Ready, Willing and Able (1937)

83 or 93 mins | Comedy | 6 March 1937

Director:

Ray Enright

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Doug Gould

Production Designer:

Carl Jules Weyl

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Var notes that this was Lee Dixon's first starring role. This was Ross Alexander's final film. He committed suicide in l937. According to HR , Select Theatres filed suit against Warner Bros., alleging that the story "The Audition" which they copyrighted in 1925, had been plagerized in this film. The outcome of the suit has not been determined. Dance director Bobby Connolly received an Academy Award for his work on the "Too Marvelous for Words" ... More Less

Var notes that this was Lee Dixon's first starring role. This was Ross Alexander's final film. He committed suicide in l937. According to HR , Select Theatres filed suit against Warner Bros., alleging that the story "The Audition" which they copyrighted in 1925, had been plagerized in this film. The outcome of the suit has not been determined. Dance director Bobby Connolly received an Academy Award for his work on the "Too Marvelous for Words" number. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Jan 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Mar 37
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 36
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Jan 37
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
21 Nov 36
p. 36, 44
Motion Picture Herald
6 Feb 37
p. 47.
New York Times
15 Mar 37
p. 27.
Variety
17 Mar 37
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl dial
Addl dial
Contr to trmt
Contr to trmt
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Orch arr
DANCE
Mus numbers dir and staged by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the story "Ready, Willing and Able" by Richard Macaulay in The Saturday Evening Post (13 Sep 1935).
SONGS
"Too Marvelous for Words," "Just a Quiet Evening" and "Sentimental and Melancholy," music and lyrics by Johnny Mercer and Richard Whiting.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 March 1937
Production Date:
began late September 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 February 1937
Copyright Number:
LP6967
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83 or 93
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2751
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Barry Granville and Pinky Blair, two would-be theatrical producers, get financing for their new musical on the condition that they hire Jane Clarke, a popular British actress, to star in it. In New York City, J. Van Courtland, a theatrical agent, learns of the project and rushes to meet the ship he believes Jane is taking to America. He mistakes an American girl, also named Jane Clarke, for the English actress and signs her to a contract. Jane, a college student who hopes to become an actress, impersonates the British actress in order to perform on Broadway and also because she has fallen in love with Barry. Although her dancing is fine, she cannot sing, and eventually confesses the truth to Barry, not realizing that the show's financing depends on the presence of the English Jane. Meanwhile, the English Jane is threatening to sue the company backing the production, and the company tries to break the contract. Barry reminds them that he has a contract to produce the show and will hold them to it. The company wants to produce the show themselves, however, and sends for the star, offering her more money than before. Pinky, Jane, her friend Angie and Van meet the boat and prevent Edward McNeil, the head of the company, from signing her. Even so, the actress refuses to sign with Barry until Van recognizes her as an American girl who used to have a seal act in vaudeville. She agrees to appear for Barry in return for Van's silence. Van also forces Barry to put Jane to work in the chorus. Still ... +


Barry Granville and Pinky Blair, two would-be theatrical producers, get financing for their new musical on the condition that they hire Jane Clarke, a popular British actress, to star in it. In New York City, J. Van Courtland, a theatrical agent, learns of the project and rushes to meet the ship he believes Jane is taking to America. He mistakes an American girl, also named Jane Clarke, for the English actress and signs her to a contract. Jane, a college student who hopes to become an actress, impersonates the British actress in order to perform on Broadway and also because she has fallen in love with Barry. Although her dancing is fine, she cannot sing, and eventually confesses the truth to Barry, not realizing that the show's financing depends on the presence of the English Jane. Meanwhile, the English Jane is threatening to sue the company backing the production, and the company tries to break the contract. Barry reminds them that he has a contract to produce the show and will hold them to it. The company wants to produce the show themselves, however, and sends for the star, offering her more money than before. Pinky, Jane, her friend Angie and Van meet the boat and prevent Edward McNeil, the head of the company, from signing her. Even so, the actress refuses to sign with Barry until Van recognizes her as an American girl who used to have a seal act in vaudeville. She agrees to appear for Barry in return for Van's silence. Van also forces Barry to put Jane to work in the chorus. Still feeling badly for the trouble she caused Barry, Jane convinces Truman Hardy, her fiancé, to put up the money so the show can open. Barry, however, refuses to forgive Jane until Van tells him everything that she has done to help the show. Barry relents and tells Jane that he loves her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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