The King and the Chorus Girl (1937)

90 or 95 mins | Romantic comedy | 27 March 1937

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Cinematographer:

Tony Gaudio

Editor:

Thomas Richards

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The Var review notes that Fernand Gravet was "imported" by producer Mervyn LeRoy from Belgium. This film was LeRoy's debut as a Warner Bros. producer. It was released soon after the abdication of Edward VIII and contemporary sources note Gravet's physical resemblance to the Duke of Windsor. In a modern source, Groucho Marx writes "any similarity between our story and the love affair between the King of England and Mrs. Simpson was intentional." According to Var , the car that Gravet drives in the film belonged to the actress Constance Bennett and had been previously used by Mae West in a film. AMPAS files include a request from LeRoy's office to the Academy to add Arthur Sheekman's name to the screen credits as contributor to treatment and dialogue. The Academy agreed, but on the viewed print, Sheekman's name was not present. A Var news item gives the title of Krasna and Marx's original script as Grand Passion . This was Marx's first onscreen credit on a non-Marx Bros. ... More Less

The Var review notes that Fernand Gravet was "imported" by producer Mervyn LeRoy from Belgium. This film was LeRoy's debut as a Warner Bros. producer. It was released soon after the abdication of Edward VIII and contemporary sources note Gravet's physical resemblance to the Duke of Windsor. In a modern source, Groucho Marx writes "any similarity between our story and the love affair between the King of England and Mrs. Simpson was intentional." According to Var , the car that Gravet drives in the film belonged to the actress Constance Bennett and had been previously used by Mae West in a film. AMPAS files include a request from LeRoy's office to the Academy to add Arthur Sheekman's name to the screen credits as contributor to treatment and dialogue. The Academy agreed, but on the viewed print, Sheekman's name was not present. A Var news item gives the title of Krasna and Marx's original script as Grand Passion . This was Marx's first onscreen credit on a non-Marx Bros. feature. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
22 Feb 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Feb 37
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
24 Feb 37
pp. 10-11.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Jan 37
p. 54.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Mar 37
p. 44.
New York Times
29 Mar 37
p. 14.
Variety
16-Sep-36
---
Variety
31 Mar 37
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mervyn LeRoy Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Contr to trmt and dial
Contr to dial
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
DANCE
Prod numbers staged by
SOURCES
SONGS
"For You" and "On the Rue de la Paix," music and lyrics by Werner R. Heymann and Ted Koehler.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Grand Passion
Release Date:
27 March 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 February 1937
Copyright Number:
LP6975
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 95
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2873
SYNOPSIS

Former king Alfred VII drinks every night because he is so bored. His only two remaining subjects, Count Humbert and Duchess Anna, take him to the Folies Bergère, hoping the show will interest him. He is about to fall asleep in his seat when he notices one of the chorus girls, Dorothy Ellis, and asks Anna and Humbert to invite her to supper. Dorothy arrives at the hotel where Alfred lives only to discover that he has fallen asleep, so she immediately returns home. Anna is impressed by Dorothy's independence and is convinced that Alfred will be intrigued by a woman who does not chase him. She and Humbert visit Dorothy and beg her to resist Alfred in order to interest him in life. The ruse works and Alfred pursues her enthusiastically. He even stops drinking. Then, Dorothy falls in love with Alfred. Realizing that he will probably not marry a commoner, however, she pretends that she is leaving the show to get married. Alfred doesn't believe her and decides to abduct her to his yacht. To convince him that she is telling the truth, Dorothy arranges for Humbert to find Donald, an American waiter who is pretending to be her fiancé. Alfred starts drinking again and by chance walks into the restaurant where the waiter works. He learns that Donald was paid to impersonate a doctor and that Dorothy was paid to stop him from drinking. His feelings hurt, Alfred invites Dorothy to dinner on his yacht, planning to confront her. During the argument, Dorothy blurts out that she loves him before she runs away. Delighted by the ... +


Former king Alfred VII drinks every night because he is so bored. His only two remaining subjects, Count Humbert and Duchess Anna, take him to the Folies Bergère, hoping the show will interest him. He is about to fall asleep in his seat when he notices one of the chorus girls, Dorothy Ellis, and asks Anna and Humbert to invite her to supper. Dorothy arrives at the hotel where Alfred lives only to discover that he has fallen asleep, so she immediately returns home. Anna is impressed by Dorothy's independence and is convinced that Alfred will be intrigued by a woman who does not chase him. She and Humbert visit Dorothy and beg her to resist Alfred in order to interest him in life. The ruse works and Alfred pursues her enthusiastically. He even stops drinking. Then, Dorothy falls in love with Alfred. Realizing that he will probably not marry a commoner, however, she pretends that she is leaving the show to get married. Alfred doesn't believe her and decides to abduct her to his yacht. To convince him that she is telling the truth, Dorothy arranges for Humbert to find Donald, an American waiter who is pretending to be her fiancé. Alfred starts drinking again and by chance walks into the restaurant where the waiter works. He learns that Donald was paid to impersonate a doctor and that Dorothy was paid to stop him from drinking. His feelings hurt, Alfred invites Dorothy to dinner on his yacht, planning to confront her. During the argument, Dorothy blurts out that she loves him before she runs away. Delighted by the news, Alfred searches everywhere for her and finally finds her on board a ship headed for America. He charters the ship, and after he arranges for the captain to marry them, the ship sails to Niagara Falls for the honeymoon. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.