The Outing (1987)

R | 126 mins | Horror | 11 September 1987

Directors:

Tom Daley, Warren Chaney

Writer:

Warren Chaney

Producer:

Warren Chaney

Cinematographer:

Herbert Raditschnig

Editor:

Claudio Cutry

Production Designer:

Robert Burns

Production Company:

H.I.T. Films
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HISTORY

The home video version viewed by AFI was titled The Lamp.
       The Outing cost just over $2 million, according to a 23 May 1986 Back Stage item. However, an article in the Nov 1986 AmCin cited the production budget as $3 million.
       Neil Summers was announced as part of the cast in a 30 Apr 1986 Var item, but he is credited as stunt coordinator.
       Principal photography for The Lamp was slated to begin on 31 Mar 1986, as noted in the 14 Mar 1986 DV production chart, but was delayed until the week of 7 Apr 1986, according to the 17 Apr 1986 HR. The twenty-five-day shoot took place entirely in Houston, TX, with the exception of an opening sequence shot in Los Angeles, CA. The bulk of filming took place in the Houston Museum of Natural History. Filming concluded on 8 May 1986.
       According to the Nov 1986 AmCin, the body of “the Jinn” was modeled after bodybuilder-turned-actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, and molded out of 3,000 pounds of wet clay. Latex and foam rubber were also used to build the creature, which stood twenty feet tall (including the twelve-foot liquid nitrogen tank upon which it was anchored), with a twenty-three-foot arm span. The creature was operated pneumatically, and by push-pull cables. Its eyes and mouth moved via “servos.” An underwater sequence in which the unseen Jinn attacks a man in a pool was shot with the camera inside a fish tank, with the lens half underwater.
       The 23 May 1986 Back Stage stated that executive producer ... More Less

The home video version viewed by AFI was titled The Lamp.
       The Outing cost just over $2 million, according to a 23 May 1986 Back Stage item. However, an article in the Nov 1986 AmCin cited the production budget as $3 million.
       Neil Summers was announced as part of the cast in a 30 Apr 1986 Var item, but he is credited as stunt coordinator.
       Principal photography for The Lamp was slated to begin on 31 Mar 1986, as noted in the 14 Mar 1986 DV production chart, but was delayed until the week of 7 Apr 1986, according to the 17 Apr 1986 HR. The twenty-five-day shoot took place entirely in Houston, TX, with the exception of an opening sequence shot in Los Angeles, CA. The bulk of filming took place in the Houston Museum of Natural History. Filming concluded on 8 May 1986.
       According to the Nov 1986 AmCin, the body of “the Jinn” was modeled after bodybuilder-turned-actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, and molded out of 3,000 pounds of wet clay. Latex and foam rubber were also used to build the creature, which stood twenty feet tall (including the twelve-foot liquid nitrogen tank upon which it was anchored), with a twenty-three-foot arm span. The creature was operated pneumatically, and by push-pull cables. Its eyes and mouth moved via “servos.” An underwater sequence in which the unseen Jinn attacks a man in a pool was shot with the camera inside a fish tank, with the lens half underwater.
       The 23 May 1986 Back Stage stated that executive producer Fred T. Kuehnert was in talks with distributors, and hoped for a Halloween 1986 release. A 26 Aug 1987 Var brief noted the title change from The Lamp to The Outing, and reported that TMS Pictures would release the film on 11 Sep 1987. Foreign theatrical rights were acquired by Skouras Pictures, as noted in a 31 Dec 1986 DV news item.
       Critical reception was poor. An advertisement in the 20 Oct 1987 HR reported box-office grosses, to date, of $1,078,525 in “only 22% of the country.”
       End credits include the following statement: “The producers extend a special thanks to: The Rainbow Lodge; Joe and Mary West; Star Laser Force; Nike; Pepsi Cola; NBC-KPRC, Channel 2, Houston; KKBQ AM/FM Houston; Benetton; Ted Thomas; Friendswood Independent School District; Guy N. Stout; Mike Gilles; Chase, Lord and Co.; Chief John Bales and Sgt. Mel Gidson and the Houston Police Department; Steve Moore and the Houston Film Commission; Governor Mark White and the Texas Film Commission.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Nov 1986
pp. 29-30.
Back Stage
23 May 1986.
---
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1986.
---
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1986
p. 1, 17.
Daily Variety
1 Oct 1987
p. 3, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Sep 1987
Calendar, p. 7.
Variety
30 Apr 1986.
---
Variety
26 Aug 1987.
---
Variety
7 Oct 1987
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
H.I.T. Films Presents
A Warren Chaney Production
A Tom Daley Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Prod mgr, California crew
1st asst dir, California crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Dolly grip
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Best boy (Elec)
Key grip
Elec
Generator op
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
1st asst cam, California crew
2d asst cam, California crew
Steadicam op, California crew
Gaffer, California crew
Best boy (Elec), California crew
Elec, California crew
Key grip, California crew
Best boy, California crew
Grip, California crew
Lighting equip by
Arriflex cameras and Lightflex systems provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
Spec visual consultant
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst props and sets
Const supv
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward asst
Seamstress
Seamstress
Ward runner
MUSIC
Synthesizer programmer
Source mus coord
Starstream Communications Group, Inc.
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Post-production by
Post prod coord
Re-rec by
Re-rec by
Re-rec by
Sd des
Dial ed
ADR ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Foley mixer
Foley walker
Foley walker
Sd realization
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff coord
Spec eff mechanical supv
Spec eff makeup coord
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff contact lenses
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec photog eff by
Des and supv, Technomagic Film Effects
Prod coord, Technomagic Film Effects
Printer op, Technomagic Film Effects
Line-up, Technomagic Film Effects
Rotoscope, Technomagic Film Effects
Graphics, Technomagic Film Effects
Spec eff makeup, California crew
Spec eff, California crew
Spec computer graphics provided by
Cubicomp op
Cubicomp op
MAKEUP
Makeup and hair stylist
Makeup and hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Snake wrangler
Extras casting
Acting coach
Prod coord
Transportation coord
Lead driver
Lead driver
Lead driver
Lead driver
Lead driver
Lead driver
Comptroller
Loc auditor
Auditor
Asst to Mr. Daley
Asst to Mr. Kuehnert
Asst. to Dr. Chaney
1st prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Film lab messenger
Craft services
Office coord
Prod coord, California crew
Scr supv, California crew
Transportation coord, California crew
Transportation, California crew
Asst in prod, California crew
Studio facility
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
"Something To Think About," written and performed by Rick DeLano, published by Cumba Music, Inc.
"Wild Side Of Me," written by Tom DeLuca and Taylor Rhodes, performed by Taylor Rhodes, published by Gennaro Music Company - Delamus, Inc., master owned by Delamus, Inc.
"Entertain Yourself," written by Tom DeLuca and Taylor Rhodes, performed by Taylor Rhodes, published by Gennaro Music Company - Delamus Inc., master owned by Delamus, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Something To Think About," written and performed by Rick DeLano, published by Cumba Music, Inc.
"Wild Side Of Me," written by Tom DeLuca and Taylor Rhodes, performed by Taylor Rhodes, published by Gennaro Music Company - Delamus, Inc., master owned by Delamus, Inc.
"Entertain Yourself," written by Tom DeLuca and Taylor Rhodes, performed by Taylor Rhodes, published by Gennaro Music Company - Delamus Inc., master owned by Delamus, Inc.
"Largo Al Factotum" from Il Barbiere Di Siviglia ( The Barber of Seville ), composed by G. Rossini, performed by Roy Alan Wilson
"Deborah Says Yes," composed by Bruce Miller, performed by Bruce Miller and Joel Rosenbaum
"Last Mistake," written and performed by Barry Coffing, published by Tyrell Mann
"It's So Beautiful," composed by Joel Rosenbaum, performed by Joel Rosenbaum and Bruce Miller.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Lamp
Release Date:
11 September 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 11 September 1987
Production Date:
early April--8 May 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Lamp Productions, Inc., and Lamp Joint Venture
Copyright Date:
2 February 1988
Copyright Number:
PA359169
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
126
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28301
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1893 Galveston, Texas, a young Arab woman wears a magic bracelet as she lies helpless on a boat. A ship captain runs for help, but is killed by an evil spirit, or “Jinn.” Many years later, the Arab woman, now elderly, is robbed in her home and killed with a hatchet. Her attacker, Harley, discovers a hidden chest with a magic lamp. He rubs the lamp and removes a red jewel at its tip. Smoke emerges and the Jinn kills Harley and his two accomplices. The next day, police investigate the crime scene. The magic lamp and bracelet are ignored as evidence, and instead delivered to Dr. Wallace, the curator of the Museum of Natural Science in Houston, Texas. Wallace and his partner, Dr. Theo Bressling, study the lamp. Bressling determines that it is a very old artifact from the Middle East, once owned by a magician. Meanwhile, Wallace’s teenage daughter, Alex, stops by the museum and complains that he works too much. With her mother gone, she feels she has no home life. As the argument escalates, Alex wishes her father dead, but immediately apologizes. Wallace leaves the room, and she notices the magic bracelet in a box of artifacts. Alex tries it on, and cannot get it off. She notices the lamp’s red jewel responding to the bracelet. The next day, she and her classmates take a field trip to her father’s museum. There, Dr. Wallace greets Eve Ferrell, Alex’s teacher, with whom he is romantically involved, and they make a dinner date. As they tour the museum, Alex’s friends concoct a scheme to sleep there overnight. Her jealous ex-boyfriend, Mike Daley, overhears and decides ... +


In 1893 Galveston, Texas, a young Arab woman wears a magic bracelet as she lies helpless on a boat. A ship captain runs for help, but is killed by an evil spirit, or “Jinn.” Many years later, the Arab woman, now elderly, is robbed in her home and killed with a hatchet. Her attacker, Harley, discovers a hidden chest with a magic lamp. He rubs the lamp and removes a red jewel at its tip. Smoke emerges and the Jinn kills Harley and his two accomplices. The next day, police investigate the crime scene. The magic lamp and bracelet are ignored as evidence, and instead delivered to Dr. Wallace, the curator of the Museum of Natural Science in Houston, Texas. Wallace and his partner, Dr. Theo Bressling, study the lamp. Bressling determines that it is a very old artifact from the Middle East, once owned by a magician. Meanwhile, Wallace’s teenage daughter, Alex, stops by the museum and complains that he works too much. With her mother gone, she feels she has no home life. As the argument escalates, Alex wishes her father dead, but immediately apologizes. Wallace leaves the room, and she notices the magic bracelet in a box of artifacts. Alex tries it on, and cannot get it off. She notices the lamp’s red jewel responding to the bracelet. The next day, she and her classmates take a field trip to her father’s museum. There, Dr. Wallace greets Eve Ferrell, Alex’s teacher, with whom he is romantically involved, and they make a dinner date. As they tour the museum, Alex’s friends concoct a scheme to sleep there overnight. Her jealous ex-boyfriend, Mike Daley, overhears and decides to sabotage the slumber party. Although Alex is initially reluctant to break museum rules, the Jinn is released from the lamp and briefly takes over her body. In this state, Alex manipulates her father and a museum security guard, allowing her friends to sneak into the museum basement. In the meantime, Dr. Theo Bressling is killed by the Jinn. Believing that his daughter has gone home, Dr. Wallace goes to dinner with Eve Ferrell. He proposes marriage, and she accepts. In the museum basement, Alex and her boyfriend, Ted Pinson, are joined by two other couples. When one of the girls, Babs, spills beer on her pants, she and her boyfriend, Ross, go to the specimen room to clean up. Mike Daley and his friend, Tony Greco, sneak into the basement and trap Alex and Ted in one room, while the Jinn floats into the specimen room and kills Ross. The evil spirit opens jars filled with poisonous snakes that kill Babs. In another basement room, Gwen sends her boyfriend, Terry, to fetch her a beer. Mike and Tony break into the room wearing masks, and find Gwen alone. Mike rapes Gwen while Tony watches. The Jinn interrupts, killing the two boys and Gwen. Terry is horrified when he wanders into the specimen room and finds Babs and Ross dead. He is killed by a snake that slithers up his pants leg. Responding to their friends’ screams, Alex and Ted find them dead. Meanwhile, at dinner with Eve, Dr. Wallace realizes that Alex never went home. He calls the museum and becomes concerned when no one answers. He and Eve drive to the museum, where a door mysteriously opens to let them in. Alex and Ted find the security guard dead in the control room. The Jinn possesses a mummy on display, and uses it to kill Ted. The traumatized Alex is relieved to see her father and Eve. The Jinn takes on the form of a monster and chases them. Dr. Wallace looks through Theo Bressling’s research, and discovers that the lamp must be destroyed to kill the Jinn. He flees the museum with Eve and Alex. They run through the woods, where the Jinn kills Dr. Wallace, then possesses his body in an attempt to trick Eve and Alex. Knowing she must destroy the lamp, Alex returns to the museum, finds it, and throws it into the incinerator. In the early morning, police escort Alex and Eve out of the museum. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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