Spaceballs (1987)

PG | 96 mins | Comedy, Science fiction | 1987

Director:

Mel Brooks

Producer:

Mel Brooks

Cinematographer:

Nick McLean

Editor:

Conrad Buff, IV

Production Designer:

Terence Marsh

Production Company:

Brooksfilms
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HISTORY

The working title for the film, Planet Moron, was changed due to its similarity to the 1985 British film title, Morons from Outer Space, according to a 15 Oct 1984 DV news item.
       The film opens with the following written prologue: “Once upon a time warp…In a galaxy very, very, very, very, far away there lived a ruthless race of beings known as…Spaceballs. Chapter Eleven. The evil leaders of Planet Spaceball, having foolishly squandered their precious atmosphere, have devised a secret plan to take every breath of air away from their peace-loving neighbor, Planet Druidia. Today is Princess Vespa’s wedding day. Unbeknownst to the princess but knownst to us, danger lurks in the stars above…If you can read this, you don’t need glasses.” The receding text parodies the opening prologue of Star Wars (1977, see entry). As in Star Wars, no opening credits appear except for the film’s title.
       The end credits contain a “special thanks” the following individuals and organizations: Jerry and Bob Greenberg; U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management; “Public Lands U.S.A., Use, Share and Appreciate”; Winnebago Industries, Inc.; Lark Luggage Company; Goody Products, Inc.; and Calico M-100 Rifles by Calico Company. As noted in the credits, second assistant director Mitchell Bock also appeared in the role of "Video operator."
       Spaceballs marked Mel Brooks’s return to directing after a six year hiatus, as stated in an 8 Mar 1987 LAT article. Having previously filmed Blazing Saddles (1974, see entry), a satire of the western genre, and Young Frankenstein (1974, see entry), ... More Less

The working title for the film, Planet Moron, was changed due to its similarity to the 1985 British film title, Morons from Outer Space, according to a 15 Oct 1984 DV news item.
       The film opens with the following written prologue: “Once upon a time warp…In a galaxy very, very, very, very, far away there lived a ruthless race of beings known as…Spaceballs. Chapter Eleven. The evil leaders of Planet Spaceball, having foolishly squandered their precious atmosphere, have devised a secret plan to take every breath of air away from their peace-loving neighbor, Planet Druidia. Today is Princess Vespa’s wedding day. Unbeknownst to the princess but knownst to us, danger lurks in the stars above…If you can read this, you don’t need glasses.” The receding text parodies the opening prologue of Star Wars (1977, see entry). As in Star Wars, no opening credits appear except for the film’s title.
       The end credits contain a “special thanks” the following individuals and organizations: Jerry and Bob Greenberg; U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management; “Public Lands U.S.A., Use, Share and Appreciate”; Winnebago Industries, Inc.; Lark Luggage Company; Goody Products, Inc.; and Calico M-100 Rifles by Calico Company. As noted in the credits, second assistant director Mitchell Bock also appeared in the role of "Video operator."
       Spaceballs marked Mel Brooks’s return to directing after a six year hiatus, as stated in an 8 Mar 1987 LAT article. Having previously filmed Blazing Saddles (1974, see entry), a satire of the western genre, and Young Frankenstein (1974, see entry), a satire of the horror genre, Brooks said that he drew inspiration for Spaceballs from science fiction films such as Star Wars (1977, see entry), Star Trek (1979, see entry), and Alien (1979, see entry).
       Brooks and his writing partners, Thomas Meehan and Ronny Graham, worked on the script for two years, going through roughly eight drafts, according to a 27 Oct 1986 HR article. Since the film heavily parodied the Star Wars trilogy, Brooks wrote a letter to George Lucas and received approval from Lucasfilm to openly spoof Star Wars under the condition that the production not engage in any merchandising endeavors, an agreement which was upheld, according to the 8 Mar 1987 LAT article.
       In addition to directing, Brooks played the roles of “President Skroob” and “Yogurt.” According to production notes found at AMPAS library, Brooks was allergic to the gold makeup central to Yogurt’s costume, so the scenes featuring Yogurt had to be shot out of sequence to give Brooks a reprieve from the adverse effects of the makeup. Bill Pullman, who was cast in the role of “Lone Starr” after being told that “he was a long-shot” for the part, initially caught Brooks’s attention in his screen debut as “Earl” in Ruthless People (1986, see entry). In the 27 Oct 1986 HR article, Brooks stated that Pullman was a risky choice for a leading man given his relative obscurity, but expressed confidence in the actor’s comic timing. Lorene Yarnell, who played the role of “Dot Matrix,” was a famous mime noted for her work in the team of Shields and Yarnell; actress-comedian Joan Rivers provided the voice of Dot Matrix, as stated in the Aug 1987 issue of Cinefex. According to a 10 Dec 1986 “Just for Variety” piece in DV , it took four men to help Yarnell into her costume, which, Cinefex stated, was a “brass-plated styrene suit constructed by the physical effects crew.” The costume for John Candy’s character, a half-man, half-dog named “Barf,” featured moving ears and tail. According to production notes, Candy, who wore a “thirty-pound battery pack” that powered the costume, was able to control the movement of Barf’s tail through a “push-button device hidden in his jump suit”; however, Barf’s ears were remotely controlled by two technicians assigned to separate ears. Candy spent roughly three hours each day undergoing makeup for the role, according to the 10 Dec 1986 DV. Making an appearance in a cameo role as himself, John Hurt flew to set for one day of shooting as a favor to Brooks, whom he had befriended while working on the Brooksfilms, Ltd., production, The Elephant Man, (1980, see entry).
       According to the 27 Oct 1986 HR article, filming began 28 Oct 1986, with a budget of $22.7 million, as stated in the 8 Mar 1987 LAT article. Production notes specified that the first location was a California desert near Yuma, AZ, which doubled for the arid moon of “Plant Vega.” There, extras were hired from a nearby U.S. Marine base to play “Dark Helmet’s” Spaceball troops. Hoping for cooler, fall weather, the filmmakers were disappointed to find the desert unusually hot for mid-Oct, registering the highest temperatures in the country at the time. Scenes shot on location in and around Los Angeles, CA, included the marriage sequences between Vespa and Valium, filmed at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Pacific Palisades. Sound stages at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s (MGM) old studio in Culver City were used to house the sets, as stated in production notes. The bridge of Dark Helmet’s ship, the “Spaceball One,” was built on Stage 30, and Yogurt’s underground temple was built on Stage 27, the same stage on which yellow-brick road sequences for “The Wizard of Oz” (1939, see entry) were filmed.
       The design of Spaceball One was inspired by the Japanese battleship, Yamato, “the most heavily armed ship ever built,” according to the Aug 1987 Cinefex. Lone Starr’s vessel, the “Eagle 5,” was created out of a real Winnebago Chieftain, modified to have “delta wings, a radar antenna and … ‘hyper jets’,” as stated in production notes. Production designer Terence Marsh had not had any previous interest in designing science fiction films but said “Spaceballs” appealed to him because “it was obviously crazy.”
       In order to make the summer release date stipulated by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc., the visual effects team was allowed to begin working before the end of principal photography and before any of the film had been presented to test audiences, as stated in the Aug 1987 Cinefex. Since it parodied high-quality effects films, visual effects supervisor Peter Donen was adamant that Spaceballs look as realistic as possible. Apogee, Inc., was selected as the “prime effects contractor,” having been instrumental in the creation of a new Kodak film stock called 5295, which was “optimized for visual effects,” and used previously for one scene in Star Trek IV (1986, see entry). Spaceballs became the first film to use 5295 “for all its live-action bluescreen work.” According to production notes, a very large bluescreen system was created, employing nearly fifty blue fluorescent light panels, to produce the sweeping space vistas visible outside the windows of Spaceball One.
       Spaceballs opened in a limited number of theaters on Wednesday, 24 Jun 1987, earning $1,287,995 in box-office receipts at the 1,201 screens on which it played, according to a 26 Jun 1987 HR news item. That Friday, MGM widened the release to 1,385 screens. The film performed equally well in all regions of the country during its initial limited release, and David Forbes, MGM/UA’s distribution president at the time, was confident that the film would have a strong opening weekend. A 5 Oct 1987 Los Angeles Business Journal article reported that the film had taken in $38 million at the box office, to that time.
       In his 8 Mar 1987 LAT article, Patrick Goldstein commented that there was a great deal riding on the success of Spaceballs, due to Brooks’s six-year hiatus leading up to the film; however, critical reception was mixed. On 22 Jun 1987, HR reviewer Duane Byrge acknowledged the film’s humorous moments but criticized the dialogue and dated gags. In a more negative review, the 22 Jun 1987 DV accused the film of “misfir[ing] on all cylinders” and criticized Brooks’ direction as well as the film’s failure to offer anything new or innovative. In his review on 24 Jun 1987, Roger Ebert from the Chicago Sun-Times noted that the film’s dialogue could be “painfully juvenile” but lauded Brooks’s sight gags. The only aspects of the film that seemed to consistently receive favorable comments were the technical credits, namely production design and costume design, although, on 25 Jun 1987, an LAT review suggested the film may have fared better with a lower budget and an aesthetic to match its “tacky” humor.
       While the 10 Dec 1986 DV specified that there would be no sequels to Spaceballs, an animated television show called Spaceballs: The Animated Series was created by Brooksfilms Ltd. in collaboration with MGM, G4 and Berliner Film Companie GmbH, as announced by a 21 Sep 2006 HR news brief. The series, with an initial schedule of thirteen episodes, was set to launch in fall 2007; however, according to a 19 Sep 2008 Chicago Tribune item, Spaceballs: The Animated Series first aired 21 Sep 2008 on G4, following an airing of the film. Brooks and Joan Rivers reprised their film roles in the series, along with Daphne Zuniga, who played “Princess Vespa.”



The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Anjuli M. Singh, an independent scholar.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Sun-Times
24 Jun 1987.
---
Chicago Tribune
19 Sep 2008.
---
Cinefex
Aug 1987.
---
Daily Variety
15 Oct 1984.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jul 1986.
---
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1986.
---
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1987.
---
Daily Variety
12 May 1987.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1987
p. 3, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1986
p. 3, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 2006
p. 4, 14.
Los Angeles Business Journal
5 Oct 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Mar 1987
Section L, p. 1, 23, 44.
Los Angeles Times
18 May 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1987
p. 1.
New York Times
24 Jun 1987
p. 23
People
18 Nov 1985.
---
Variety
24 Jun 1987
p. 12.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
Asst lighting tech
2d grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
2d dolly grip
Elec
Video playback op
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Addl editing by
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set des
Junior set des
Prop master
Const coord
Gen foreman
Const foreman
Propmaker foreman
Labor foreman
Paint foreman
Standby painter
Asst prop master
Prop illustrator
Drapery man
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Cost des
Women's ward supv
Men's ward supv
Cost key person
Cost key person
Cost key person
Cost, Wedding seq
Cost, Wedding seq
Cost, Wedding seq
Cost, Wedding seq
MUSIC
Mus ed
Orch
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod sd
Prod sd
Prod sd
Post prod sd services provided by
A division of Lucasfilm Ltd.
Sd des/Rerec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Sd des, Sprocket Systems
Rerec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Rerec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Vocal eff supv, Sprocket Systems
Supv dial ed, Sprocket Systems
Dial ed, Sprocket Systems
Dial ed, Sprocket Systems
Dial ed, Sprocket Systems
Sd eff ed, Sprocket Systems
Sd eff ed, Sprocket Systems
Sd eff ed, Sprocket Systems
Sd eff ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Foley rec, Sprocket Systems
Foley artist, Sprocket Systems
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff-craft services
Spec eff-craft service
Spec eff sculptor
Barf ear animatronics
Visual eff coord
Visual eff prod asst
Spec visual eff by
Exec in charge of prod, Apogee, Inc.
Spec visual eff prod, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam op, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam op, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam op, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam op, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Opt supv, Apogee, Inc.
Opt cam op, Apogee, Inc.
Opt cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Opt cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Opt cam asst, Apogee, Inc.
Eff anim supv, Apogee, Inc.
Anim illustrator, Apogee, Inc.
Anim illustrator, Apogee, Inc.
Asst ed, Apogee, Inc.
Prod coord, Apogee, Inc.
Chief model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model maker, Apogee, Inc.
Model dept spec des, Apogee, Inc.
Model dept spec des, Apogee, Inc.
Visual eff art dir, Apogee, Inc.
Chief set lighting tech, Apogee, Inc.
Visual eff matte tech, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control electronics eng, Apogee, Inc.
Visual eff eng, Apogee, Inc.
Eff tech, Apogee, Inc.
Eff tech, Apogee, Inc.
Eff tech, Apogee, Inc.
Motion control programmer, Apogee, Inc.
Chief prod auditor, Apogee, Inc.
Eff prod publicist, Apogee, Inc.
The Alien Monster created by
Marin County, California
Mgr, Industrial Light & Magic
Project supv spec eff, creature, Industrial Light
Matte painting eff by
Matte painting eff by
Matte painting eff by
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by
Title des by
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Make-up des and created by
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup spec eff
Makeup spec eff
Makeup spec eff
Makeup spec eff
Makeup spec eff
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
& Associates
Casting, Lynn Stalmaster & Associates
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod controller
Accountant
Accountant
Asst to Mr. Brooks
Asst to Mr. Swerdlow
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Candy
Asst to Mr. Meehan & Mr. Graham
Asst to Mr. Meehan & Mr. Graham
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
First aid
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
"Spaceballs," written by Jeff Pescetto, Clyde Lieberman and Mel Brooks, performed by The Spinners, produced by Jellybean
"My Heart Has a Mind of Its Own," written by Gloria Sklerov and Lenny Macaluso, performed by Kim Carnes and Jeffrey Osborne, produced by George Duke and Jeffrey Osborne
"Heartstrings," by Robert P. Brill, Matt Reid Cohn, John Buckner Crawford, and Terri Kathleen Nunn, performed by Berlin, produced by Bob Ezrin, courtesy of Geffen Records and PolyGram International Music BV, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
"Spaceballs," written by Jeff Pescetto, Clyde Lieberman and Mel Brooks, performed by The Spinners, produced by Jellybean
"My Heart Has a Mind of Its Own," written by Gloria Sklerov and Lenny Macaluso, performed by Kim Carnes and Jeffrey Osborne, produced by George Duke and Jeffrey Osborne
"Heartstrings," by Robert P. Brill, Matt Reid Cohn, John Buckner Crawford, and Terri Kathleen Nunn, performed by Berlin, produced by Bob Ezrin, courtesy of Geffen Records and PolyGram International Music BV, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Good Enough," by Michael Anthony, Sammy Hagar, Alex Van Halen, and Eddie Van Halen, performed by Van Halen, produced by Van Halen, Mick Jones and Donn Landee, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Raise Your Hands," written by Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora, performed by Bon Jovi, produced by Bruce Fairbairn, courtesy of PolyGram Records
"Hot Together," by Sharon Robinson, performed by The Pointer Sisters, produced by Richard Perry, courtesy of RCA Records
"Wanna Be Loved By You," performed by Ladyfire, produced by Michael Lloyd.
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DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Planet Moron
Release Date:
1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 June 1987
Production Date:
began 28 October 1986 in Southern California
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 August 1987
Copyright Number:
PA339100
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Metrocolor®
Lenses/Prints
Panaflex® cameras and lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28661
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Evil leader Dark Helmet heads a mission to replenish the air supply on his home planet, Spaceball, hoping to steal air from Planet Druidia. Although he plans to gain access to Druidia, which is protected by an air shield, by kidnapping Princess Vespa of Druidia after she leaves for her honeymoon, the princess escapes the planet early, abandoning her fiancée, Prince Valium, at the altar. Meanwhile, the Eagle 5, a modified recreational vehicle, flies through space carrying Lone Starr, a gruff young pilot, and Barf, half-man and half-dog. Lone Starr and Barf receive a video call from a thug named Pizza the Hutt, who says they owe him one million space bucks by the next day. On Planet Spaceball, President Skroob learns that Dark Helmet’s ship, Spaceball One, is approaching Vespa’s spacecraft, and he orders Dark Helmet to “take her alive.” To save Vespa from the Spaceballs, King Roland, Vespa's father, contacts Lone Starr and Barf and agrees to pay them one million space bucks in exchange for returning her safely to Druidia. The Eagle 5 locates Vespa’s ship, locked in Spaceball One’s magnetic beam, and Lone Starr and Barf launch a jar of jam at Spaceball One’s radar, thereby “jamming” the equipment and allowing them to rescue Vespa, along with her servant, Dot Matrix, and all of Vespa’s luggage. Once Spaceball One’s magnetic beam pulls Vespa’s ship inside, Dark Helmet finds it empty and realizes Lone Starr has taken her. At that moment, the Eagle 5 goes into “hyperactive mode” and speeds away; giving chase, Dark Helmet tells his crew to switch to “ludicrous speed,” causing Spaceball One to overshoot Lone Starr’s vessel. Soon after, the Eagle 5 ... +


Evil leader Dark Helmet heads a mission to replenish the air supply on his home planet, Spaceball, hoping to steal air from Planet Druidia. Although he plans to gain access to Druidia, which is protected by an air shield, by kidnapping Princess Vespa of Druidia after she leaves for her honeymoon, the princess escapes the planet early, abandoning her fiancée, Prince Valium, at the altar. Meanwhile, the Eagle 5, a modified recreational vehicle, flies through space carrying Lone Starr, a gruff young pilot, and Barf, half-man and half-dog. Lone Starr and Barf receive a video call from a thug named Pizza the Hutt, who says they owe him one million space bucks by the next day. On Planet Spaceball, President Skroob learns that Dark Helmet’s ship, Spaceball One, is approaching Vespa’s spacecraft, and he orders Dark Helmet to “take her alive.” To save Vespa from the Spaceballs, King Roland, Vespa's father, contacts Lone Starr and Barf and agrees to pay them one million space bucks in exchange for returning her safely to Druidia. The Eagle 5 locates Vespa’s ship, locked in Spaceball One’s magnetic beam, and Lone Starr and Barf launch a jar of jam at Spaceball One’s radar, thereby “jamming” the equipment and allowing them to rescue Vespa, along with her servant, Dot Matrix, and all of Vespa’s luggage. Once Spaceball One’s magnetic beam pulls Vespa’s ship inside, Dark Helmet finds it empty and realizes Lone Starr has taken her. At that moment, the Eagle 5 goes into “hyperactive mode” and speeds away; giving chase, Dark Helmet tells his crew to switch to “ludicrous speed,” causing Spaceball One to overshoot Lone Starr’s vessel. Soon after, the Eagle 5 runs out of fuel and crash-lands on the moon of Planet Vega. Angry with Lone Starr, Vespa calls him an “idiot” over the intercom, but when they meet face-to-face for the first time, Vespa and Lone Starr find themselves attracted to one another. As they disembark in search of help, Lone Starr tells Vespa she should only bring what she needs to survive, but Lone Starr and Barf end up dragging her many pieces of luggage through the desert landscape. Back on Spaceball One, Dark Helmet’s aide, Colonel Sandurz, suggests they use “Spaceballs: The Movie,” an ongoing film of their lives, to find the Eagle 5. Explaining that they can fast-forward through the movie to see the future, Sandurz and his men locate Lone Starr’s crew. That night, Vespa and Lone Starr bond by a campfire in the desert while Barf and Dot Matrix sleep. Lone Starr tells Vespa he was an orphan raised by monks and that the only clue to his identity is a pendant with cryptic writing he cannot decipher. After Vespa remarks that his pendant is beautiful, they almost kiss, but Dot Matrix’s “virgin alarm” goes off and they are separated. The next morning, the crew of the Eagle 5 collapse after trekking through the desert in the hot sun, and a group of Dinks, small men in hooded robes, come to the rescue, leading them to an underground temple. There, they meet Yogurt, a small, golden man who is the keeper of “the Schwartz,” a powerful force respected throughout the universe. Yogurt lends Lone Starr his Schwartz ring and gives him a lesson in harnessing the power. Meanwhile, President Skroob orders Dark Helmet to “comb the desert” in search of Vespa, and Dark Helmet takes the instruction literally, forcing his crew to run large combs over the desert sands. After finding the entrance to Yogurt’s lair, Dark Helmet, who possesses a Schwartz ring like Yogurt’s, uses the Schwartz to take on the form of King Roland and lure Vespa outside. Dot Matrix follows, and Dark Helmet kidnaps them both. Finding Vespa and Dot Matrix gone, Lone Starr and Barf refuel the Eagle 5, and Yogurt gives Lone Starr a parting gift of a fortune cookie and his Schwartz ring. Meanwhile, Dark Helmet makes a video call to King Roland and threatens to undo Vespa’s rhinoplasty if Roland doesn’t give him the pass code to the Druidia air shield. Before the first surgical incision, Roland relents and offers the code: 12345. Later, the Eagle 5 lands in Spaceball City at a prison complex where Vespa and Dot Matrix are being held. Lone Starr and Barf steal the uniforms of two guards and sneak inside, where they release Vespa and Dot Matrix from their cell and battle their way out. Meanwhile, Spaceball One approaches Druidia and transforms into “Mega Maid,” giving the ship the appearance of a giant maid with a vacuum cleaner. As Druidia’s shield opens and Mega Maid sucks the air out, the Eagle 5 approaches. Lone Starr uses Yogurt’s Schwartz ring to reverse the vacuum, returning the air to Druidia; afterward, he flies the Eagle 5 into the ear of the Mega Maid, climbs out of his ship, and knocks out two guards on his way to Mega Maid’s self-destruct mechanism. Before Lone Starr can push the self-destruct button, however, Dark Helmet appears, announcing that he is Lone Starr’s father’s brother’s nephew’s cousin’s former roommate, and therefore has no problem killing him. After they engage in a battle of Schwartz beams, light sabers that emerge from their respective rings, Lone Starr sends Dark Helmet backward into the self-destruct button. During the three-minute period before the ship erupts, the crew of Spaceball One escapes to safety, leaving behind Dark Helmet, President Skroob, and Colonel Sandurz. Lone Starr flies the Eagle 5 out of Spaceball One and through the Druidia air shield seconds before Mega Maid explodes. As they approach King Roland’s castle, Barf and Lone Starr see a news report that Pizza the Hutt is dead. Though Barf rejoices that they will be able to keep their one million space bucks, Lone Starr seems disappointed. Later, as Lone Starr and Barf leave Druidia, Vespa is dressed in wedding attire once again and led down the aisle to marry Prince Valium. During the ceremony, Vespa finds out that Lone Starr refused the payment from King Roland and realizes that he must love her. Back on the Eagle 5, a hungry Lone Starr and Barf decide to split the fortune cookie Yogurt gave them. When Barf breaks the cookie, Yogurt magically appears and explains to Lone Starr that the pendant he wears is a royal birth certificate, meaning that Lone Starr is a prince. On an unnamed planet, the head of the Mega Maid crashes onto a beach where two clothed apes ride on horseback and watch, disappointed, as Dark Helmet, President Skroob, and Colonel Sandurz climb out of the head. Back on Druidia, Vespa delays saying her vows and hears the Eagle 5 approach. After Lone Starr barges into the wedding and announces that he is a prince, he and Vespa marry and, later, fly away in the Eagle 5. Yogurt’s motto, “May the Schwartz Be With You,” appears behind them in the stars.
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Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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