Flight from Glory (1937)

60 mins | Drama | 20 August 1937

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HISTORY

RKO borrowed Chester Morris from Columbia for this production. According to HR , Preston Foster was first slated for the role of "Ellis." According to modern sources, planes used in the production included a Studio SE.5, a C-3 Stearman and possibly a Boeing ... More Less

RKO borrowed Chester Morris from Columbia for this production. According to HR , Preston Foster was first slated for the role of "Ellis." According to modern sources, planes used in the production included a Studio SE.5, a C-3 Stearman and possibly a Boeing 100. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Aug 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Sep 37
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 37
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 37
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
10 Aug 37
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Aug 37
p. 58.
New York Times
11 Sep 37
p. 20.
Variety
11 Aug 37
p. 19.
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 August 1937
Production Date:
late June--mid July 1937
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 August 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7369
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3529
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Short one pilot, Ellis, the greedy, heartless owner of the Trans-Andean Air Service of Delgado, Argentina, searches his files for the name of a recently suspended American aviator and finds George Wilson. When George arrives in Delgado with his bride Lee, he is shocked to discover a fleet of decrepit airplanes and a gang of washed-up, cynical pilots to greet him. Concerned for Lee's safety in the desolate, male-dominated village, George, who has a one-year contract with Ellis, suggests that she return to America. Lee, however, insists on staying in Delgado and, because he owes Ellis for travel expenses, George is unable to quit. During his first treacherous mountain flight with head pilot Smith, George, who was suspended in Connecticut when he crashed a plane while intoxicated and killed a bystander, numbs his fears with alcohol. Worried about George's drinking, Lee asks Ellis to transfer her husband to the easier coast route. Several weeks later, however, George is forced to fly the mountain delivery route with another plane, which crashes in front of him. Badly shaken by the sight, George returns to Delgado drunk and angry and accuses Lee, who has been befriended by Smith and Garth Hilton, a British pilot, of infidelity. Although Lee begs George to quit drinking, George persists until he is unable to fly his next scheduled trip. Out of love for Lee, Hilton takes George's assignment and crashes to his death in one of Ellis's "flying coffins." Filled with guilt, George confronts Ellis and accuses him of murdering his pilots out of greed. While Lee confesses to Smith that she loves him, George forces ... +


Short one pilot, Ellis, the greedy, heartless owner of the Trans-Andean Air Service of Delgado, Argentina, searches his files for the name of a recently suspended American aviator and finds George Wilson. When George arrives in Delgado with his bride Lee, he is shocked to discover a fleet of decrepit airplanes and a gang of washed-up, cynical pilots to greet him. Concerned for Lee's safety in the desolate, male-dominated village, George, who has a one-year contract with Ellis, suggests that she return to America. Lee, however, insists on staying in Delgado and, because he owes Ellis for travel expenses, George is unable to quit. During his first treacherous mountain flight with head pilot Smith, George, who was suspended in Connecticut when he crashed a plane while intoxicated and killed a bystander, numbs his fears with alcohol. Worried about George's drinking, Lee asks Ellis to transfer her husband to the easier coast route. Several weeks later, however, George is forced to fly the mountain delivery route with another plane, which crashes in front of him. Badly shaken by the sight, George returns to Delgado drunk and angry and accuses Lee, who has been befriended by Smith and Garth Hilton, a British pilot, of infidelity. Although Lee begs George to quit drinking, George persists until he is unable to fly his next scheduled trip. Out of love for Lee, Hilton takes George's assignment and crashes to his death in one of Ellis's "flying coffins." Filled with guilt, George confronts Ellis and accuses him of murdering his pilots out of greed. While Lee confesses to Smith that she loves him, George forces Ellis at gunpoint to join him on a flight across the mountains. As they approach the most dangerous leg of the route, George jumps out of the plane and leaves the unskilled Ellis to crash. Freed from all of their obligations, Lee and Smith pledge their love and return together to America. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.