Crooner (1932)

64 or 68-69 mins | Musical | 20 August 1932

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writer:

Charles Kenyon

Cinematographer:

Robert Kurrle

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to FD, Sheila Terry was substituted for Evalyn Knapp at the last minute and Frank McHugh had originally been signed for the picture but did not appear in the completed film. A later FD news item notes that William Halligan and Guy Kibbee replaced Harry Seymour and McHugh. Some contemporary sources erroneously list the editor as B. Bretherton. ...

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According to FD, Sheila Terry was substituted for Evalyn Knapp at the last minute and Frank McHugh had originally been signed for the picture but did not appear in the completed film. A later FD news item notes that William Halligan and Guy Kibbee replaced Harry Seymour and McHugh. Some contemporary sources erroneously list the editor as B. Bretherton.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
24 Apr 1932
p. 4
Film Daily
1 May 1932
p. 4
Film Daily
2 May 1932
p. 6
Film Daily
6 Aug 1932
p. 5
Motion Picture Herald
6 Aug 1932
p. 35
New York Times
20 Aug 1932
p. 7
Variety
23 Aug 1932
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Crooner by Rian James (New York, 1932).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Three's a Crowd," music and lyrics by Al Dubin, Irving Kahal and Harry Warren; "Goin' Back Home," "I Must Have 'Em Young," "Rice and Old Shoes," "Sock the Cymbal," "Sophisticated Rhythm," "We're Sure to Meet Some Day," "We've Got the Right Idea," "Why Did You Do It to Me?" "Why the Devil" and "You Grew Up for Me," music and lyrics by Don Hartman and John Hancock; "Sweethearts Forever," music and lyrics by Cliff Friend and Irving Caesar.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 August 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
24 August 1932
LP3212
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64 or 68-69
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Ted Taylor and his band find success after Ted, standing in for an ailing singer, croons through a megaphone, and the band is given a contract by a nightclub. Ted's girl, Judy Mason, brings press agent Peter Sturgis to hear the band. Despite the fact that he thinks Ted has no talent, Peter takes the account and boosts the band's price. Ted wants to marry Judy now that he is earning a good living, but Peter, who is in love with Judy himself, convinces Ted that marriage would not be good for his image. As the band enjoys more success, Ted becomes totally self-absorbed. He instructs the band to play slower so he can show off his voice, but now people cannot dance to the music. Soon he breaks his dates with Judy to take out society women. He pretends to have strained his voice so he can cruise with socialite Mrs. Brown. Judy is furious when she learns of his affair and lectures him severely. Upset by her accusations, Ted gets drunk before his performance. The audience is tired of his draggy rhythms and overblown publicity and heckles him. When Ted picks a fight with one of the hecklers, who turns out to be a crippled war veteran, he loses what remains of his popularity. Some time later, while playing at a small club, he hears an announcement of Judy's engagement to Peter. He telephones Judy, and after realizing that the two still love each other, Peter steps ...

More Less

Ted Taylor and his band find success after Ted, standing in for an ailing singer, croons through a megaphone, and the band is given a contract by a nightclub. Ted's girl, Judy Mason, brings press agent Peter Sturgis to hear the band. Despite the fact that he thinks Ted has no talent, Peter takes the account and boosts the band's price. Ted wants to marry Judy now that he is earning a good living, but Peter, who is in love with Judy himself, convinces Ted that marriage would not be good for his image. As the band enjoys more success, Ted becomes totally self-absorbed. He instructs the band to play slower so he can show off his voice, but now people cannot dance to the music. Soon he breaks his dates with Judy to take out society women. He pretends to have strained his voice so he can cruise with socialite Mrs. Brown. Judy is furious when she learns of his affair and lectures him severely. Upset by her accusations, Ted gets drunk before his performance. The audience is tired of his draggy rhythms and overblown publicity and heckles him. When Ted picks a fight with one of the hecklers, who turns out to be a crippled war veteran, he loses what remains of his popularity. Some time later, while playing at a small club, he hears an announcement of Judy's engagement to Peter. He telephones Judy, and after realizing that the two still love each other, Peter steps aside.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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