The Karate Kid Part II (1986)

PG | 113 mins | Drama | 20 June 1986

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HISTORY

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to Jerry Greenberg and Bob Greenberg from the Producer,” and “The title The Karate Kid has been used with the consent of DC Comics, Inc.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, work on the sequel began in Sep 1984 just a few months after the successful opening of the original film The Karate Kid (1984, see entry). Producer Jerry Weintraub hired screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen, who was familiar with Okinawa, and based the character of “Miyagi” on several of his own karate teachers. Kamen worked on the script for a year and was still making revisions up through rehearsals just a week before filming got underway.
       A 7 Nov 1985 Chicago Tribune article reported that although director John G. Avildsen had no background in martial arts, he relied on the experience of Kamen, who had a black belt in karate, and choreographer Pat E. Johnson to film the fight scenes. Production notes state that actor Yuji Okumoto, who played “Chozen,” had a brown belt in karate.
       The 1 Oct 1985 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 23 Sep 1985 with locations in Oahu, HI, and Los Angeles, CA. A 27 Sep 1985 DV article reported that the film had a budget somewhere “between $13 million and $14 million.”
       According to the Chicago Tribune, and production notes, the Okinawan village was shot in Hawaii, while the final fight at an ancient castle and a Naha street scene were filmed at The Burbank Studios in Oct 1985. Filming was completed in early ... More Less

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to Jerry Greenberg and Bob Greenberg from the Producer,” and “The title The Karate Kid has been used with the consent of DC Comics, Inc.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, work on the sequel began in Sep 1984 just a few months after the successful opening of the original film The Karate Kid (1984, see entry). Producer Jerry Weintraub hired screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen, who was familiar with Okinawa, and based the character of “Miyagi” on several of his own karate teachers. Kamen worked on the script for a year and was still making revisions up through rehearsals just a week before filming got underway.
       A 7 Nov 1985 Chicago Tribune article reported that although director John G. Avildsen had no background in martial arts, he relied on the experience of Kamen, who had a black belt in karate, and choreographer Pat E. Johnson to film the fight scenes. Production notes state that actor Yuji Okumoto, who played “Chozen,” had a brown belt in karate.
       The 1 Oct 1985 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 23 Sep 1985 with locations in Oahu, HI, and Los Angeles, CA. A 27 Sep 1985 DV article reported that the film had a budget somewhere “between $13 million and $14 million.”
       According to the Chicago Tribune, and production notes, the Okinawan village was shot in Hawaii, while the final fight at an ancient castle and a Naha street scene were filmed at The Burbank Studios in Oct 1985. Filming was completed in early Dec 1985.
       Production notes state that filmmakers were able to have access to a private property on the northeastern coast of Oahu in an area known as Kahaluu because actor Noriyuki “Pat” Morita knew State Senator Duke Kawasaki, who was a close friend of the retired doctor who owned the property. Over two months time, production designer William J. Cassidy and art director William P. Matthews built an Okinawan village consisting of seven houses made of wood and stucco and roofed with either tin, tile, or thatching, and embellished with “imitation coral rock.”
       A 7 Oct 1985 DV news item reported that the movie marked the theatrical film debut of actress Tamlyn Tomita.
       The film received an Academy Award for Music (Original Song) – “Glory Of Love,” music by Peter Cetera and David Foster, lyric by Peter Cetera and Diane Nini.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
7 Nov 1985.
---
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1985
p. 16.
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1986
p. 3, 9.
Los Angeles Times
20 Jun 1986
p. 1, 23.
New York Times
20 Jun 1986
p. 17.
Variety
18 Jun 1986
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
A Jerry Weintraub Production
A John G. Avildsen Film
From Columbia - Delphi II Productions
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Steadicam/Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Best boy
Best boy/Grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Illustrator
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Swing gang
Prop master
Set des
Sets constructed by
Const coord
Const foreman - Hawaii
Const foreman - LA
Const foreman - LA
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
MUSIC
Orchs by
Mus scoring mixer
Mus supv
SOUND
Boom man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Foley ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR asst
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec visual eff by
Spec visual eff by, Illusion Arts, Inc.
Spec visual eff by, Illusion Arts, Inc.
Time lapse visual eff
Time lapse visual eff, Energy Productions
Titles by
DANCE
Martial arts choreog
50's dance choreog
O Bon dance choreog
O Bon dance choreog
O Bon dance coord
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to John G. Avildsen
Asst to John G. Avildsen
Asst to John G. Avildsen
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Transportation coord
Transportation coord Hawaii
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Scr supv
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Tech advisor
Tech advisor
Extra casting - Los Angeles
Extra casting - Hawaii
Prod facilities provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Robert Mark Kamen.
SONGS
“Glory Of Love (Theme from The Karate Kid Part II ),” written by Peter Cetera, David Foster and Diane Nini, produced by Michael Omartian, performed by Peter Cetera, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“This Is The Time,” written, produced and performed by Dennis DeYoung, courtesy of A&M Records
“Fish For Life,” written and produced by Ian Stanley and Roland Orzabal, performed by Mancrab, courtesy of 10 Records Limited
+
SONGS
“Glory Of Love (Theme from The Karate Kid Part II ),” written by Peter Cetera, David Foster and Diane Nini, produced by Michael Omartian, performed by Peter Cetera, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“This Is The Time,” written, produced and performed by Dennis DeYoung, courtesy of A&M Records
“Fish For Life,” written and produced by Ian Stanley and Roland Orzabal, performed by Mancrab, courtesy of 10 Records Limited
“Let Me At ‘Em,” written by Richard Wolf and Wayne Perkins, produced by Richard Wolf, performed by Southside Johnny, courtesy of Mirage Records
“Rock And Roll Over You,” written by John Lodge, produced by Tony Visconti/Roar Enterprises Limited, performed by The Moody Blues, courtesy of PolyGram Records
“Rock Around The Clock,” written by Jimmy DeKnight and Max Friedman, arranged by Paul Shaffer, produced by Brooks Arthur, performed by Paul Rodgers, courtesy of Atlantic Records
“Earth Angel,” written by Curtis Williams and Dootsie Williams, produced by Freddie Perren, executive producer: AMI Productions, performed by New Edition, courtesy of MCA Records
“Two Looking At One,” written by Carly Simon, Bill Conti and Jacob Brackman, produced by Bill Conti, performed by Carly Simon, courtesy of Arista Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 June 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 20 June 1986
Production Date:
23 September--early December 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 June 1986
Copyright Number:
PA293353
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28174
SYNOPSIS

After Daniel LaRusso’s karate tournament win, his mentor, Mr. Miyagi, intervenes when Kreese, a rival sensei, belittles and attacks his pupil, Johnny, for losing the match to Daniel. Miyagi rescues the boy, then he gracefully steps aside at the last minute as Kreese jams both hands through a car window. Miyagi pulls Kreese down on his knees, and pretends to strike a blow. It is a bluff, and Miyagi tweaks the man’s nose instead. Six months later, when Daniel visits Miyagi, he announces that he has car trouble, girl friend woes, and his mother has to relocate to Fresno, California, for work. Miyagi demonstrates breathing exercises to calm Daniel. The next morning, Daniel is thrilled when Miyagi gets permission from the boy’s mother to have him as a houseguest for the summer. Soon, the postman brings a letter from Okinawa, Japan, informing Miyagi that his father is seriously ill. In line at the passport office, Daniel learns that Miyagi’s old girl friend, Yukie, sent the letter. Although Miyagi and Yukie were in love, she was obligated to enter into an arranged marriage with Miyagi’s best friend, Sato. Forty years ago, when Miyagi told villagers he would buck tradition and marry Yukie, Sato challenged him to a fight to restore his honor. Miyagi did not want to fight and left Okinawa. Daniel assumes that Sato dropped his grudge, but Miyagi remarks that honor has no time limit. As Miyagi is about to board the plane, Daniel shows up with a ticket paid for out of his college savings. Miyagi is touched that Daniel wants to support him during a difficult time and relents to having his company during ... +


After Daniel LaRusso’s karate tournament win, his mentor, Mr. Miyagi, intervenes when Kreese, a rival sensei, belittles and attacks his pupil, Johnny, for losing the match to Daniel. Miyagi rescues the boy, then he gracefully steps aside at the last minute as Kreese jams both hands through a car window. Miyagi pulls Kreese down on his knees, and pretends to strike a blow. It is a bluff, and Miyagi tweaks the man’s nose instead. Six months later, when Daniel visits Miyagi, he announces that he has car trouble, girl friend woes, and his mother has to relocate to Fresno, California, for work. Miyagi demonstrates breathing exercises to calm Daniel. The next morning, Daniel is thrilled when Miyagi gets permission from the boy’s mother to have him as a houseguest for the summer. Soon, the postman brings a letter from Okinawa, Japan, informing Miyagi that his father is seriously ill. In line at the passport office, Daniel learns that Miyagi’s old girl friend, Yukie, sent the letter. Although Miyagi and Yukie were in love, she was obligated to enter into an arranged marriage with Miyagi’s best friend, Sato. Forty years ago, when Miyagi told villagers he would buck tradition and marry Yukie, Sato challenged him to a fight to restore his honor. Miyagi did not want to fight and left Okinawa. Daniel assumes that Sato dropped his grudge, but Miyagi remarks that honor has no time limit. As Miyagi is about to board the plane, Daniel shows up with a ticket paid for out of his college savings. Miyagi is touched that Daniel wants to support him during a difficult time and relents to having his company during the trip. At the Okinawa airport, Miyagi and Daniel are met by Sato’s nephew, Chozen, and driven to a warehouse. There, Sato appears and informs Miyagi that they have old business to settle, but before they fight, Miyagi must take care of his father. After his rival leaves, Miyagi insists he does not intend to fight Sato. When Miyagi sees his father, Yukie sits beside his bed, and Miyagi is shocked to learn that she never married. In the morning, Daniel finds Miyagi warming up in the family dojo. The room is filled with four hundred years of family history, and karate rules are displayed in Japanese on long banners, hanging on the wall. As Daniel and Miyagi walk through the village, Miyagi says Sato had a big fishing boat and monopolized the local fishing economy. Many of the locals turned to farming vegetables to support themselves. Soon, Sato arrives and proposes that Miyagi fight him that night. When Miyagi says he will not be there, Sato removes his jacket to fight. However, Yukie appears and says Miyagi’s father wants to see both men. The elderly man takes their hands, joins them together, and dies. Out of respect for Miyagi’s father, Sato tells his rival he has three days to mourn. Afterward, Sato declares honor will be restored. Later, Miyagi and Daniel walk to a wharf. Miyagi dislodges a grappling hook from the side of a building and uses his karate technique to deflect it as it flies by. When Daniel tries to duplicate the move, he falls into the river. Meanwhile, Miyagi remarks that he and Yukie had their first date at this spot. Later, Daniel helps a villager wheel his carrot crop to Chozen’s weighing station. Daniel accidentally discovers the scale has been rigged, and makes an enemy. At night, when Miyagi asks Yukie why she never married, she tells him it is because he never returned. Miyagi confesses the biggest mistake he made when he left is that he did not take Yukie with him. The next day, Daniel plays with a Japanese toy pellet drum and tries to figure out why it is the secret to Miyagi’s karate technique. Yukie’s niece, Kumiko, joins him. The toy reminds her of a dance and she shows him the steps. Chozen makes fun of their dancing, jabs Daniel with the toy and warns him not to insult his honor or he will be killed. As Kumiko helps Daniel back to the house, they see Miyagi courting Yukie during a tea ceremony. The next day, Kumiko takes Daniel sightseeing. She shows him an ancient castle now owned by Sato. In town, Daniel peers through a window, and sees Chozen giving a karate lesson. Kumiko wants to be a ballet dancer, and a friend invites her and Daniel to a dance. They wander into a bar where bets are being taken to see how many sheets of ice can be broken at one time. Chozen appears and dares Daniel to take the challenge. He refuses but Miyagi arrives and bets $600 that Daniel can break six sheets of ice. As Daniel panics, Sato appears and says he will cover Chozen’s bet. Miyagi and Daniel do their breathing exercises together until Daniel summons his energy to break all six sheets. Miyagi collects their winnings and tells Sato he enjoys doing business with him. The following day, Chozen informs Miyagi that the three days of mourning are over, and he must fight. When Miyagi responds that he is a farmer not a fighter, Chozen and his associates destroy the family crops. Later, as Daniel and Kumiko enjoy the dance, Chozen punches Daniel and takes his winnings. When Daniel sees Chozen’s cohorts harassing Kumiko, he fights back. He and Kumiko escape and drive away in her car. As Daniel goes to bed, he hears Sato in the street demanding that Miyagi fight. When Miyagi does not appear, Chozen and his friends taunt Daniel and vandalize Miyagi’s father’s garden and dojo. Soon, Miyagi appears and fights Chozen and his cohorts. Later, he tells Daniel it is time to go home. In the morning, Miyagi explains to Yukie that it is not possible to stay. She understands his predicament and asks if he will take her to America. Soon, Sato sends a bulldozer to destroy the town. Miyagi can no longer ignore Sato’s rage and agrees to fight on condition that title to the land passes to the village forever, no matter who wins. At first, Sato says Miyagi asks for too much but Miyagi argues it is a small price for Sato to pay for his honor. The rival demands the fight take place at midnight and warns Miyagi not to try any tricks. Later, Miyagi gives Daniel his will. Daniel wants Miyagi to leave without fighting, but he claims he is fighting for the survival of the village. Daniel meets Kumiko at the wharf and she prepares a tea ceremony for him. He drinks the tea, they kiss and hear a storm warning. Villagers scramble into a communal storm shelter. When Miyagi and Daniel help some villagers caught in the rain, they see Sato’s house collapse. Chozen runs by and claims his uncle is dead. However, they rescue Sato, who is trapped underneath fallen timbers. Daniel also rescues a girl hanging precariously from a wooden pole. Sato orders Chozen to help Daniel but he refuses. From the shelter, Sato watches Daniel slip in the mud and comes to his rescue. As Sato carries the girl to safety, he tells Chozen he is now truly dead to his nephew. Chozen runs into the storm. The next morning, as the villagers clean up the damage, Sato presents the village deed to Miyagi, asks to be forgiven and promises to help clean up. Sato also agrees to Daniel’s request to host the O Bon dance at the castle to honor ancestral spirits. The dance is a great success and Kumiko performs solo. However, Chozen ambushes Kumiko as she dances and holds a knife to her throat. Sato tells his nephew his actions are dishonorable, but Chozen claims he cannot hear Sato because his uncle is dead to him. Chozen demands that Daniel fight with him. After he releases Kumiko, they take turns landing blows. As they stagger from the physical punishment, the villagers thump their toy drums in support. Daniel draws strength from the rhythm and delivers a series of grueling hits. Finally, he asks Chozen whether he wants to live or die. When he replies, “Die,” Daniel says he is wrong, and tweaks his nose. He and Kumiko hug as Miyagi smiles.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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