Morgan Stewart's Coming Home (1987)

PG-13 | 96 mins | Comedy | 13 February 1987

Director:

Alan Smithee

Producer:

Stephen Friedman

Cinematographer:

Richard E. Brooks

Production Designer:

Charles C. Bennett

Production Company:

Kings Road Entertainment
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HISTORY

       End credits include “special thanks” to: Andrew Spaulding and the Virginia Film Office; The Washington D.C. Office of Motion Pictures and Television; Fashion Square Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia.
       End credits also state: “Helicopter provided by Worrell Newspapers; Miss Redgrave’s furs by Ben Kahn; Dresses and gowns by Adele Simpson, Judy Hornby and Neil Bieff; Jewels by Miriam Haskell; After Six Tuxedos; Kenneth Cole Shoes; Adidas.”
       Although the film is credited onscreen as being directed by Alan Smithee, that is the pseudonym the Directors Guild of America allowed at the time when a director wanted his name removed from a film. British director Terry Winsor, who had previously directed the 1982 British comedy Party, Party, was set to direct the film, initially titled Homefront, according to a 9 Aug 1985 DV report.
       However, four weeks after principal photography began on 30 Aug 1985, Winsor was fired and the production was shut down, according to a report in the 14 Nov 1985 LADN. Winsor was replaced by Paul Aaron, who reshot much of Winsor’s footage. According to the 22 Jan 1987 DV, the film’s budget was $7 million.
       The 4 May 1986 LAT reported Homefront was scheduled to be released in fall 1986, noting that the film had nothing to do with the recently released novel of the same name by Patti Davis, daughter of U.S. President Ronald Reagan. However, that fall release did not happen.
       By Jan 1987, the film’s name was changed to Morgan Stewart’s Coming Home and a 13 Feb 1987 regional release was ...

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       End credits include “special thanks” to: Andrew Spaulding and the Virginia Film Office; The Washington D.C. Office of Motion Pictures and Television; Fashion Square Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia.
       End credits also state: “Helicopter provided by Worrell Newspapers; Miss Redgrave’s furs by Ben Kahn; Dresses and gowns by Adele Simpson, Judy Hornby and Neil Bieff; Jewels by Miriam Haskell; After Six Tuxedos; Kenneth Cole Shoes; Adidas.”
       Although the film is credited onscreen as being directed by Alan Smithee, that is the pseudonym the Directors Guild of America allowed at the time when a director wanted his name removed from a film. British director Terry Winsor, who had previously directed the 1982 British comedy Party, Party, was set to direct the film, initially titled Homefront, according to a 9 Aug 1985 DV report.
       However, four weeks after principal photography began on 30 Aug 1985, Winsor was fired and the production was shut down, according to a report in the 14 Nov 1985 LADN. Winsor was replaced by Paul Aaron, who reshot much of Winsor’s footage. According to the 22 Jan 1987 DV, the film’s budget was $7 million.
       The 4 May 1986 LAT reported Homefront was scheduled to be released in fall 1986, noting that the film had nothing to do with the recently released novel of the same name by Patti Davis, daughter of U.S. President Ronald Reagan. However, that fall release did not happen.
       By Jan 1987, the film’s name was changed to Morgan Stewart’s Coming Home and a 13 Feb 1987 regional release was planned, according to the 22 Jan 1987 DV. Box office charts in the 18 Mar 1987 DV indicate the film had earned just under $800,000 in the month since its release.

      End credits include the following statements: “Scenes from The Brady Bunch courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation; People Weekly cover simulations by express permission of Time Incorporated. People Weekly is a registered trademark of Time, Inc.”

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1985
---
Daily Variety
22 Jan 1987
---
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1987
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1987
p. 3, 17
Los Angeles Daily News
14 Nov 1985
---
Los Angeles Times
4 May 1986
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Feb 1987
p. 12
New York Times
4 Jun 1987
p. 16
Variety
18 Feb 1987
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Kings Road Entertainment Presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
Story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Focus puller
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Addl photog
Spec still photog
Lighting equip supplied by
Cam and lenses by
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead set dresser
Set dresser
Asst set dresser
Prop master
Prop asst
Raymond M. Samitz
Const coord
Key set builder
Key set builder
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Dana Jean Cicerchi
Ward supv
Asst to Molly Maginnis
MUSIC
Mus supv
Asst mus supv
Supv mus ed
Supv mus ed
Addl mus comp and performed by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Title des
MAKEUP
Hair & make-up
Lynn Redgrave's make-up artist
Lynn Redgrave's hair des
for Glemby International
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Unit loc mgr
Scr supv
Scr supv
Prod coord
Project coord
Transportation capt
Promotion coord
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Asst auditor
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Washington loc asst
Studio mgr
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
Extras casting Virginia
Projectionist
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Christine Baur
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Painted Moon,” composed and performed by The Silencers, courtesy of RCA Records, copyright 1986 RCA Music, Ltd.; “Wipeout,” composed by the Surfaris, performed by Peter Bernstein, copyright 1963 Miraleste Music Company and Robin Hood Music Company; “Prince Of The City,” composed and performed by John Manikoff and Timothy Duckworth, copyright 1986 Rockmanikoff Music; “The Murder,” from The Psycho II soundtrack, composed and performed by Bernard Hermann, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc., copyright 1960 Ensign Music Corporation; “Gone Ridin’,” composed and performed by Chris Isaak, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc., by Arrangement with Warner Special Products, copyright 1985 Isaak Music Publishing Company.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Homefront
Release Date:
13 February 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 27 Feb 1987; New York opening: week of 1 Jun 1987
Production Date:
began 30 Aug 1985.
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Kings Road Entertainment, Inc.
3 December 1987
PA358784
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At the Boswell boarding school in rural Virginia, high school junior Morgan Stewart longs to be home with his parents. Since age ten, he has been expelled from eight different boarding schools after deliberately performing pranks, hoping his parents would let him return home. One day in December, Morgan is overjoyed when his headmaster tells him his parents have called him home. His mother, Nancy Stewart, picks him up in a helicopter and brings him to their new mansion outside of Washington, D.C. The butler, Ivan, shows him to his suite, where Morgan, a horror movie fan, decorates the room with movie memorabilia. When he sees his father’s limousine arrive, Morgan rushes out to greet him, but a security guard tackles the boy and pins him to the ground. Tom Stewart, a Republican senator in the United States Congress, tells the guard to let him go as he thinks the boy is his son, although Morgan has grown four inches since Tom last saw him. That night, Jay La Soto, Tom Stewart’s executive aid, informs Morgan he has been brought home to help with his father’s re-election campaign. Tom’s opponent, Thelma Daggett, a human rights attorney who has been compared to Eleanor Roosevelt, is far ahead in the polls. Jay plans to use Morgan prominently in their “Vote for the Family” campaign. Later, at a party, Morgan and his parents pose for photos, while Tom tells the press that family is the most important issue. Nancy introduces Morgan to his date, Heather Whitewood, a Young Republican who supports teen abstinence and worries about her acne. Morgan is unimpressed with Heather, but enjoys the buffet until his mother, who recently ...

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At the Boswell boarding school in rural Virginia, high school junior Morgan Stewart longs to be home with his parents. Since age ten, he has been expelled from eight different boarding schools after deliberately performing pranks, hoping his parents would let him return home. One day in December, Morgan is overjoyed when his headmaster tells him his parents have called him home. His mother, Nancy Stewart, picks him up in a helicopter and brings him to their new mansion outside of Washington, D.C. The butler, Ivan, shows him to his suite, where Morgan, a horror movie fan, decorates the room with movie memorabilia. When he sees his father’s limousine arrive, Morgan rushes out to greet him, but a security guard tackles the boy and pins him to the ground. Tom Stewart, a Republican senator in the United States Congress, tells the guard to let him go as he thinks the boy is his son, although Morgan has grown four inches since Tom last saw him. That night, Jay La Soto, Tom Stewart’s executive aid, informs Morgan he has been brought home to help with his father’s re-election campaign. Tom’s opponent, Thelma Daggett, a human rights attorney who has been compared to Eleanor Roosevelt, is far ahead in the polls. Jay plans to use Morgan prominently in their “Vote for the Family” campaign. Later, at a party, Morgan and his parents pose for photos, while Tom tells the press that family is the most important issue. Nancy introduces Morgan to his date, Heather Whitewood, a Young Republican who supports teen abstinence and worries about her acne. Morgan is unimpressed with Heather, but enjoys the buffet until his mother, who recently became a vegetarian, chastises him for eating meat, saying it causes acne. When Morgan gets home, he discovers all his horror movie memorabilia gone. His mother explains the press might be at the house, so she had it removed and burned.
Morgan is determined to make his parents act like a family, no matter what, and begins reading the book, The American Family in Crisis. He voluntarily begins doing chores around the house such as polishing the floors and washing the windows, but his mother chastises him, saying Stewarts do not do chores. The next day Morgan comes down to eat breakfast, but his parents are engrossed in the newspaper. Jay tells Morgan that his Aunt Matilda left him a silver dollar collection, so he has opened a safety deposit box at a local bank for him to store them. Morgan has never heard of Aunt Matilda, but nonetheless signs the papers for the box. When he asks for the key to the box, Jay says he will keep it as Morgan is too irresponsible. Nancy sends Morgan to the shopping mall to buy clothes appropriate for campaigning. Instead of getting suits, Morgan goes to the book store and finds George Romero, the director of the classic horror film Night of the Living Dead, doing a book signing. While waiting in line for an autograph, Morgan meets Emily and begins chatting about horror films with her. As they leave the book signing, Emily agrees to go on a date with Morgan to see Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. When he gets home, an ecstatic Morgan begins singing and dancing, saying he is in love. His parents fear he is on drugs and have a doctor examine him. Morgan explains to the doctor that his father has joined the ranks of the “political undead,” and that his mother often acts like he is “a sperm who chewed through her diaphragm like a piranha fish just to destroy her life.” The doctor tells his parents that Morgan is fine, just going through adolescence. Tom worries that they sent him to boarding school too early, but Nancy dismisses the notion. The next night, Morgan sneaks out of the house and borrows the family’s vintage Rolls Royce convertible to go on his date with Emily. Morgan gets along well with her family as they have dinner together. After the movie, Morgan and Emily chat on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and she agrees to go on another date with him. Meanwhile at home, the staff has reported the Rolls Royce stolen. The police handcuff Morgan when he returns, but his parents decline to press charges. However, Nancy grounds Morgan for the infraction and installs security cameras in his bedroom to monitor him. The next day, Morgan sneaks out of the house on his bicycle, but once in town, spots his father eating at an Arby’s fast food restaurant. Tom tells Morgan that he misses eating meat and that Nancy’s controlling behavior is exhausting, but he would not be in the Senate without her. Morgan laments that this is the first heart-to-heart conversation they have had since he came back. Later, Nancy catches Morgan sneaking back home and lengthens the period of his grounding. Emily rides her motorcycle to the mansion, explaining that she figured out who Morgan was through campaign photos. Morgan and Emily take a walk through the garden of the estate, but she accidentally trips. Morgan catches her, but they fall into the swimming pool. They rush inside to get out of their wet clothes and take a warm shower together. However, Nancy catches them, sends Emily away, and announces they are sending Morgan to military school. Morgan refuses to go and uses a bat to knock down the security cameras inside the house. Jay tells Morgan that Millhouse Military School will make a man of him and General Fenton will be there shortly. Jay locks Morgan in his bedroom, but before doing so, Morgan swipes the safe deposit box key from Jay’s coat pocket. Morgan uses his Texas Chainsaw Massacre chainsaw to cut his way through his locked bedroom door, then goes to Emily’s to say goodbye. Morgan plans to run away and goes to the bank to get Aunt Matilda’s silver dollars to finance his new life. But once he opens the safe deposit box, he finds $500,000 in one hundred dollar bills as well as records showing how the money was laundered from Tom’s Senate campaign fund. Meanwhile, Jay goes to Tom and Nancy, telling them he has papers they signed connecting them to the laundered money. Jay, who was paid off by the opposition, demands Tom withdraw from the election or he will release the information to the press. Cadets from Millhouse Military School guard the property, but Morgan sneaks in wearing a disguise. Jay catches him, but Emily helps him escape on her motorcycle. Jay and the cadets give chase. As Tom begins his resignation speech, Morgan stops him, tossing the receipt book to him. Jay and the cadets chase Morgan around the grounds until Jay’s Jeep ends up in the swimming pool. Jay is arrested and sent to jail. Morgan escorts Emily to the junior prom. The Stewart family takes a vacation together and Tom wins his reelection bid. The family ends up on the cover of People magazine.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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