Stephen King's Cat's Eye (1985)

PG-13 | 94 mins | Horror | 12 April 1985

Director:

Lewis Teague

Writer:

Stephen King

Producer:

Martha Schumacher

Cinematographer:

Jack Cardiff

Editor:

Scott Conrad

Production Designer:

Giorgio Postiglione

Production Company:

Dino De Laurentiis Company
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HISTORY

       Musician Jacques Morali's name is spelled as "Jaques" in music credits. End music credits also list songwriter Bruce Vilanch as "B. Valanch."
       According to the 25 May 1978 HR, Sword & Sorcery Productions, owned by Milton Subotsky and Andrew Donally, optioned six stories from Stephen King’s short story collection, Night Shift. Three of the stories, Quitters Inc., The Ledge, and Sometimes They Come Back, would be combined into one film with the working title, Fright Night.
       The 15 Sep 1980 DV announced that producer Milton Subotsky, was in pre-production on Fright Night. However, the 1 Dec 1982 Var reported that the low-budget feature was still awaiting financing, and noted that Edward and Valerie Abraham had written the screenplay, although neither writer was credited onscreen.
       The 14 Jul 1984 Screen International reported that Milton Subotsky had sold film rights of Night Shift to producer Dino De Laurentiis for a six-figure total. The contract ensured that Subotsky would retain a co-producing credit and have input on script, casting, and editing of all the material sold and optioned to De Laurentiis.
       According to the 5 Apr 1985 LA Movie Gazette, the origins of Cat’s Eye began in 1983 when Dino De Laurentiis was filming Firestarter (1984, see entry), based on another Stephen King novel. De Laurentiis was reportedly so impressed with the performance of child actor, Drew Barrymore, that he asked King to write a new story with her in mind. De Laurentiis received fifteen pages the ... More Less

       Musician Jacques Morali's name is spelled as "Jaques" in music credits. End music credits also list songwriter Bruce Vilanch as "B. Valanch."
       According to the 25 May 1978 HR, Sword & Sorcery Productions, owned by Milton Subotsky and Andrew Donally, optioned six stories from Stephen King’s short story collection, Night Shift. Three of the stories, Quitters Inc., The Ledge, and Sometimes They Come Back, would be combined into one film with the working title, Fright Night.
       The 15 Sep 1980 DV announced that producer Milton Subotsky, was in pre-production on Fright Night. However, the 1 Dec 1982 Var reported that the low-budget feature was still awaiting financing, and noted that Edward and Valerie Abraham had written the screenplay, although neither writer was credited onscreen.
       The 14 Jul 1984 Screen International reported that Milton Subotsky had sold film rights of Night Shift to producer Dino De Laurentiis for a six-figure total. The contract ensured that Subotsky would retain a co-producing credit and have input on script, casting, and editing of all the material sold and optioned to De Laurentiis.
       According to the 5 Apr 1985 LA Movie Gazette, the origins of Cat’s Eye began in 1983 when Dino De Laurentiis was filming Firestarter (1984, see entry), based on another Stephen King novel. De Laurentiis was reportedly so impressed with the performance of child actor, Drew Barrymore, that he asked King to write a new story with her in mind. De Laurentiis received fifteen pages the following day. After De Laurentiis obtained film rights to Quitters Inc., and The Ledge, he asked King to incorporate the new story into the other two, creating the basis for Cat’s Eye.
       Principal photography began on 4 Jun 1984 in Wilmington, NC, according to the 7 Aug 1984 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that filming was completed nine-weeks later. Additional locations were reported in New Jersey, and at the North Carolina Film Corporation sound stages owned by De Laurentiis.
       According to production notes, the giant bed used as a set piece in Cat’s Eye, measuring in at over forty by twenty-feet, made the Guinness Book of World Records for “World’s Largest Bed.”
       The Jun 1985 Box announced a first weekend box-office take of $3.5 million from 1,460 theaters.
      End credits include the following acknowledgements: "Filmed on location and at North Carolina Film Corporation Film Studios, Wilmington, North Carolina. Our special thanks to the people of Wilmington and North Carolina; Mr. & Mrs. William Emerson, Best Products, Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Roth, Dorothy's Ruffled Originals, Graystone Guest House, Panasonic, Co-Operative Savings & Loan, Applause Toys, Downtown Merchants Assoc., Casa Bique Furniture, Marjorie Spangler Ltd., The Ocean One Mall, Atlantic City, New Jersey.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jun 1985.
---
Daily Variety
15 Sep 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1978
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1985
p. 3, 10.
L.A. Movie Gazette
5 Apr 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1985
p. 4.
New York Times
12 Apr 1985
p. 8.
Screen International
14 Jul 1984.
---
Variety
1 Dec 1982.
---
Variety
17 Apr 1985
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Dino De Laurentiis Presents
International Film Corporation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
UPM/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
1st asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Focus puller
2d asst cam
Cam apprentice
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Best boy/Generator
Best boy
Still photog
2d unit addl photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Grip
Lighting equip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Jr. draftsperson
Art dept p.a.
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Ed apprentice
Ed apprentice
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set buyer
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Prop master
Prop asst
Lead carpenter
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward mistress
Ward seamstress
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus consultant
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd cableman
Supv sd ed
Spec vocal eff
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Creatures created by
Foreground models
Spec visual eff
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Creature op
Creature op
Creature op
Model maker
Titles created by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup asst
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod exec
Casting
Casting
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Prod secy
Asst to Ms. Schumacher
Asst to Mr. Teague
Asst accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Unit pub
Driver capt
Script
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craftservice
Translator
Addl casting
Animal action
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Catering by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short stories "Quitter's Inc." and "The Ledge" by Stephen King in his Night Shift (Garden City, 1978), and the short story "The General" by Stephen King (publication date undetermined).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Every Breath You Take," composed by The Police, published by Illegal Songs, Inc. and Regatta Music, Ltd/BMI (opt.)
"Twist And Shout," composed by Phil Medley and Bert Russell, published by EMI Music Publishing, Ltd. and Unichappell Music, Inc./BMI (opt.)
"96 Tears," composed by R. Martinez, published by ABKCO Music, Inc., performed by The North Orchestra and used under license from Coombe Music International - London
+
SONGS
"Every Breath You Take," composed by The Police, published by Illegal Songs, Inc. and Regatta Music, Ltd/BMI (opt.)
"Twist And Shout," composed by Phil Medley and Bert Russell, published by EMI Music Publishing, Ltd. and Unichappell Music, Inc./BMI (opt.)
"96 Tears," composed by R. Martinez, published by ABKCO Music, Inc., performed by The North Orchestra and used under license from Coombe Music International - London
"Cat's Eye," J. Morali, F. Zarr, and B. Valanch, sung by Ray Stevens, produced by Jaques Morali and Henri Belolo
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Cat's Eye
Release Date:
12 April 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 12 April 1985
Production Date:
4 June--6 August 1984
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Camera and Anamorphic Lens by J-D-C Joe Dunton Cameras, Ltd.
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27688
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Wilmington, North Carolina, a stray cat is chased by a dog. When it hides inside a shipping truck, the cat becomes a stowaway as the truck travels to New York City. Upon getting out of the truck on the busy streets of Manhattan, the cat sees a mannequin in a store window, and psychically hears the voice of a little girl asking for its help, saying that something is after her. However, the cat is captured by an unknown man. Elsewhere in the city, a man named Jim drops off his friend, Dick Morrison, at “Quitters, Inc.,” a “stop smoking” clinic. Dick is taken aback by clinic owner Dr. Donatti’s radical methods. Donatti opens a curtain to reveal the stray cat behind a window, and placed in a room with a wire floor. Donatti electrifies the floor, shocking the cat, and threatens to do the same to Dick’s wife, Cindy, if he smokes another cigarette. After a second relapse, Donatti asserts that Dick's daughter, Felicia, will face the shocks, and after a third offense, he threatens to send men to rape Dick’s wife. He flashes a gun, implying the final punishment. Later that night, Dick sneaks a cigarette, but before he lights it, he hears noises in his closet, and believing someone is hidden inside, breaks the cigarette in half and returns to bed. The next morning, he sees footprints coming from the closet, and vows never to smoke again. When Dick visits Felicia at Saint Stephen’s School for the Exceptional, Donatti follows, and promises Dick that he will keep intensive scrutiny on him for a ... +


In Wilmington, North Carolina, a stray cat is chased by a dog. When it hides inside a shipping truck, the cat becomes a stowaway as the truck travels to New York City. Upon getting out of the truck on the busy streets of Manhattan, the cat sees a mannequin in a store window, and psychically hears the voice of a little girl asking for its help, saying that something is after her. However, the cat is captured by an unknown man. Elsewhere in the city, a man named Jim drops off his friend, Dick Morrison, at “Quitters, Inc.,” a “stop smoking” clinic. Dick is taken aback by clinic owner Dr. Donatti’s radical methods. Donatti opens a curtain to reveal the stray cat behind a window, and placed in a room with a wire floor. Donatti electrifies the floor, shocking the cat, and threatens to do the same to Dick’s wife, Cindy, if he smokes another cigarette. After a second relapse, Donatti asserts that Dick's daughter, Felicia, will face the shocks, and after a third offense, he threatens to send men to rape Dick’s wife. He flashes a gun, implying the final punishment. Later that night, Dick sneaks a cigarette, but before he lights it, he hears noises in his closet, and believing someone is hidden inside, breaks the cigarette in half and returns to bed. The next morning, he sees footprints coming from the closet, and vows never to smoke again. When Dick visits Felicia at Saint Stephen’s School for the Exceptional, Donatti follows, and promises Dick that he will keep intensive scrutiny on him for a month. Two weeks later, Dick attends a party where everyone is smoking, and although the temptation is overwhelming, he resists the urge to smoke. In time, Dick finds a pack of cigarettes in his automobile, and gives in to temptation. As he inhales, he sees a man watching him. Dick races home to find his wife, Cindy, missing, and receives a telephone call from Donatti, requesting Dick come to his office. True to his word, Donatti has Cindy locked in the cage. Dick tries to break the glass, but Donatti’s henchman holds him at gunpoint. In the struggle, the cat escapes and makes its way out of the building. Dick watches in horror as Cindy’s feet are electrocuted and she leaps around screaming. Afterward, Dick apologizes to his wife, and she forgives him. Meanwhile, the cat boards a freighter, and leaves the city. In time, Dick successfully quits smoking. He leaves Dr. Donatti’s office with a prescription for weight loss pills, and Donatti jokes that he will cut off Cindy’s pinky finger if Dick fails to take them. Later, Dick and Cindy have dinner with Jim and his wife, Sally Ann, and they toast Quitter’s, Inc. As Sally Ann raises her glass, Dick sees that part of her pinky finger is missing. In time, the cat arrives on the shores of Atlantic City, New Jersey, and hears another message from the little girl seeking its help. Outside a casino, the cat is nearly hit while crossing the street, and a high-roller named Cressner bets an employee that the cat will make it safely across the busy street. When it does, Cressner picks up the cat to take it home, but first gets assurance from his henchman that the hit he ordered on his wife and her lover will be carried out by a thug named Ducky. Elsewhere, John Norris puts Cressner’s wife, Marcia, on a bus headed for New York City, and promises to meet her there later. John Norris is attacked by Ducky, and taken to Cressner, who has another thug plant heroin in John’s automobile. Cressner threatens to alert police and have John arrested for drug possession if he does not reveal Marcia’s whereabouts. However, Cressner offers John a wager that could allow him to be with Marcia and receive a large sum of money. He challenges John to walk the length of the narrow ledge that surrounds his penthouse apartment. Reluctantly, John accepts. Cressner and Ducky try their best to make John fall, but after a harrowing ordeal, John succeeds. As the cat looks on, Cressner gives John a bag containing Marcia’s severed head, and tries to shoot John. However, John gets hold of the gun, and forces Cressner to walk the ledge himself. Cressner falls to his death. Meanwhile, the cat escapes again, and boards a train bound for Wilmington, North Carolina. The cat follows an unseen menace inside the home of a little girl named Amanda, who pleads with her mother to keep the cat. Her mother relents, but will not allow “General” to sleep in the house. Amanda continues to plead with her mother to allow the cat to sleep with her, and explains to her father, Hugh, that General keeps away her recurring nightmares about the monster living in her wall. While Amanda sleeps, the pint-sized monster emerges, and kills her pet bird, Polly. As the creature descends upon the sleeping girl, wielding a knife, General jumps through the open window to protect her. The monster stabs General, and retreats into the wall. The ruckus awakens the family, and Amanda shrieks when she finds Polly dead. She blames the monster, but her mother accuses General, noting the trail of blood on the windowsill. In the morning, Hugh notices the bloody wound on General’s shoulder, and tells his wife, but her dislike of the cat persists. After everyone leaves, Amanda’s mother lures the cat into a trap, and takes it to a shelter. Sometime later, a storm brews, and Amanda goes outside to search for General, who is set to be exterminated the following day. That night, as the monster reemerges, General escapes from the shelter and races through the rain to Amanda’s rescue. The small ghoul steals Amanda’s breath, but General arrives and fights the creature. Her parents hear Amanda’s screams, but the monster has blocked the door and they cannot get inside her bedroom. General chases the knife-wielding creature around the room, as Amanda cheers him on. When the monster jumps onto a record player, General speeds up the rotation, and the ghoul is flung into a fan and killed. Her parents finally break the door open, and Amanda’s mother is furious to see General. However, Amanda tells them about the monster, and they finally believe her when they see its mutilated body parts around the fan. Her mother makes Amanda promise not to tell anyone about the monster, and Amanda blackmails her mother into letting her keep General. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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