Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

PG | 119 mins | Science fiction, Adventure | 26 November 1986

Director:

Leonard Nimoy

Producer:

Harve Bennett

Cinematographer:

Don Peterman

Editor:

Peter E. Berger

Production Designer:

Jack T. Collis

Production Companies:

Paramount Pictures , Industrial Light & Magic
Full page view
HISTORY

The film’s opening includes brief voice-over narration by William Shatner, as “James Kirk” reads the following recording in his captain’s log: “Captain’s log, stardate 8390. We’re in the third month of our Vulcan exile, and it was Dr. McCoy with a fine sense of historical irony who decided on a name for our Klingon vessel. And like those mutineers of five hundred years ago, we too have a hard choice to make.”
       Just weeks after the successful opening of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984, see entry), the 24 Jul 1984 DV announced that Leonard Nimoy was in final negotiations with Paramount Pictures to reprise his dual role as director and star for Star Trek IV. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Nimoy and producer Harve Bennett immediately decided that the fourth film should be “lighter in tone” than its predecessors, and chose to incorporate the element of time travel based on the popularity of the 6 Apr 1967 television episode, “The City on the Edge of Forever,” from Star Trek’s (NBC, 8 Sep 1966—3 Jun 1969) first season. While in Europe shooting the television mini-series, The Sun Also Rises (NBC, 1984), Nimoy created a brief story outline, and eventually consulted with several professors at the University of California, Santa Cruz; Harvard University; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who advised the filmmaker on theories of the future of the planet. The Dec 1986 issue of AmCin stated that the environmental aspects of the plot were inspired by Edward O. Wilson’s published study, Biophilia (1984), which warned that the Earth’s current ... More Less

The film’s opening includes brief voice-over narration by William Shatner, as “James Kirk” reads the following recording in his captain’s log: “Captain’s log, stardate 8390. We’re in the third month of our Vulcan exile, and it was Dr. McCoy with a fine sense of historical irony who decided on a name for our Klingon vessel. And like those mutineers of five hundred years ago, we too have a hard choice to make.”
       Just weeks after the successful opening of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984, see entry), the 24 Jul 1984 DV announced that Leonard Nimoy was in final negotiations with Paramount Pictures to reprise his dual role as director and star for Star Trek IV. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Nimoy and producer Harve Bennett immediately decided that the fourth film should be “lighter in tone” than its predecessors, and chose to incorporate the element of time travel based on the popularity of the 6 Apr 1967 television episode, “The City on the Edge of Forever,” from Star Trek’s (NBC, 8 Sep 1966—3 Jun 1969) first season. While in Europe shooting the television mini-series, The Sun Also Rises (NBC, 1984), Nimoy created a brief story outline, and eventually consulted with several professors at the University of California, Santa Cruz; Harvard University; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who advised the filmmaker on theories of the future of the planet. The Dec 1986 issue of AmCin stated that the environmental aspects of the plot were inspired by Edward O. Wilson’s published study, Biophilia (1984), which warned that the Earth’s current rate of pollution would likely cause the extinction of 10,000 species each year by the 1990s.
       Various sources reported that a threatened Writers Guild of America (WGA) strike in Mar 1985 prolonged preproduction. Although Harve Bennett told the 30 Jan 1985 DV that he did not intend to write the script, he shares onscreen credit with first-time screenwriters Steve Meerson and Peter Krikes, and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982, see entry) director Nicholas Meyer, whom the 20 Dec 1985 LAHExam claimed had been hired to complete rewrites. According to a 15 Jun 1986 article in the San Jose Mercury News, Star Trek series creator and executive consultant Gene Roddenberry had final approval of the screenplay.
       During this time, actor William Shatner reportedly spent five months locked in a salary holdout with Paramount, claiming he would not return to the role of Captain Kirk unless he was paid $2 million. The 30 Jan 1985 DV announced that the studio had decided to grant Shatner’s request, and award him ten percent of the film’s net profits. Nimoy received the same deal due to a preexisting “Favored Nations” clause in their contracts, which guaranteed equal terms for the two stars. While the budget was set around $18 million—roughly $2 million more than The Search for Spock —Bennett did not attribute the increase to the actors’ salary demands. Although filming was originally scheduled to begin in Nov 1985, the LAHExam stated that production had been delayed until 18 Feb 1986, citing the recent decision by the CBS Television Network to pick up Shatner’s ongoing television series, T. J. Hooker (13 Mar 1982—28 May 1986) after it was canceled by ABC.
       Principal photography began a week later, on 24 Feb 1986, on Stage 9 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, CA, where the former “USS Enterprise” sets used in The Search for Spock had been redressed to stand in for the “USS Saratoga,” “USS Shepard,” and “USS Yorktown.” The following day, production relocated to San Diego, CA, for three days at the Naval Air Station North Island, to shoot scenes featuring “Uhura” and “Chekov” aboard the USS Ranger aircraft carrier. Additional Southern California locations included the Will Rogers State Park in Los Angeles, which doubled as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park; Centinela Hospital in Inglewood; and an industrial plant in Santa Ana.
       Back at Paramount, production designer Jack T. Collis constructed new sets for the “Starfleet” Federation Council Chamber and Starfleet Command center, but reused the interior bridge of “Kruge’s” “Klingon” warship from The Search for Spock, located on Stages 12 and 14. Time travel sequences were shot using a 110-ton capacity crane, which lifted and tilted the set to simulate turbulence. To depict its liftoff from “Vulcan,” a full-scale section of the ship’s exterior was built in the studio parking lot, while the shot of “Spock” on the planet surface was filmed at Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce, just north of Los Angeles. On 18 Mar 1986, Jane Wyatt filmed a scene with Nimoy at the Paramount studio, reprising her television role as Spock’s mother, “Amanda.”
       Beginning 15 Apr 1986, production spent ten days shooting in and around a 900,000-gallon tank of water known as Paramount’s “B” tank, which represented San Francisco Bay. Storm sequences were completed first, followed by scenes at the “Cetacean Institute,” which was constructed on a platform extending across the tank surface. The remainder of filming took place in the San Francisco Bay area, including the Monterey Bay Aquarium. According to the San Jose Mercury News, the Italian restaurant scene was shot on Stage 2 of the San Francisco Studios. Principal photography concluded 5 May 1986.
       Meanwhile, the visual effects team at Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) frequently visited the set to begin filming sequences that required the integration of live-action with miniatures, animation, and other optical effects. Although AmCin stated that additional units photographed live humpback whales in both San Francisco and Maui, HI, the majority of underwater scenes used full-scale and miniature mechanical creatures constructed under the supervision of Mike Lanteri. Crewmembers also used a large tank at the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace facility in Huntington Beach, CA, which was frequently occupied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to train astronauts for zero gravity conditions.
       For exterior shots of Starfleet Command headquarters, costumed actors were filmed walking across an empty tarmac at the Oakland International Airport in Oakland, CA, and later composited with a matte painting of twenty-third century “San Francisco.” Miniatures included a sixteen-foot recreation of the Golden Gate Bridge and refitted models of spacecraft from the previous films. According to AmCin, the ILM crew used as many recycled models and in-camera effects as possible in order to complete all visual effects work below the costs incurred for The Search for Spock. Despite earlier estimates, a 20 Mar 1986 DV article listed the total budget of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home at around $23 million.
       According to a 3 Dec 1986 Var brief, The Voyage Home was the first motion picture to be released using Dolby’s Spectral Sound process.
       On 17 Sep 1986, HR announced Paramount’s plan to move up the release date from 12 Dec 1986 to the Thanksgiving weekend. Although it opened in considerably fewer theaters than its predecessor, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home became the most profitable installment of the Star Trek series to date. Items in the 3 Dec 1986 DV and 1 Dec 1986 HR estimated five-day box-office earnings of $25.4—$26.5 million from 1,349 theaters. The 25 Nov 1986 DV reported that William Shatner was expected to attend a special benefit screening for the Juvenile Justice Connection Project on 4 Dec 1986 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater.
       Critical reception was largely positive. In his 17 Nov 1986 HR review, Bill Desowitz credited Nimoy’s “placid” direction for once again retaining the spirit of the television series and the relationships between its central characters. According to the 3 Jan 1987 LAHExam, the picture also received praise from various conservation groups, including the American Cetacean Society and Greenpeace USA, for raising public awareness about the endangerment of humpback whales. The Voyage Home was also the first Star Trek film to open in the Soviet Union, where it was shown as part of the Moscow Film Festival. An article in the 2 Jul 1987 Chicago Tribune reported that the screening, attended by Leonard Nimoy and Harve Bennett, was sponsored in part by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) as a symbol of appreciation for the Soviet government’s recent ban on whaling.
       Following its home video release later that year, a 31 Oct 1987 news item in Billboard magazine announced that New York-based retailer, RKO Warner Theatres Video, initiated a contribution drive to donate one dollar from each copy of Star Trek: The Voyage Home sold to benefit the Animal Welfare Institute’s Save the Whales campaign. Nimoy also provided voice-over narration for Paul Winter and Paul Halley’s album, “Whales Alive,” which was created as a companion piece to the film. The album featured humpback whale songs recorded by biologist Roger Payne, who provided audio tracks for the film, and a portion of the proceeds was donated to the WWF.
       Star Trek: The Voyage Home received Academy Award nominations for Best Cinematography, Music (Original Score), Sound, and Sound Effects Editing.
       Leonard Nimoy, William Shatner, and the rest of the principal cast returned for two additional installments, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989, see entry) and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991, see entry). Following the original Star Trek series and Star Trek: The Animated Series (NBC, 1973—1974), further television programs included Star Trek: The Next Generation (syndication, 1987—1994), Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (syndication, 1993—1999), Star Trek: Voyager (UPN, 1995—2001), and Star Trek: Enterprise (UPN, 2001—2005). The Next Generation also spawned four feature films. In 2009, filmmaker J. J. Abrams “rebooted” the original series characters for Star Trek (see entry) and its sequel, Star Trek Into Darkness (2013, see entry). As of 17 Mar 2016, a third film, Star Trek Beyond, is scheduled for release in summer 2016.
       Opening credits are preceded by the statement: “The cast and crew of Star Trek wish to dedicate this film to the men and women of the spaceship Challenger whose courageous spirit shall live to the 23rd century and beyond…”
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Star Trek is the trademark of Paramount Pictures Corporation and is registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office”; “The Producers extend special thanks to: Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey, California; Humpback whale sounds courtesy of Roger Payne and New York Zoological Society; Mark Ferrari and Debbie Glockner-Ferrari of the Humpback Whale Fund; Howard Weinstein; Nabisco; Apple Computer Company; Roy Danchick”; and, “The Producers also gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the Department of the Navy and the Department of the Defense, and the following individuals: RADM Charles Reynolds McGrail, Capt Walter Davis, Lt Sandra Stairs, Lt Lee Saunders, Mr. John Horton, and the Officers and Men of: USS Ranger; Marine Detachment, USS Ranger; U.S. Coast Guard, Long Beach; U.S. Coast Guard, San Francisco.”
       The name of 1st Sgt. Joseph Naradzay's character, "Marine sergeant," is misspelled onscreen as "Marine sargent." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 1986.
---
Billboard
31 Oct 1987.
---
Chicago Tribune
2 Jul 1987.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1984.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1985.
---
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1986
p. 10, 12.
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1986.
---
Daily Variety
25 Nov 1986.
---
Daily Variety
3 Dec 1986
pp. 18-19.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1986
p. 3, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1986.
---
LAHExam
20 Dec 1985.
---
LAHExam
3 Jan 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Nov 1986
Section H, p. 1, 11.
New York Times
26 Nov 1986
p. 14.
San Jose Mercury News
15 Jun 1986
Arts & Books, pp. 3-4.
Variety
19 Nov 1986
p. 16.
Variety
3 Dec 1986.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Also Starring:
as Sarek
and
as The Council President
as The Klingon ambassador
as Lt. Saavik
In old San Francisco:
Naval personnel:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Harve Bennett Production
A Leonard Nimoy Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Underwater dir of photog
Video supv
Elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const foreperson
Paint foreperson
Standby painter
Set des
Set des
Set des
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's ward supv
Men's ward supv
Men`s ward
Men`s ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Addl mus score by
Addl mus score by
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Utility
Sd eff
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley by
Foley by
ADR ed
Asst ed
Sd eff rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Title des
Title des
Visual eff prod at
Marin County, CA
Eff dir of photog, ILM
Visual eff art dir, ILM
Opt supv, ILM
Whale des & project supv, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Matte painting supv, ILM
Model shop supv, ILM
Anim supv, ILM
Gen mgr, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Prod mgr, ILM
Storyboard artist, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Asst cameraperson, ILM
Asst cameraperson, ILM
Asst cameraperson, ILM
Asst cameraperson, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt lineup, ILM
Opt lineup, ILM
Opt coord, ILM
Lab tech, ILM
Lab tech, ILM
Whale mold supv, ILM
Whale mechanical des, ILM
Whale op/Puppeteer, ILM
Whale op/Puppeteer, ILM
Underwater whale photog, ILM
Asst eff ed, ILM
Matte photog supv, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte photog, ILM
Chief modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Anim cam op, ILM
Anim cam op, ILM
Rotoscope artist, ILM
Visual consultant, ILM
Pyrotechnician, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Time travel, ILM
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Creatures created by
Computer anim and tactical displays
Video Images
Computer anim and tactical displays
Video Images
Computer anim and tactical displays
Computer anim and tactical displays
Novocom, Inc.
Computer anim and tactical displays
Novocom, Inc.
Computer anim and tactical displays
Novocom, Inc.
Computer anim and tactical displays
Chief eng
Process coord
Addl opt eff by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Addl hairstylist
Addl hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec consultant
Casting
Casting admin
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft services
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Voice casting
Asst to Mr. Nimoy
Asst to Mr. Bennett
Asst to Mr. Bennett
Asst to Mr. Winter
Asst to Mr. Roddenberry
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation capt
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt double for William Shatner
Stunt double for Leonard Nimoy
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the television series Star Trek created by Gene Roddenberry (NBC, 8 Sep 1966--3 Jun 1969).
SONGS
Theme from Star Trek television series, music by Alexander Courage
"Genesis Project," by Craig Huxley
"I Hate You," written by Kirk Thatcher, arranged by Mark Mangini
+
SONGS
Theme from Star Trek television series, music by Alexander Courage
"Genesis Project," by Craig Huxley
"I Hate You," written by Kirk Thatcher, arranged by Mark Mangini
performed by Edge of Etiquette.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Star Trek IV
Release Date:
26 November 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 November 1986
Production Date:
24 February--5 May 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
7 January 1987
Copyright Number:
PA313406
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
gauge
30mm, 35mm, 50mm, 75mm, 100mm
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
119
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28106
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Starfleet headquarters in San Francisco, California, in the year 2286, a Klingon ambassador demands the extradition of Admiral James “Jim” T. Kirk following the clandestine creation and subsequent destruction of the Genesis planet during the rescue of Captain Spock, which has threatened the peace between the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire. During the council, however, Spock’s father, Vulcan Ambassador Sarek, comes to Kirk’s defense. Although the Federation President promises justice for Kirk’s violations of Starfleet regulations, the Klingon ambassador storms out of the chamber swearing vengeance. After three months of exile on the planet Vulcan, Kirk and the crew of the late USS Enterprise modify a defunct Klingon warship, jokingly dubbed the HMS Bounty, and prepare to return to Earth to face the consequences of their actions. Spock decides to accompany them to offer testimony, and resumes his former position as First Science Officer, despite the concerns of Chief Medical Officer Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy, who points out that Spock has not fully regained his memory since the restoration of his katra. ... +


At Starfleet headquarters in San Francisco, California, in the year 2286, a Klingon ambassador demands the extradition of Admiral James “Jim” T. Kirk following the clandestine creation and subsequent destruction of the Genesis planet during the rescue of Captain Spock, which has threatened the peace between the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire. During the council, however, Spock’s father, Vulcan Ambassador Sarek, comes to Kirk’s defense. Although the Federation President promises justice for Kirk’s violations of Starfleet regulations, the Klingon ambassador storms out of the chamber swearing vengeance. After three months of exile on the planet Vulcan, Kirk and the crew of the late USS Enterprise modify a defunct Klingon warship, jokingly dubbed the HMS Bounty, and prepare to return to Earth to face the consequences of their actions. Spock decides to accompany them to offer testimony, and resumes his former position as First Science Officer, despite the concerns of Chief Medical Officer Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy, who points out that Spock has not fully regained his memory since the restoration of his katra. However, Kirk has confidence in his friend’s abilities, and the ship begins its journey home. Meanwhile, the USS Saratoga alerts Starfleet to the presence of an unidentified space probe headed toward Earth, which drains the power systems of everything in its path, creating violent weather patterns that ionize the Earth’s atmosphere. As Starfleet attempts to minimize the damage, the Federation President issues a planetary distress signal warning nearby vessels to avoid Earth at all costs. Upon receiving the transmission, communications Commander Nyota Uhura decodes the probe’s signals and discovers the sounds match the song of Earth’s humpback whales, which have been extinct since the twenty-first century. Spock deduces that an alien species in contact with the whales may have sent the probe to determine why communication was lost. Unable to authentically replicate the creatures’ language themselves, Kirk decides to send their ship back in time to the late twentieth century, retrieve a whale, and re-establish contact with the probe. Accelerating to full warp speed, the crew arrives in 1986 San Francisco, California. However, engineer Montgomery "Scotty" Scott warns that the trip has distressed the engine’s dilithium energy crystals, allowing them only twenty-four hours to remain hidden under the vessel’s cloaking device. To regain enough power to return home, Spock proposes finding a nuclear fission reactor and recharging the dilithium chamber with radioactive energy. As the ship touches down in Golden Gate Park, the crew divides into teams: Uhura and Pavel Chekov are assigned to find a new power supply for the warp core; Bones, Scotty, and Hikaru Sulu must locate a tank big enough to transport the whale; while Kirk and Spock follow the whale song to its source. Remembering that twentieth century humans have never seen extraterrestrial life before, Spock removes the belt from his Vulcan robes and uses it to cover his distinctively pointed ears. While studying a map of the city, Kirk sees a banner on the side of a bus advertising a pair of humpback whales housed at the Cetacean Institute in Sausalito. He and Spock board a bus to the aquarium, where they join a tour led by the institute’s assistant director, Dr. Gillian Taylor. Outside, Gillian shows them a holding pen containing two mature whales, which are being kept for research. As the group moves to view the whales through an underground observation tank, Kirk notices that Spock has jumped into the water and performed a Vulcan mind meld with one of the whales in attempt to communicate with it. Gillian is perturbed by his strange behavior, but the two friends leave before she can call police. Later, Gillian spots Kirk and Spock walking along the bay and offers them a lift back to San Francisco. During the drive, Gillian admits that once the whales are released into the wild, they are at great risk of being hunted. When Spock reveals the female whale is pregnant, Gillian demands to know their business. Kirk offers to explain over dinner, and Spock returns to the Bounty. Meanwhile, Scotty and Bones gain entry to a plexiglass manufacturing plant and bribe one of the workers to build them a large tank, which they beam aboard their ship. Across the bay in Alameda, Chekov and Uhura steal a nuclear reactor from a Naval base. However, Scotty loses transporter power before Chekov can return to the Bounty, leaving him at the mercy of the U.S. Navy, who believe he is a Russian spy. He attempts to flee, but falls off the side of a freighter and sustains critical head injuries. As Kirk and Gillian discuss the whales’ impending release scheduled for the following afternoon, Kirk reveals his identity and the truth of his mission. Although initially skeptical, Gillian drops off Kirk in Golden Gate Park and spends the rest of the evening contemplating his story. Early the next morning, Gillian learns that the whales were already transported to Alaska in order to avoid a media frenzy. Distressed, she returns to Golden Gate Park and calls out for Kirk’s help, even though she cannot see the ship under its cloaking device. Kirk beams her aboard, and she agrees to help the crewmembers retrieve Chekov from the hospital. Disguised as a contemporary surgeon, Bones breaks into the operating room and uses his advanced medical devices to repair the damage to Chekov’s brain. After narrowly escaping police, they beam back to the landing site. Although Kirk refuses to take Gillian with them to the future, she tricks him into beaming her onboard as they follow the whales’ projected course off the coast of Alaska. Once they locate the creatures, the crew rushes to beam them into the tank before they are captured by an approaching whaling ship. The transport is successful, and Sulu powers the Bounty into warp speed. They return to the twenty-third century and crash into San Francisco Bay in the midst of continuing storms. Unable to release the whales from their tank using the ship’s controls, Kirk dives underwater and manually opens the hatch. Once he and the rest of the crew swim to safety, they listen as the whales begin to sing, re-establishing communication with the probe. Receiving their message, the probe returns to its home planet in the depths of space, thereby restoring stability to the Earth’s atmosphere. As the whales swim toward the Pacific Ocean, the crewmembers rejoice. Sometime later, Kirk and his crew are put on trial for conspiracy, assault, sabotage, and the theft and destruction of the Enterprise. However, due to their recent heroism, the Federation President drops all charges and demotes Kirk to his former fleet position of starship captain. Gillian joins a science vessel and bids Kirk goodbye, but promises they will meet again. Before he returns to Vulcan, Sarek admits he is impressed by Spock’s actions during the rescue mission and no longer disapproves of his son’s decision to enroll in Starfleet. He remarks that Spock’s associates are people of admirable character, and Spock agrees, stating that they are his friends. Shuttling to the Starfleet space dock for their next mission, the crew is overjoyed to discover they will be piloting a newly outfitted reconstruction of the USS Enterprise. As they take their positions on the bridge, Kirk smiles and declares, “My friends…we’ve come home.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.