Fandango (1985)

PG | 91 mins | Comedy | 25 January 1985

Director:

Kevin Reynolds

Writer:

Kevin Reynolds

Producer:

Tim Zinnemann

Cinematographer:

Thomas Del Ruth

Production Designer:

Peter Lansdown Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros.
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HISTORY

       According to the 30 Jan 1985 DV, writer-director Kevin Reynolds’ short film, Proof, was made while he was a student at the University of Southern California, and was sent by his agent to Amblin Entertainment in 1981. After viewing the film, Steven Spielberg suggested that Reynolds make an extended, feature length version with Amblin’s backing. Amblin initially planned to produce the picture independently for $1 million, but later teamed with Warner Bros. Pictures, which increased the budget to $7 million.
       The 18 Mar 1983 DV reported that principal photography was set to begin in Apr 1983 in TX, and the 13 Apr 1983 Var announced that filming was underway in various TX locales.
       According to the 27 Aug 1984 issue of People magazine, Warner Bros. delayed the release of Fandango in part because the unknown cast made the picture “unreleasable.” Reynolds also noted script problems with the film after viewing the first cut, and in Mar 1984, Spielberg, who was an uncredited executive producer, granted a four-day reshoot. Warner Bros. finally decided on a limited release in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, set for 28 Sep 1984. However, the 29 Jan 1985 LAHExam announced the picture was finally released in New York City late Jan 1985, and earned a reported a $50,437 gross from twenty-seven theaters. As stated in the 25 Apr 1985 HR, , the picture was eventually released in Los Angeles on 26 Apr 1985.
      The film begins with the dictionary definition of “fandango: 1. a lively Spanish dance in rhythm varying from ... More Less

       According to the 30 Jan 1985 DV, writer-director Kevin Reynolds’ short film, Proof, was made while he was a student at the University of Southern California, and was sent by his agent to Amblin Entertainment in 1981. After viewing the film, Steven Spielberg suggested that Reynolds make an extended, feature length version with Amblin’s backing. Amblin initially planned to produce the picture independently for $1 million, but later teamed with Warner Bros. Pictures, which increased the budget to $7 million.
       The 18 Mar 1983 DV reported that principal photography was set to begin in Apr 1983 in TX, and the 13 Apr 1983 Var announced that filming was underway in various TX locales.
       According to the 27 Aug 1984 issue of People magazine, Warner Bros. delayed the release of Fandango in part because the unknown cast made the picture “unreleasable.” Reynolds also noted script problems with the film after viewing the first cut, and in Mar 1984, Spielberg, who was an uncredited executive producer, granted a four-day reshoot. Warner Bros. finally decided on a limited release in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, set for 28 Sep 1984. However, the 29 Jan 1985 LAHExam announced the picture was finally released in New York City late Jan 1985, and earned a reported a $50,437 gross from twenty-seven theaters. As stated in the 25 Apr 1985 HR, , the picture was eventually released in Los Angeles on 26 Apr 1985.
      The film begins with the dictionary definition of “fandango: 1. a lively Spanish dance in rhythm varying from slow to quick 3/4 time. 2. music for this. 3. a foolish act.” End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special thanks to the states of Texas and Oklahoma and the Confederate Air Force for their assistance in making this motion picture.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1983.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1985
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1985
p. 3, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1985.
---
LAHExam
29 Jan 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Apr 1985
p. 13.
New York Times
25 Jan 1985
p. 10.
People
27 Aug 1984.
---
Variety
13 Apr 1983.
---
Variety
23 Jan 1985
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
From Amblin Entertainment
Amblin Entertainment
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec recordist
Supv sd ed
Dialogue ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles, Cinema Research
Titles des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Aerial coord
Prod secy
Asst to Kevin Reynolds
Unit pub
Extras casting
Asst to Mary Goldberg
Post prod supv
Select memorabilia
STAND INS
Airplane chase
"Truman" stunt pilot
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 January 1985
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 January 1985
Los Angeles opening: 26 April 1985
Production Date:
began April 1983 in Texas
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 April 1985
Copyright Number:
PA252452
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27476
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On 15 May, 1971, in Austin, Texas, a group of college boys, calling themselves “The Groovers,” celebrate their graduation at a house party, awaiting to toast their friend, Kenneth Waggener, for his upcoming wedding. When Kenneth arrives, however, he announces that he is calling off his wedding because he has been drafted to fight in the Vietnam War, and fellow “Groover” Gardner Barnes reveals he has also been drafted. The two men cheer, and Gardner decides they should leave immediately for a farewell road trip, joined by "Groovers" Philip Hicks, Dorman, and Lester. Philip is determined to drive Kenneth to Dallas, Texas, where his wedding is set to take place, but Gardner insists the wedding is cancelled, and directs his friends to the Mexican border to recover something the boys buried called “Dom,” during a previous adventure. As they drive, Gardner remembers a lost love, but declares that he was never serious about any of his past relationships. Later, Philip’s car breaks down, and the boys hitch the automobile to a passing train, which tears off the front bumper. They push the car to a small town service station where they are forced to spend the night. At a car hop, Gardner flirts with two girls, who offer to show the boys around town. Although the girls are too young for the college graduates, Gardner insists they spend the evening with them. At a cemetery, the group shoots off fireworks, and, as the rockets explode, Kenneth worries about going to Vietnam. Gardner tells his friend that he does not have to go, and later mentions fleeing to Canada, which ... +


On 15 May, 1971, in Austin, Texas, a group of college boys, calling themselves “The Groovers,” celebrate their graduation at a house party, awaiting to toast their friend, Kenneth Waggener, for his upcoming wedding. When Kenneth arrives, however, he announces that he is calling off his wedding because he has been drafted to fight in the Vietnam War, and fellow “Groover” Gardner Barnes reveals he has also been drafted. The two men cheer, and Gardner decides they should leave immediately for a farewell road trip, joined by "Groovers" Philip Hicks, Dorman, and Lester. Philip is determined to drive Kenneth to Dallas, Texas, where his wedding is set to take place, but Gardner insists the wedding is cancelled, and directs his friends to the Mexican border to recover something the boys buried called “Dom,” during a previous adventure. As they drive, Gardner remembers a lost love, but declares that he was never serious about any of his past relationships. Later, Philip’s car breaks down, and the boys hitch the automobile to a passing train, which tears off the front bumper. They push the car to a small town service station where they are forced to spend the night. At a car hop, Gardner flirts with two girls, who offer to show the boys around town. Although the girls are too young for the college graduates, Gardner insists they spend the evening with them. At a cemetery, the group shoots off fireworks, and, as the rockets explode, Kenneth worries about going to Vietnam. Gardner tells his friend that he does not have to go, and later mentions fleeing to Canada, which Philip rejects. In the morning, the car is repaired, and as the road trip resumes, Philip expresses his anger toward Gardner for abandoning his obligations, and at Kenneth, for calling off his wedding. When they see a sign advertising a parachute school, Gardner challenges Philip to jump from an airplane. Philip, who is afraid of heights, agrees to jump if Kenneth promises not to dodge the draft. After taking a short course with a marijuana-smoking pilot named Truman Sparks, Philip boards the airplane. While on the ground, his friends realize that a bag of laundry was mistakenly replaced with Philip’s parachute. Frantically, they spell out a message telling him not to jump, but Philip does not see it, and jumps anyway, pulling his reserve chute moments before hitting the ground, and landing safely. Gardner and Kenneth rush to his side and apologize for their argument. Later, the friends continue their journey and hike to the remote site where “Dom” is buried. After digging, Gardner reveals a bottle of Dom Pérignon champagne, and the friends toast their future. Kenneth expresses his regret about calling off his wedding, prompting Gardner, unbeknownst to his friend, to telephone Kenneth’s fiancé, Debbie. She agrees to take Kenneth back, and Gardner recruits Truman to quickly fly Debbie to meet them. Meanwhile, Gardner and Philip prepare for the surprise ceremony. When Debbie arrives, she is revealed to be Gardner’s previous girl friend, whom he still thinks about. Kenneth is excited to see Debbie, and they embrace in reunion. That evening, the couple is married in the town square. Kenneth is grateful to Gardner, who later shares a dance with the bride. Together, they perform a Spanish “fandango.” Debbie kisses Gardner on the cheek, and then walks away. After the newlyweds depart, Gardner climbs a hill and raises a bottle in honor of his friends. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.