, return to racing. Later, the racers reach Darien and learn that there will be another Cannonball Run back to Redondo Beach, starting the following day. The king is angry with his son for losing again, but the sheik insists that he will win the next race because he hired today’s winner, the orangutan, as his co-driver. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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