Grandview, U.S.A. (1984)

R | 97 mins | Drama, Romance | 3 August 1984

Director:

Randal Kleiser

Writer:

Ken Hixon

Cinematographer:

Reynaldo Villalobos

Editor:

Robert Gordon

Production Designer:

Jan Scott

Production Company:

CBS Theatrical Films
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HISTORY

As mentioned in a 20 Jul 1984 HR article, the project was the inaugural feature film for Ocelot Productions, founded by producers William Warren Blaylock and Peter W. Rea. A 7 Jul 1983 DV article noted that the $7 to $8 million budget was entirely financed by CBS Theatrical Films, a division of the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) television network. Grandview, U.S.A. was one of four CBS Theatrical projects slated for production during 1983, in partnership with domestic distributor Warner Bros. Pictures. The 22 Feb 1983 HR stated that Lion’s Gate Films, formerly owned by filmmaker Robert Altman, was also associated with the production. Jonathan Taplin, Lion’s Gate’s new owner, is credited as one of the film’s executive producers.
       A 16 Aug 1983 HR article announced that singer-actress Cher had been cast in the lead role of “Michelle ‘Mike’ Cody.” However the following week, a 23 Aug 1983 HR item reported that she withdrew from the project over a difference of opinion with producers about the casting of the two male principals, and was replaced by actress Jamie Lee Curtis.
       Principal photography began on 6 Sep 1983, according to a 20 Sep 1983 HR production chart. After nearly seven weeks of filming, a 26 Oct 1983 Var article stated that shooting had “just completed.”
       Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filmmakers scouted CA and approximately forty towns across the Midwest, including ones actually named Grandview, before deciding to shoot in Pontiac, IL. Although CBS Theatrical wanted the production to film in CA, producers Blaylock ... More Less

As mentioned in a 20 Jul 1984 HR article, the project was the inaugural feature film for Ocelot Productions, founded by producers William Warren Blaylock and Peter W. Rea. A 7 Jul 1983 DV article noted that the $7 to $8 million budget was entirely financed by CBS Theatrical Films, a division of the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) television network. Grandview, U.S.A. was one of four CBS Theatrical projects slated for production during 1983, in partnership with domestic distributor Warner Bros. Pictures. The 22 Feb 1983 HR stated that Lion’s Gate Films, formerly owned by filmmaker Robert Altman, was also associated with the production. Jonathan Taplin, Lion’s Gate’s new owner, is credited as one of the film’s executive producers.
       A 16 Aug 1983 HR article announced that singer-actress Cher had been cast in the lead role of “Michelle ‘Mike’ Cody.” However the following week, a 23 Aug 1983 HR item reported that she withdrew from the project over a difference of opinion with producers about the casting of the two male principals, and was replaced by actress Jamie Lee Curtis.
       Principal photography began on 6 Sep 1983, according to a 20 Sep 1983 HR production chart. After nearly seven weeks of filming, a 26 Oct 1983 Var article stated that shooting had “just completed.”
       Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filmmakers scouted CA and approximately forty towns across the Midwest, including ones actually named Grandview, before deciding to shoot in Pontiac, IL. Although CBS Theatrical wanted the production to film in CA, producers Blaylock and Rea convinced the company that Pontiac was the ideal choice, based on size, the fact that the courthouse was situated in the town square, and cooperation from the local film commission. As stated in the 20 Jul 1984 HR, the filmmakers were allowed to repaint Pontiac city hall a more neutral color and were given the use of a baseball field to build the demolition derby set. The construction, costing $300,000, required that production designer Jan Scott transform the basic field into an entire facility, complete with bleachers, concession stand, lighting, billboards, announcer’s booth, and restrooms. The remaining locations in Pontiac involved little or no change.
       The Oct 1984 Box review reported that opening weekend earnings on 1,069 screens were $2.2 million, while the second weekend slipped to $1.2 million.
       In onscreen credits, the last name of swing gang crew member, Jim Moncher, is incorrectly spelled as “Moucher.”
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks to the people of Pontiac, Illinois and The Illinois Film Commission; Lion’s Gate Films.” Also noted: “The Eagle design logo is a registered service mark of Pitney Bowes Inc., Stamford, Connecticut; The MTV: Music Television logo is a trademark owned by and used with the permission of Warner Amex Satellite Entertainment Company.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Oct 1984.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jul 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 1983
p. 1, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 1983
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1984
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 1984
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
3 Aug 1984
Section F, p. 1, 10.
New York Times
3 Aug 1984
p. 8.
Variety
26 Oct 1983.
---
Variety
8 Aug 1984
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Blaylock/Rea production
In association with Jonathan Taplin
A Randal Kleiser film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit cam
2d unit cam
Still photog
Key grip
2d grip
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Assoc film ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Orig score by
Supv mus ed
Orig score rec at
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Prod mixer
Boom man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles & opticals by
Spec opt eff by
New York
DANCE
Choreog
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to prods
Scr supv
Asst Mr. Kleiser
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Asst prod office coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Pub
Casting assoc
Loc casting
Chicago casting
Caterer, The Arrangement
Automobiles furnished by
STAND INS
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
“Take Me Home To Grandview, U.S.A.,” written and produced by Graham Russell, performed by Air Supply, courtesy of Arista Records
“School Is Out,” written by Anderson and Barge, performed by Jack Mack & the Heart Attack, produced by Bill Schnee
“No One Left At All,” written and produced by Hillary Carlip and Miriam Cutler, performed by Angel and the Reruns
+
SONGS
“Take Me Home To Grandview, U.S.A.,” written and produced by Graham Russell, performed by Air Supply, courtesy of Arista Records
“School Is Out,” written by Anderson and Barge, performed by Jack Mack & the Heart Attack, produced by Bill Schnee
“No One Left At All,” written and produced by Hillary Carlip and Miriam Cutler, performed by Angel and the Reruns
“Get Up And Dance,” written, performed and produced by Larry Michaels
“Steely Man,” written by Frank Musker and Trevor Lawrence, performed by Frank Musker, produced by Bill Schnee
“Would It Be All Right To Come Back Home,” written and performed by Rosalie Winkler Karalekas
“Maybe We Won't Have To Say Goodbye,” written by Rosalie Winkler Karalekas, performed by Jerry Whitman
“Let's Talk It Over In The Morning,” written by Oscar Sullivan, performed and produced by Sammy Vaughn
“Nightpulse,” written by Patrick Bolen, Gabriel Katona and Bill Butler
performed by Roger Love, produced by Kim Espy and Tim Goodwin
“Der Kommissar,” written by Roger Ponger and Falco
“This Time,” written by Staff Fieldhouse and Scott Plunkett, performed by Delta, produced by Michael McDonald
“Face The Odds,” written, performed and produced by Gerard McMahon
“Running Wild, Running Free,” written by Steve Rice, performed by Eddie and the Tide, produced by Bobby Corona and Richie Corsello
“No Rest For The Wicked,” written, performed and produced by Mark Goldenberg
“In Need Of Love,” written by Julian Hernandez, performed by Herns and Ray, produced by Julian Hernandez and Bob Allecca
“I Want To Do It With You,” written by Layng Martine, Jr., performed by The Pointer Sisters, produced by Richard Perry, courtesy of Planet Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Grandview
Release Date:
3 August 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 3 August 1984
New York opening: week of 3 August 1984
Production Date:
6 September--late October 1983
Copyright Claimant:
CBS, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 September 1984
Copyright Number:
PA224580
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27390
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the small, mid-western town of Grandview, high school senior Tim Pearson borrows his father’s Cadillac to take Bonnie Clark to the prom. During the evening, Tim and Bonnie leave the dance to park in a secluded area, next to a stream. As the couple makes out in the back seat, the Cadillac begins to sink into the boggy ground. With his tuxedo splattered in mud, Tim walks to Cody’s Speedrome demolition derby and enlists the help of owner Michelle “Mike” Cody, who has a tow truck. In the meantime, Bonnie telephones her father, who meets the couple at the derby and punches Tim in the stomach for trying to seduce his daughter. Michelle Cody defends the young man, until she finds out Tim is the son of devious realtor and county commissioner Roger Pearson, who has attempted to acquire the derby property ever since Michelle’s father died. She asks her good friend, Ernie “Slam” Webster, a popular derby competitor, to tow the Cadillac instead. While her mother, Betty Welles, counts the small proceeds from that evening, Michelle worries about her struggling business, exacerbated by recent county inspection violations. After their encounter, Tim is captivated by the beautiful Michelle, and fantasizes about starring in a music video with her. Returning to the Speedrome, he meets Michelle’s mentally handicapped brother, “Cowboy,” who drives the forklift. Tim wants to compete in the derby, but Michelle dismisses the overeager teenager. After the bank refuses her loan request, Michelle asks her uncle, bar owner Bob Cody, for $10,000, but he is only able to give her $500. While at the bar, ... +


In the small, mid-western town of Grandview, high school senior Tim Pearson borrows his father’s Cadillac to take Bonnie Clark to the prom. During the evening, Tim and Bonnie leave the dance to park in a secluded area, next to a stream. As the couple makes out in the back seat, the Cadillac begins to sink into the boggy ground. With his tuxedo splattered in mud, Tim walks to Cody’s Speedrome demolition derby and enlists the help of owner Michelle “Mike” Cody, who has a tow truck. In the meantime, Bonnie telephones her father, who meets the couple at the derby and punches Tim in the stomach for trying to seduce his daughter. Michelle Cody defends the young man, until she finds out Tim is the son of devious realtor and county commissioner Roger Pearson, who has attempted to acquire the derby property ever since Michelle’s father died. She asks her good friend, Ernie “Slam” Webster, a popular derby competitor, to tow the Cadillac instead. While her mother, Betty Welles, counts the small proceeds from that evening, Michelle worries about her struggling business, exacerbated by recent county inspection violations. After their encounter, Tim is captivated by the beautiful Michelle, and fantasizes about starring in a music video with her. Returning to the Speedrome, he meets Michelle’s mentally handicapped brother, “Cowboy,” who drives the forklift. Tim wants to compete in the derby, but Michelle dismisses the overeager teenager. After the bank refuses her loan request, Michelle asks her uncle, bar owner Bob Cody, for $10,000, but he is only able to give her $500. While at the bar, Michelle encounters an intoxicated Slam, who suspects his flirtatious wife, Candy, is having an affair. As Michelle offers to help Slam home, he confesses to being infatuated with her during their high school years. However, Michelle appears reluctant to admit her own complex feelings for Slam. Suffering a hangover the next day, Slam leaves his job as a bulldozer operator to go home early, and is enraged to find Candy frolicking with salesman, Donny Vinton. After Slam vandalizes Donny’s car, Candy kicks her husband out of the house and files a restraining order against him. Slam takes refuge at the Speedrome, and Michelle tells her friend he does not love Candy, but is merely afraid of being alone. Later, Slam appears nervous as he invites Michelle to dinner. Although pleased, she must postpone on account of a county commissioners meeting that night and suggests they have drinks after the next derby. Tim joins his father at the meeting for an official photo and reveals that he wants to study oceanography in Florida rather than accept a scholarship from a local college. Mr. Pearson is opposed to the idea and tells Tim they will discuss the matter later. During her presentation to the county board, Michelle appeals for more time to comply with violations, but the members are reluctant. Desperate, she accuses Pearson of trying to force her out of business by buying all the property surrounding the Speedrome. Meanwhile, Tim goes to his father’s office to retrieve an item and finds plans to build a private country club on the derby property. He interrupts the meeting to show the board the blueprints, infuriating his father for jeopardizing a lucrative deal. After the meeting, Tim does not want to go home, and an appreciative Michelle invites him to her place. He is eager to leave the small town and is surprised to hear the twenty-seven-year-old Michelle moved back to Grandview after divorcing her husband. During the evening, the two have sex and Michelle offers to let Tim drive in tomorrow’s derby. Tim informs Michelle that immediately after graduation he plans to teach at a Scuba diving school in nearby Chicago, Illinois, so he can earn enough money to study dolphins in Florida. In the morning, Slam arrives at the trailer unexpectedly and storms out as soon as he sees Tim in Michelle’s bedroom. On the last day of high school, Tim announces he is leaving for Chicago to pursue his own interests. His father apologizes for his aggressive business tactics, and suggests Tim try the local college for a year before pursuing oceanography. However, Tim refuses. When a buyer arrives to pick up demolition cars at the Speedrome, Cowboy throws a tantrum and attacks the forklift operator, screaming that the cars belong to him. Michelle regrets not telling her brother about the sale. Before the derby starts that night, Michelle suspects the jealous Slam Webster will target Tim’s car and gives the teenager some last minute advice. Meanwhile, her attempt to reconcile with Slam fails. During the competition, Slam topples Tim’s car, not realizing that the boy’s vehicle was already out of commission. Although Slam is apologetic and Tim has only a minor injury, Michelle kicks Slam out of the race for unfair play. Exasperated, the hot-tempered Slam leaves the derby and plows through his house with a bulldozer while Candy Webster and Donny Vinton are inside. Police arrive to arrest Slam, while the two lovers scramble from the bedroom in their underwear. As Michelle takes Tim to the hospital for treatment, she admits she loves Slam. Back at the Speedrome, Michelle and Tim find the entire place engulfed in flames. When his father shows up at the site the next morning, Tim accuses him of starting the fire, but Mr. Pearson denies responsibility. The firemen discover the padlock to a gas valve was unlocked, and Michelle confronts her brother who is the only other person with a key. An emotional Cowboy admits to the wrongdoing, complaining that she took his cars away. Despite losing their home as well as their business, Michelle and her mother embrace the troubled boy. Tim apologizes to his father and rides home with him. When Michelle bails Slam out of jail, the two kiss and appear ready to embark on a relationship. Michelle mentions she might finally get a fair deal and sell the property to Pearson, allowing them to start a new life together. Later, Tim says goodbye to his family before boarding the bus for Chicago. As the bus leaves town, Slam and Michelle intercept it and pull Tim off. Handing him some cash and keys to an old Studebaker, the two instruct the high school graduate to skip Chicago and go directly to Florida to study dolphins. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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