Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)

PG-13 | 103 mins | Comedy | 11 June 1986

Director:

John Hughes

Writer:

John Hughes

Cinematographer:

Tak Fujimoto

Editor:

Paul Hirsch

Production Designer:

John W. Corso

Production Company:

Paramount
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HISTORY

The picture begins with actor Matthew Broderick, in the role of “Ferris Bueller,” speaking directly to the audience. His commentary continues intermittently throughout the picture.
       A 13 Jun 1985 HR news item announced Broderick’s casting and noted that Ferris Bueller’s Day Off marked the first release in writer-director-producer John Hughes’s new “overall deal” at Paramount Pictures, in which the studio maintained rights to all of the filmmaker’s projects regardless of whether or not they went into production.
       Studio notes in AMPAS library files report that principal photography began on 9 Sep 1985 in Chicago, IL, and the suburbs of Highland Park, Glencoe, Winnetka, and Northbrook. Chicago locations included Sears Tower, Wrigley Field, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Character “Cameron Frye’s” mid-century Modern home was located at the historical Rose House and Pavilion, on 370 Beech Street in Highland Park. The original Ferrari 250 GT California that appeared in the film was one of only forty-eight of the cars still in existence at the time, as only 100 handmade models were built during the California’s 1957-1963 factory run. According to a 3 Jul 2013 Daily Mail article, Neil Glassmoyer at Modena Design & Development was given one month to fabricate three replicas of the Ferrari, including two functional “Hero” and “Stunt” vehicles and one fiberglass shell that was used for the scene in which the Ferrari is totaled. The German-American parade scene was shot on two Saturdays—the first day captured footage from the actual event and the second day recreated the parade to showcase Ferris’s performance. The sequence was filmed on three ... More Less

The picture begins with actor Matthew Broderick, in the role of “Ferris Bueller,” speaking directly to the audience. His commentary continues intermittently throughout the picture.
       A 13 Jun 1985 HR news item announced Broderick’s casting and noted that Ferris Bueller’s Day Off marked the first release in writer-director-producer John Hughes’s new “overall deal” at Paramount Pictures, in which the studio maintained rights to all of the filmmaker’s projects regardless of whether or not they went into production.
       Studio notes in AMPAS library files report that principal photography began on 9 Sep 1985 in Chicago, IL, and the suburbs of Highland Park, Glencoe, Winnetka, and Northbrook. Chicago locations included Sears Tower, Wrigley Field, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Character “Cameron Frye’s” mid-century Modern home was located at the historical Rose House and Pavilion, on 370 Beech Street in Highland Park. The original Ferrari 250 GT California that appeared in the film was one of only forty-eight of the cars still in existence at the time, as only 100 handmade models were built during the California’s 1957-1963 factory run. According to a 3 Jul 2013 Daily Mail article, Neil Glassmoyer at Modena Design & Development was given one month to fabricate three replicas of the Ferrari, including two functional “Hero” and “Stunt” vehicles and one fiberglass shell that was used for the scene in which the Ferrari is totaled. The German-American parade scene was shot on two Saturdays—the first day captured footage from the actual event and the second day recreated the parade to showcase Ferris’s performance. The sequence was filmed on three blocks of Dearborn Street in Chicago, with 10,000 locals as background actors. Fictional Shermer High School was shot in Northbrook at John Hughes’s alma mater, Glenbrook North High School. After filming in IL for a little over one month, the production moved to Los Angeles, CA, where shooting took place on location and on Paramount Pictures soundstages. Filming was completed on 22 Nov 1985.
       Despite mixed, generally unfavorable reviews that objected to the entitlement, egotism, and apathy of the teen protagonists, the film grossed approximately $1.2 million on 1,296 screens its opening day, as stated in a 13 Jun 1986 HR article. Upon its 11 Jun 1986 release, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off earned an average of $216 more per screen than Top Gun (1986, see entry), the year’s highest grossing film to date. HR noted that these numbers were impressive because the picture’s target teen audience was still in school when the film opened. Paramount anticipated another surge in ticket sales at the beginning of summer recess.
       A television series based on the film, titled Ferris Bueller, aired on NBC 23 Aug 1990--11 Aug 1991.
       End credits state: “The MTV animation was provided by MTV Networks, Inc. The MTV logo is a registered service mark of MTV Networks, Inc., a division of Viacom International Inc. and is used with permission,” and, “All Museum art objects filmed at the Art Institute of Chicago are copyright © Art Institute of Chicago, all rights reserved.” Also included are the following “Special Thanks": the State of Illinois Film Office; the City of Chicago; the Chicago Cubs and WGN Television; the Art Institute of Chicago; WLS Radio; General Von Steuben German-American Appreciation Day Parade; Glenbrook North High School; the citizens of Chicago, Northbrook, Highland Park, Glencoe & Winnetka Illinois.
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Mail
3 Jul 2013.
---
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1986
p. 3, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1986
p. 3, 87.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 1986
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jun 1986
p. 1, 6.
New York Times
11 Jun 1986
p. 24.
Variety
4 Jun 1986
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
A John Hughes film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
DGA trainee
1st asst dir, 2d unit, Chicago crew
2d asst dir, Chicago crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2nd asst photog
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2nd grip
Dolly grip
2d unit dir of photog, Chicago crew
Gaffer, Chicago crew
Key grip, Chicago crew
Asst cam, Chicago crew
Asst cam, Chicago crew
Still photog, Chicago crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting by
Asst ed, Chicago crew
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Asst prop master
Set des
Leadperson
Leadperson, Chicago crew
Asst prop master, Chicago crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
Men's costumer
Asst to the cost des
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Supv mus ed
Orch
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed, Soundelux
Supv sd ed, Soundelux
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Cableman
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Titles & opticals by
DANCE
Choreog
Asst Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Post-prod coord
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod accountant
Asst to Michael Chinich
Pub coord
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation captain
Asst accountant
Office asst
Computer cont
Tech consultant
Extras casting
Caterer
Craft service
Dogs supplied by
Dog trainer
Spyder California
Chicago casting, Chicago crew
Chicago casting, Chicago crew
Loc contact, Chicago crew
Office asst, Chicago crew
Loc asst, Chicago crew
Loc asst, Chicago crew
Loc asst, Chicago crew
Loc asst, Chicago crew
Loc asst, Chicago crew
Transportation capt, Chicago crew
Transportation co-captain, Chicago crew
Local stabilizer, Chicago crew
Extra casting, Chicago crew
STAND INS
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt coord
ANIMATION
Computer anim & displays
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Bad,” by Mick Jones & Don Letts, performed by Big Audio Dynamite, courtesy of CBS
“Beat City,” written and performed by Ben Watkins & Adam Peters, courtesy of Fireball Records
“Danke Shoen,” by Bert Kaempfert, Kurt Schwabach & Milt Gabler, perfomed by Wayne Newton, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
“Bad,” by Mick Jones & Don Letts, performed by Big Audio Dynamite, courtesy of CBS
“Beat City,” written and performed by Ben Watkins & Adam Peters, courtesy of Fireball Records
“Danke Shoen,” by Bert Kaempfert, Kurt Schwabach & Milt Gabler, perfomed by Wayne Newton, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
“The Edge Of Forever,” by Nick Laird-Clowes & Gilbert Gabriel, performed by The Dream Academy, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“I’m Afraid,” by David Joyner & Paul Mansfield, performed by Blue Room
“Jeannie (Theme From I Dream of Jeannie), by Hugo Montenegro, courtesy of TeeVee Toons, Inc.
“Love Missile F1-11,” by Tony James, Neil Whitmore & Martin Dogville, performed by Sigue Sigue Sputnick, courtesy of EMI Records Ltd./Manhattan Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
“March Of The Swivelheads,” written and performed by The (English) Beat, courtesy of Arista Records Ltd./I.R.S. Records
“Oh Yeah,” by Boris Blank & Dieter Meier, performed by Yello, courtesy of Elektra/Asylum Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products: and Phonogram GMBH
“Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want,” by Steven Morrissey & Johnny Marr, performed by The Dream Academy, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Radio People,” by Larry Troutman & Zapp Troutman, performed by Zapp, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Star Wars (Main Title),” by John Williams
“Taking The Day Off,” by David Wakeling, performed by General Public, courtesy of I.R.S. Records/Virgin Records Ltd.
“Twist And Shout,” by Bert Russell & Phil Medley, performed by The Beatles, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc./EMI Records Ltd.
“WLS Jingle,” courtesy of JAM Creative Productions.
+
PERFORMERS
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 June 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 June 1986
Production Date:
9 September--22 November 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
24 June 1986
Copyright Number:
PA293303
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
103
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28070
SYNOPSIS

One spring morning in Shermer, Illinois, teenager Ferris Bueller feigns illness to stay home from school. As Tom and Katie Bueller dote over their impish son, Ferris’s younger sister, Jeanie, is enraged by the ruse and vows revenge. With the family gone, Ferris sunbathes and telephones his best friend, Cameron Frye, who is perpetually sick and absent from school. Ferris plans to cure Cameron’s depression with a carefree adventure, but Cameron is averse to getting out of bed and drives to Ferris’s house only grudgingly. Elsewhere, Katie Bueller receives a telephone call at her office from Edward R. “Ed” Rooney, dean of students at Shermer High School. The principal complains about Ferris’s poor attendance and threatens to forestall the boy’s upcoming graduation, but Katie does not believe her son is a truant. When Principal Rooney looks at his computer record for evidence, he notices Ferris’s nine absent days dwindle down to one and realizes the boy is manipulating his student file from home. Enraged, Rooney fears the student body will imitate Ferris’s shenanigans. He pledges to find Ferris and shame him in front of his classmates, but students are already bustling with rumors and concern about Ferris’s presumed illness. Meanwhile, Ferris continues to plot his self-appointed day off by fraudulently excusing his girl friend, Sloane Peterson, from class. Ferris convinces Cameron to phone school in the guise of Sloane’s father and announce the unexpected death of her grandmother. Taking the call, Principal Rooney suspects he is speaking to Ferris, not “Mr. Peterson,” and demands to see the grandmother’s corpse before Sloane leaves campus. Just then, Ferris telephones ... +


One spring morning in Shermer, Illinois, teenager Ferris Bueller feigns illness to stay home from school. As Tom and Katie Bueller dote over their impish son, Ferris’s younger sister, Jeanie, is enraged by the ruse and vows revenge. With the family gone, Ferris sunbathes and telephones his best friend, Cameron Frye, who is perpetually sick and absent from school. Ferris plans to cure Cameron’s depression with a carefree adventure, but Cameron is averse to getting out of bed and drives to Ferris’s house only grudgingly. Elsewhere, Katie Bueller receives a telephone call at her office from Edward R. “Ed” Rooney, dean of students at Shermer High School. The principal complains about Ferris’s poor attendance and threatens to forestall the boy’s upcoming graduation, but Katie does not believe her son is a truant. When Principal Rooney looks at his computer record for evidence, he notices Ferris’s nine absent days dwindle down to one and realizes the boy is manipulating his student file from home. Enraged, Rooney fears the student body will imitate Ferris’s shenanigans. He pledges to find Ferris and shame him in front of his classmates, but students are already bustling with rumors and concern about Ferris’s presumed illness. Meanwhile, Ferris continues to plot his self-appointed day off by fraudulently excusing his girl friend, Sloane Peterson, from class. Ferris convinces Cameron to phone school in the guise of Sloane’s father and announce the unexpected death of her grandmother. Taking the call, Principal Rooney suspects he is speaking to Ferris, not “Mr. Peterson,” and demands to see the grandmother’s corpse before Sloane leaves campus. Just then, Ferris telephones Rooney’s office on another line and Rooney recoils, now believing he has actually insulted the real Mr. Peterson. Continuing to impersonate “Mr. Peterson,” Cameron gets carried away with the prank and orders Rooney to escort Sloane outside. Since Ferris must now masquerade as “Mr. Peterson” in person, he convinces Cameron to “borrow” his father’s prized possession, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California. Cameron is terrified of his volatile father and hides under the sports car’s retracted convertible roof as Ferris collects Sloane from school. As the three friends speed toward downtown Chicago, Illinois, Principal Rooney realizes he has been outwitted and sets upon an ill-fated mission for revenge. Ferris leaves the Ferrari with an unsavory parking attendant and coerces his way into a fancy restaurant, where he narrowly misses crossing paths with his father. The friends attend a Chicago Cubs baseball game at Wrigley Field, and Ferris catches a stray ball. After visiting the Art Institute of Chicago, the threesome come across the General Von Steuben German-American Appreciation Day Parade. Ferris energizes the crowd with lip-synched versions of the songs “Danke Schoen” and “Twist And Shout.” Back in Shermer, Principal Rooney hunts Ferris and breaks into the Bueller residence. Ferris’s sister, Jeanie, continues her own pursuit of Ferris and returns home to discover a strange man lurking in the kitchen. Unaware the intruder is Principal Rooney, Jeanie kicks him unconscious and telephones police. However, the operator believes Jeanie is giving a fraudulent report and the girl is detained at the police station for making a “phony” call. Jeanie seethes with anger as she waits for her mother, but she is seduced by a handsome drug addict with whom she shares a waiting room bench and the encounter makes her less embittered. Meanwhile, Principal Rooney awakens in the Bueller kitchen and staggers outside as his car is towed away. In Chicago, Ferris and his friends return to the parking garage and are relieved to find the Ferrari seemingly unharmed. On the way home, however, Ferris notices the odometer reading is over 150 miles in excess of when they began their adventure and Cameron becomes catatonic. Ferris drives to Sloane’s house, where they attempt to rouse Cameron by luring him into the jacuzzi, but the boy remains listless. As Cameron sits in a deck chair, perched at the edge of the diving board, he plunges head first into the pool. Ferris fears his friend has attempted suicide, and dives in the water to save him. When the boys resurface, Cameron is unresponsive and Ferris panics. However, Cameron revives with a smile, revealing that he staged the incident to quell Ferris’s sense of invincibility. The threesome drive back to Cameron’s house, immobilize the Ferrari with a jack, and run the car in reverse to restore its original mileage. While the vehicle churns in its glass-walled garage, Cameron describes the catatonic spell in which he observed life from afar. He declares that he is no longer depressed and credits Ferris’s antics as the inspiration for his spiritual awakening. He refers to Ferris’s “day off” as “the best day of my life.” Sloane points out that Cameron’s spirits may also have been lifted when he caught a glimpse of her naked body at the pool. When Cameron realizes the Ferrari’s mileage is not corrected, he refuses to be intimidated by his father and kicks the sports car in anger, inadvertently causing it to reverse through a glass wall. The Ferrari plummets into a ravine. Although Ferris offers to take the blame, Cameron relishes the opportunity to challenge his father and sends his friends home. Ferris escorts Sloane to her house and bids her farewell with a kiss, but rushes away when he realizes his parents will be home in five minutes. As Ferris darts across the street, he nearly collides with the Bueller family station wagon, driven by Jeanie, who is taking their mother home from the police station. Jeanie stares at Ferris through the windshield and speeds away in the hope she will get to the house first and finally expose Ferris’s high jinks. Although Ferris makes it back before his sister, he is intercepted by Principal Rooney, who threatens to punish him with another year of high school. Just then, Jeanie discovers Rooney’s wallet on the kitchen floor and realizes he was the intruder. Redirecting her rage at the principal, Jeanie appears at the back door and plays along with Ferris. As Ferris darts back to his bedroom, Jeanie hands Rooney his wallet with a stern warning and the principal skulks away. Ferris survives the pitfalls of his day off unscathed, and remains infallible in the eyes of his oblivious parents. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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