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HISTORY

Summary and credits for this unviewed film are derived from documents in AMPAS library files, and may not reflect what appears onscreen.
       According to an article by Elenita Ravicz that appeared in the 26 Jan 1985 LAT, the film took nine months to make, and cost approximately $140,000. The article noted that after its one-day screening in Los Angeles, the film was slated to be shown in San Diego, CA; Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; and New York, NY.
       The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Documentary ... More Less

Summary and credits for this unviewed film are derived from documents in AMPAS library files, and may not reflect what appears onscreen.
       According to an article by Elenita Ravicz that appeared in the 26 Jan 1985 LAT, the film took nine months to make, and cost approximately $140,000. The article noted that after its one-day screening in Los Angeles, the film was slated to be shown in San Diego, CA; Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; and New York, NY.
       The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Documentary Feature. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
26 Jan 1985
p. 2.
Variety
5 Mar 1986.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Unfinished Business: The Japanese American Internment Cases
Point of Order
Release Date:
26 January 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 26 January 1985 at Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Steven Okazaki
Copyright Date:
7 October 1987
Copyright Number:
PA358809
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Black and White
gauge
16mm
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
2,000
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Through contemporary interviews, archival footage, and sequencesfootage shot during performances of the play, Point of Order, which is based on the same subject, the film tells the stories of Gordon Hirabayashi, Fred Kormatsu, and Minoru Yasui, three Japanese-Americans who refused to be interned with 110,000 fellow Japanese-Americans that were forceably settled to U. S. internment camps during World War II. Their efforts to have their convictions for violating Executive Order 9066 overturned are also ... +


Through contemporary interviews, archival footage, and sequencesfootage shot during performances of the play, Point of Order, which is based on the same subject, the film tells the stories of Gordon Hirabayashi, Fred Kormatsu, and Minoru Yasui, three Japanese-Americans who refused to be interned with 110,000 fellow Japanese-Americans that were forceably settled to U. S. internment camps during World War II. Their efforts to have their convictions for violating Executive Order 9066 overturned are also detailed. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
World War II


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.