Youngblood (1986)

R | 110 mins | Drama | 31 January 1986

Director:

Peter Markle

Cinematographer:

Mark Irwin

Production Designer:

Alicia Keywan

Production Company:

Guber-Peters Company
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HISTORY

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, hockey played a major part in writer-director Peter Markle’s Minneapolis, MN, childhood, and he believed the sport would provide the right setting for a film. As the movie was inspired by events from his life, he also wanted to explore the theme of young adults facing their first life challenges.
       Hockey consultant Eric Nesterenko, a former Chicago Blackhawks player, had two months to train actors Rob Lowe and Patrick Swayze to reach a “Junior A level of proficiency,” which often requires as much as ten years of training. Swayze commented that the timing, coordination, and flexibility, he learned as a dancer helped him slip into the role of a hockey player. Lowe trained hard because he had never skated before, and supplemented his lessons with a weight-training program.
       Principal photography began Jul 1984. Instead of capturing the action from the stands or with aerial shots, Markle wanted the camera to show the player’s point of view. To follow players on the ice, director of photography Mark Irwin wore ice skates and used a wheelchair to maneuver across the rink to better capture the game’s excitement.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The Producers would like to thank the following: “Toronto Film Liaison Office, Minnesota Film Board, CCM (Hockey Equipment), Adidas, Canvin-Division of Campbell Soup, Chrysler Corporation of Canada Ltd., Imperial Tobacco Ltd., Kentucky Fried Chicken Ltd., Molson Breweries Ltd., Seven-Up Canada Inc., Shopper’s Drug Ltd., Tim Horton Donuts Ltd., Timex Canada ... More Less

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, hockey played a major part in writer-director Peter Markle’s Minneapolis, MN, childhood, and he believed the sport would provide the right setting for a film. As the movie was inspired by events from his life, he also wanted to explore the theme of young adults facing their first life challenges.
       Hockey consultant Eric Nesterenko, a former Chicago Blackhawks player, had two months to train actors Rob Lowe and Patrick Swayze to reach a “Junior A level of proficiency,” which often requires as much as ten years of training. Swayze commented that the timing, coordination, and flexibility, he learned as a dancer helped him slip into the role of a hockey player. Lowe trained hard because he had never skated before, and supplemented his lessons with a weight-training program.
       Principal photography began Jul 1984. Instead of capturing the action from the stands or with aerial shots, Markle wanted the camera to show the player’s point of view. To follow players on the ice, director of photography Mark Irwin wore ice skates and used a wheelchair to maneuver across the rink to better capture the game’s excitement.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The Producers would like to thank the following: “Toronto Film Liaison Office, Minnesota Film Board, CCM (Hockey Equipment), Adidas, Canvin-Division of Campbell Soup, Chrysler Corporation of Canada Ltd., Imperial Tobacco Ltd., Kentucky Fried Chicken Ltd., Molson Breweries Ltd., Seven-Up Canada Inc., Shopper’s Drug Ltd., Tim Horton Donuts Ltd., Timex Canada Ltd.”

More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 1986
p. 4, 41.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jan 1986
p. 8.
New York Times
31 Jan 1986
p. 10.
Variety
15 Jan 1986
p. 22.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
United Artists presents
A Guber-Peters Company production
A Peter Markle film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
3rd asst dir
Canadian prod mgr
Prod mgr, Minneapolis crew
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam asst
Cam asst
2d cam op
2d cam op
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
2d unit dir of photog
Chief lighting tech
Best boy
1st elec
Generator op
Key grip
Grip
Grip
Still photog
Cam op, Minneapolis crew
Asst cam, Minneapolis crew
Key grip, Minneapolis crew
Cam loader, Minneapolis crew
ART DIRECTORS
Vis consultant
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed, Canada
Asst ed, Canada
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Asst set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Construction mgr
Head carpenter
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward mistress
Ward asst
Ward, Minneapolis crew
MUSIC
Mus comp and performed by
Music supv
Mus comp and performed by
Mus ed
Mus exec
Mus supv, O.S.S.
Mus supv, O.S.S.
Mus supv for RCA
Mus supv for RCA
Mus mixer
Addl mus
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv rerec mixer
Sd eff mixer
Foley/ADR mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Sd, Minneapolis crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairdresser
Extras casting
Prod secy
Makeup, Minneapolis crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Visual consultant
Prod company
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Scr cont supv
Asst to Mr. Markle
Asst to Mr. Wells
Voice casting
Transportation coord
Driver capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Craft service
Canadian casting
Extras casting
Unit pub
Hockey consultant
Weight trainer
Skating trainer
Skating trainer
Prod accountant
Prod estimator
Prod secy
Office asst
Marketing consultant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod mgr, Minneapolis crew
Prod coord, Minneapolis crew
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Ain't Gonna Walk The Line,” performed by Kix Brooks, written and produced by Tena Clark
”I'm A Real Man,” written and performed by John Hiatt, courtesy of Geffen Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Soldier Of Fortune,” performed by Marc Jordan, written by Marc Jordan and John Capek
+
SONGS
“Ain't Gonna Walk The Line,” performed by Kix Brooks, written and produced by Tena Clark
”I'm A Real Man,” written and performed by John Hiatt, courtesy of Geffen Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Soldier Of Fortune,” performed by Marc Jordan, written by Marc Jordan and John Capek
“Footsteps,” performed by Nick Gilder, written by Nick Gilder and Jeff Silverman
“Something Real,” performed by Mr. Mister, written by Richard Page, John Lang and Steve George
“Don't Look Now,” performed by Torch Song, written by William Orbit and Laurie Mayer, courtesy of I.R.S. Records
“Winning Is Everything,” performed by Autograph, written by Steve Plunkett, Steve Lynch, Steven Isham, Keni Richards and Randy Rand
“On San Francisco Bay,” written by Max Hoffman
“Get Ready,” performed by Diana Ross and The Supremes, written by William Robinson, courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
“Talk Me Into It,” performed by Glenn Jones, written by Diane Warren
“Cut You Down To Size,” performed by Starship, written by Craig Chaquico and Mickey Thomas
“Stand In The Fire,” performed by Mickey Thomas, written by Diane Warren.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 January 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 31 January 1986
Production Date:
began July 1984
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corporation
Copyright Date:
12 February 1986
Copyright Number:
PA278798
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints in Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Seventeen-year-old American Dean Youngblood announces to his father, Blane, that he has been invited to try out for the Hamilton Mustang junior hockey team in Canada. History appears to be repeating itself since Dean’s older brother, Kelly, was forced to quit hockey after a career-ending eye injury. Blane insists that he needs his son to work on the farm, and cannot afford to hire someone to replace him, but Dean does not want to be a farmer. Kelly Youngblood believes Dean deserves a chance at professional sports. At the Mustangs practice rink, Dean distinguishes himself on the ice, and earns a spot on the team. A larger, aggressive player named Carl Racki is bitter when Mustangs coach, Murray Chadwick, informs him that Dean has been admitted to the team instead of him. In the following days, Dean endures his teammates’ practical jokes. Following player Derek Sutton’s lead, teammates shave off his pubic hair. Dean takes a room at Miss McGill’s boarding house for hockey players. She is known for her habit of serving tea to tenants and seducing them, and wastes no time making love to Dean. At a local bar, Dean learns about adoring fans, and social drinking with his teammates. The following day, Dean is hung over at practice and performs poorly. Coach Chadwick threatens to kick him off the team if he does not improve. At night, Dean runs into Jessie, a girl he saw hanging around the ice rink, outside a movie theater and follows her into a convenience store. She buys him a copy of Moby Dick to read on the team bus, and for ... +


Seventeen-year-old American Dean Youngblood announces to his father, Blane, that he has been invited to try out for the Hamilton Mustang junior hockey team in Canada. History appears to be repeating itself since Dean’s older brother, Kelly, was forced to quit hockey after a career-ending eye injury. Blane insists that he needs his son to work on the farm, and cannot afford to hire someone to replace him, but Dean does not want to be a farmer. Kelly Youngblood believes Dean deserves a chance at professional sports. At the Mustangs practice rink, Dean distinguishes himself on the ice, and earns a spot on the team. A larger, aggressive player named Carl Racki is bitter when Mustangs coach, Murray Chadwick, informs him that Dean has been admitted to the team instead of him. In the following days, Dean endures his teammates’ practical jokes. Following player Derek Sutton’s lead, teammates shave off his pubic hair. Dean takes a room at Miss McGill’s boarding house for hockey players. She is known for her habit of serving tea to tenants and seducing them, and wastes no time making love to Dean. At a local bar, Dean learns about adoring fans, and social drinking with his teammates. The following day, Dean is hung over at practice and performs poorly. Coach Chadwick threatens to kick him off the team if he does not improve. At night, Dean runs into Jessie, a girl he saw hanging around the ice rink, outside a movie theater and follows her into a convenience store. She buys him a copy of Moby Dick to read on the team bus, and for a lighter read, he purchases a book titled Nympho. As they walk down the street, Coach Chadwick appears, and informs Dean that he is Jessie’s father. She assures the coach that she will be home by her 10:30 PM curfew. She likes Dean, but her life will be easier if she avoids dating hockey players, and she walks home alone. During the Mustangs’ first game of the season, Dean scores an important goal. Nevertheless, the coach puts Dean on the bench for the rest of the game. Later, Dean flags down Jessie as she drives the Zamboni resurfacing machine over the ice. He explains that the coach benched him even though he played well to punish him for dating Jessie. Since Dean is being blamed for something he did not do, he asks Jessie out on a date. At a public skating session, he discovers that she knows how to skate. Even though Jessie pretends not to follow hockey or like hockey players, he finds that she does. She wonders how Dean’s life will turn out if he does not become a professional athlete. Dean recalls how he and his brother, Kelly, would skate all day on the pond at their farm. He was always faster than players several years older, and fully expects to turn pro. They go back to his room at the boarding house, and make love. The Hamilton Mustangs travel out of town to play the Thunder Bay Bombers. As the players skate onto the ice, the coach notices Carl Racki playing for the other team. The Bombers play aggressively, and after the first period, Coach Chadwick chastises his players for losing. When the second period ends with a big fight, the coach signals Dean to play in the third period, and he assists Derek in scoring a goal. The mood shifts as Carl Racki is rotated into play. He slams Derek into the boards. Dean and Derek scramble to avoid Racki, and Dean scores just before the game ends. As his teammates congratulate him, he observes Racki grab Derek’s helmet off his head and trip him. Derek lands hard on his back, and fractures his skull. Dean is shaken by Derek’s injury, and quits the team. He tells Jessie he is upset that he did not do more to defend Derek. Back at the Youngblood farm, Kelly accuses his younger brother of cowardice. Kelly reads articles that describe the implosion of the Mustangs without Dean and Derek on the ice. Later, Kelly gives Dean on how to box. Dean practices on a punching bag in the barn, and does weight training to improve his strength. His father also gets into the act, and teaches Dean a few tricks about how to win a fight on the ice. At the Memorial Cup Finals, Dean returns in time for the final championship game. He persuades the coach to let him suit up. Dean finds Derek in the locker room with a bandaged head. Derek’s advice is to forget about Racki and concentrate on winning. In the second period, the coach puts Dean in the game. He makes a goal and ties the score. Racki strikes Dean, who sustains a mouth injury. In the third period, Rachi will not leave Dean’s side. Nevertheless, Dean scores a goal with ten seconds remaining, resulting in another tie. Racki trips Dean, and the referee awards Dean a penalty shot. Dean scores with three seconds remaining. The coach wants to take Dean out of the game but the young man refuses to get off the ice. Dean faces off against Racki, and challenges him to a fight once the puck is in play. When Racki loses his stick, they continue with their fists. Racki lands a few punches, but Dean pulls Racki’s jersey over his head and defeats him. As Dean’s teammates hoist him in the air, Jessie leaves. Later, after the crowds are gone, Dean stands in the middle of the empty rink, and a few young fans ask for his autograph. Jessie appears and demands an autograph, too. She tells Dean that she loves him. However, his facial wounds make it too hard to kiss, and they walk together arm in arm. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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