A Nightmare on Elm Street, Part 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985)

R | 85 mins | Horror | 1985

Director:

Jack Sholder

Writer:

David Chaskin

Producer:

Robert Shaye

Cinematographer:

Jacques Haitkin

Editor:

Bob Brady

Production Designer:

Clifford Searcy

Production Company:

Juno Pix
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HISTORY

       The film is sometimes referred to as Nightmare on Elm Street 2, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2, Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2 or A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2, although the full correct title is A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge.
       The end credits include the following statement: "Based on characters created by Wes Craven."
       Capitalizing on the success of A Nightmare on Elm Street, New Line Cinema Corp. greenlit a sequel. An item in the 20 Feb 1985 HR noted that New Line would pre-sell the film at the American Film Market (AFM) and preproduction would begin in April. An article in the 10 Dec 1984 HR reported that New Line president Robert Shaye was hopeful that writer-director Wes Craven would return for the sequel, but an article in the 5 Oct 1985 Screen International reported that Craven was not involved. According to an item in the 5 Nov 1985 HR, director Jack Sholder was brought on five weeks before filming started which, according to the 1 May 1985 Var, was scheduled for Jun 1985. In the 30 Oct 1985 Var, Sholder reported the film was budgeted at $3 million, however, articles in the 15 Aug 1989 HR and the 10 Aug 1992 Var reported the budget was $2.5 million. The 30 Oct 1985 Var noted that Smart Egg Pictures returned for the sequel and Heron Communications also joined as a partner.
       New Line Cinema opened ... More Less

       The film is sometimes referred to as Nightmare on Elm Street 2, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2, Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2 or A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2, although the full correct title is A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge.
       The end credits include the following statement: "Based on characters created by Wes Craven."
       Capitalizing on the success of A Nightmare on Elm Street, New Line Cinema Corp. greenlit a sequel. An item in the 20 Feb 1985 HR noted that New Line would pre-sell the film at the American Film Market (AFM) and preproduction would begin in April. An article in the 10 Dec 1984 HR reported that New Line president Robert Shaye was hopeful that writer-director Wes Craven would return for the sequel, but an article in the 5 Oct 1985 Screen International reported that Craven was not involved. According to an item in the 5 Nov 1985 HR, director Jack Sholder was brought on five weeks before filming started which, according to the 1 May 1985 Var, was scheduled for Jun 1985. In the 30 Oct 1985 Var, Sholder reported the film was budgeted at $3 million, however, articles in the 15 Aug 1989 HR and the 10 Aug 1992 Var reported the budget was $2.5 million. The 30 Oct 1985 Var noted that Smart Egg Pictures returned for the sequel and Heron Communications also joined as a partner.
       New Line Cinema opened A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge in limited release on the 1985 Halloween weekend. According to the 30 Oct 1985 Var, the film opened on 530 screens in New York, Detroit, MI, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Philadephia, PA, Texas and Oklahoma. The 8 Nov 1985 HR reported the film would open nationally in Jan 1985. The HR article added there was confusion over the opening weekend gross when a New Line staffer accidentally reported the week’s projected gross rather than the three day weekend results. The corrected gross was $3,220,348 on 522 screens. The 28 Feb 1986 HR noted the sequel’s gross of $23,060,033 surpassed the first film and was New Line’s best grossing film to date. Charts in the 15 Aug 1989 HR and the 10 Aug 1992 Var report the film’s gross was $30 million.
       Cardinal Films’ written agreement to subdistribute A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge expired on 31 Oct 1985. As reported in an article in the 6 Jan 1986 Var, the company, claiming there were subsequent oral agreements to continue the subdistribution deal, sued New Line Cinema to keep New Line from self-distributing the film in Cardinal Films’ territories.
       The success of the first two films lead to a continuation of the A Nightmare on Elm Street series, although, as noted in an article in the 10 Aug 1992 Var, Shaye felt that the second film made a mistake by having Freddy leave the dream world and that would be fixed in the third installment. For information on subsequent sequels and spin-offs, see entry for A Nightmare on Elm Street.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Jun 2004.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 1985
p. 3, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jan 1986
p. 1, 8.
New York Times
1 Nov 1985
p. 10.
Screen International
5 Oct 1985.
---
Variety
1 May 1985.
---
Variety
30 Oct 1985
p. 18.
Variety
30 Oct 1985.
---
Variety
6 Jan 1986.
---
Variety
10 Aug 1992.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Line Cinema, Heron Communications, Inc. & Smart Egg Pictures present
A Robert Shaye Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Line prod
Line prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam
Key grip
Best boy grip
Company grip
Company grip
Gaffer
Best boy elec
2d unit dir of photog
2d unit asst cam
2d unit asst cam
2d unit asst cam
2d unit loader
2d unit key grip
Still photog
Cam supplied by
Cam supplied by, Interface Marketing, Inc.
Cam systems by
Grip & elec equip supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Art utility
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst ed
Ed room asst
Ed room asst
Ed room asst
Negative matcher
SET DECORATORS
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Scenic coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Set carpenter
Lead painter
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst props
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
MUSIC
Score preparation and orch cond by
Mus coord
Mus rec
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd ed
Magnofex
Sd ed
Magnofex
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Magno Sound
Looping ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Transformation eff created by
Spec mechanical eff
Spec mechanical eff, A&A Special Effects, Inc.
Spec mechanical eff, A&A Special Effects, Inc.
Spec puppet eff created by
Opt by
Berkeley, CA
Spec visual eff des and dir by
Miniatures
Miniatures
Miniatures
Live action
Live action
Live action
MAKEUP
Freddy Krueger makeup and eff created by
Makeup
Hairstylist
Asst makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod supv
Accountant
Asst accountant
Prod coord
Prod assoc
Prod exec
Asst to prod
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Loc mgr
Extras casting
Extras casting, Star Casting
Extras casting, Star Casting
Asst to dir
Office prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Intern
Craft services
Animal trainer
Unit pub
Asst to Kevin Yagher
Asst to Kevin Yagher
Asst to Mark Shostrom
Asst to Mark Shostrom
Asst to Mark Shostrom
Asst to Mark Shostrom
Casting asst
Post prod coord
Completion guarantor
STAND INS
Stunts/Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
SOURCES
SONGS
"Terror in my Heart," written by Rick Shaffer, produced and performed by The Reds
"Touch Me (All Night Long)," written by P. Adams and D. Carmichael, performed by Wish, featuring Fonda Rae, produced by Greg Carmichael and Patrick Adams
"Whisper to a Scream," written by B. Orlando and Z. Chase, performed by Bobby O. and Claudja Barry, produced by Bobby Orlando
+
SONGS
"Terror in my Heart," written by Rick Shaffer, produced and performed by The Reds
"Touch Me (All Night Long)," written by P. Adams and D. Carmichael, performed by Wish, featuring Fonda Rae, produced by Greg Carmichael and Patrick Adams
"Whisper to a Scream," written by B. Orlando and Z. Chase, performed by Bobby O. and Claudja Barry, produced by Bobby Orlando
"On the Air Tonight," written by Peter Bardens, performed by Willy Finlayson, produced by Peter Bardens
"Moving in the Night," written by Torben Schmidt, performed by Skagerack, produced by Jan Eliason
"Did You Ever See a Dream Walking," written by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel, performed by Bing Crosby, provided courtesy of CBS Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge
Release Date:
1985
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 1 November 1985
Los Angeles opening: 17 January 1986
Production Date:
began June 1985
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Deluxe
Prints
Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
85
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Two girls and Jesse Walsh are aboard as their school bus speeds past their stop. Freddy Krueger’s finger-knives glove shifts the vehicle and it speeds into the desert. During a lightning storm, the earth falls away until the bus is perched precariously on a rock tower. As Freddy gets out of driver’s seat and attacks, Jesse wakes up screaming. The Walsh family has just moved into the house on Elm Street and Jesse tells his parents and sister that his room is too hot to sleep in. His father insists there is nothing wrong with the air conditioning that cannot be easily fixed. At school, Ron Grady hits a baseball that lands on Jesse’s head. When Jesse’s play takes Grady out, Grady yanks Jesse’s pants down and they fight. Coach Schneider makes them do pushups as punishment. The teens bond as they complain about Schneider and Grady insists the coach hangs out at gay bondage clubs. Grady also fills Jesse in on the background of his new home; former-resident Nancy Thompson was locked in the house by her mother and went crazy when she saw her boyfriend murdered across the street. Jesse has a hard time sleeping that night and goes downstairs for a drink. He sees someone outside and investigates. A light comes from the basement window and Jesse sees Freddy take the finger-knives glove out of their furnace. As he goes for help, Jesse runs into Freddy, who wants to take over Jesse’s body. As Freddy pulls back his scalp, Jesse screams himself awake. The next day, Mr. Walsh ... +


Two girls and Jesse Walsh are aboard as their school bus speeds past their stop. Freddy Krueger’s finger-knives glove shifts the vehicle and it speeds into the desert. During a lightning storm, the earth falls away until the bus is perched precariously on a rock tower. As Freddy gets out of driver’s seat and attacks, Jesse wakes up screaming. The Walsh family has just moved into the house on Elm Street and Jesse tells his parents and sister that his room is too hot to sleep in. His father insists there is nothing wrong with the air conditioning that cannot be easily fixed. At school, Ron Grady hits a baseball that lands on Jesse’s head. When Jesse’s play takes Grady out, Grady yanks Jesse’s pants down and they fight. Coach Schneider makes them do pushups as punishment. The teens bond as they complain about Schneider and Grady insists the coach hangs out at gay bondage clubs. Grady also fills Jesse in on the background of his new home; former-resident Nancy Thompson was locked in the house by her mother and went crazy when she saw her boyfriend murdered across the street. Jesse has a hard time sleeping that night and goes downstairs for a drink. He sees someone outside and investigates. A light comes from the basement window and Jesse sees Freddy take the finger-knives glove out of their furnace. As he goes for help, Jesse runs into Freddy, who wants to take over Jesse’s body. As Freddy pulls back his scalp, Jesse screams himself awake. The next day, Mr. Walsh insists Jesse unpack his room and Lisa Webber shows up to help. As they work, she discovers Nancy Thompson’s diary, which describes Freddy attacking Nancy in her dreams. That night, Jesse goes to the basement furnace and finds Freddy’s finger-knives glove. Freddy appears and wants Jesse to kill for him. The next evening, Mrs. Walsh puts the cover over her parakeets’ cage. She complains about the heat and, as Mr. Walsh studies the thermostat, the birdcage rattles. Jesse pulls off the cover and one bird drops dead. The other parakeet escapes, flies madly around room and explodes. Mr. Walsh thinks Jesse put a firecracker in the bird. That night Jesse struggles to sleep and again goes downstairs. Lightning shoots through the kitchen window and Jesse finds himself at a seedy nightclub where he runs into Schneider, dressed in black leather. Schneider takes Jesse to the school where he makes him run laps and then shower. As Schneider waits in his office, balls and equipment fly off the shelves at him. Jump ropes wrap around Schneider’s hands and drag him into the shower where he is strung up, stripped and then whipped by towels. Steam engulfs the room as Freddy appears, kills Schneider and then vanishes. Jesse is horrified to realize he is covered in Schneider’s blood and wearing Freddy’s glove. When the police bring Jesse home after finding him naked on the highway, Mr. Walsh wants to know what drugs he is taking. Jesse insists he is not on drugs and refuses to talk with his parents. Lisa tells Jesse not to blame himself. She thinks Jesse is psychic and that he dreamed about Schneider’s murder. Lisa has researched Freddy’s background and they go to an abandoned power plant where he killed twenty neighborhood children in the boiler room. Lisa thinks Jesse will make a psychic connection, but nothing happens. That night, Freddy’s voice wakes up Jesse’s sister but it is Jesse who stands over her, wearing Freddy’s glove. Lisa has a pool party, but Jessie quickly hides in the pool house and Lisa joins him. Jesse worries that he might be going crazy but she promises to help and they kiss. Lisa’s eyes are closed as they make out, so she does not see the long black tongue extend from Jesse’s mouth. He is horrified and quickly leaves. Grady is grounded and cannot attend the party, so Jesse sneaks into Grady’s bedroom and asks for help. Jesse admits he killed Schneider, but says it was actually someone else trying to get inside his body. Grady thinks Jesse is merely having nightmares but agrees to stay awake and keep Jesse from leaving the room. Jesse falls asleep but wakes up as knives grow out of his fingers and he starts to morph into Freddy. Grady tries to open the door but it is locked. Freddy bursts out of Jesse’s stomach and kills Grady. The image in the bedroom mirror is Freddy, but Jesse stands in the room, bloody and wearing the glove. Jesse throws the glove at the mirror and rushes back to Lisa’s house. He tells her that Freddy is inside him. Lisa reads from Nancy’s diary that it was their energy that brought Freddy into existence. Their screams were all that he needed. Lisa knows Jesse can fight Freddy but Jesse begs her to leave as Freddy takes over his body again. Doors lock, the pool heats up, everything goes crazy, and suddenly Jesse has disappeared and Freddy attacks Lisa. She gets a knife and, from inside Freddy, Jesse’s voice begs Lisa to kill him. She stabs Freddy but the knife has no effect. From inside Freddy, Jesse says he loves her. Freddy suddenly pushes Lisa aside, runs through French doors and vanishes into air. All the doors unlock and the pool returns to normal. As the teens relax, Freddy bursts from the concrete by the pool. Lisa’s father grabs his rifle and shoots but he misses. As he reloads, Lisa keeps him from shooting Freddy who quickly disappears through a wall of flames. Lisa drives to the deserted power plant to find Freddy. She knows Jesse is still alive inside. Freddy corners her and is about to strike when Jesse’s voice calls her name. She tells Jesse that she loves him. Freddy’s knives retract and he starts to weaken. Lisa grabs Freddy and kisses him, knowing Jesse is inside. Freddy pushes her away as flames engulf him and he collapses. Jesse emerges from beneath Freddy’s burnt skin and Lisa hugs him. The next day, Jesse joins Lisa and their friends on the school bus. Jesse thinks the bus is moving too fast but Lisa calms him as the bus stops and another kid gets on. As Jesse relaxes, Freddy’s hand bursts out of another teen’s chest and the bus speeds into the desert. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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