Orchids to You (1935)

73-74 mins | Drama | 12 July 1935

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HISTORY

According to news items, the title was taken from newspaper columnist and radio celebrity Walter Winchell's popular phrase of especial commendation. According to the Toledo News Bee , Winchell summed up the film by stating, "Scallions for Fox Film Co." In addition to singing "Sylvia," which is called by HR an "ever-popular" ballad and was written in 1914, John Boles sings an unidentified nursery rhyme. According to news items in Mar 1935, Clive Brook was originally scheduled to play the male lead. News items additionally note that Jean Muir was borrowed from Warner Bros. and wore fifteen gowns; that William A. Seiter landed a long-term contract with Fox after this film; and that Shirley Temple kept the doll house used in the film. Shooting was completed a day and a half ahead of schedule, according to a HR news ... More Less

According to news items, the title was taken from newspaper columnist and radio celebrity Walter Winchell's popular phrase of especial commendation. According to the Toledo News Bee , Winchell summed up the film by stating, "Scallions for Fox Film Co." In addition to singing "Sylvia," which is called by HR an "ever-popular" ballad and was written in 1914, John Boles sings an unidentified nursery rhyme. According to news items in Mar 1935, Clive Brook was originally scheduled to play the male lead. News items additionally note that Jean Muir was borrowed from Warner Bros. and wore fifteen gowns; that William A. Seiter landed a long-term contract with Fox after this film; and that Shirley Temple kept the doll house used in the film. Shooting was completed a day and a half ahead of schedule, according to a HR news item. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27-Jul-35
---
Columbus (Ohio) State Journal
28-Aug-35
---
Daily Variety
10 Jun 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
10 Aug 35
p. 4.
HF
4 May 35
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 35
p. 2, 6
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 35
p. 4.
Modern Screen
1-Oct-35
---
Motion Picture Daily
11 Jun 35
p. 22, 28
Motion Picture Herald
8 Jun 35
p. 94.
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jun 35
p. 70.
New York Times
10 Aug 35
p. 16.
Toledo News Bee
7-Sep-35
---
Variety
14 Aug 35
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Addl dial and comedy seq
Contr on spec seq
Contr on spec seq
Contr to trmt
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"Sylvia," words by Clinton Scollard, music by Oley Speaks.
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 July 1935
Production Date:
27 April-25 May 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 July 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5842
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73-74
Length(in feet):
6,640
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
954
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The board of directors of New York's exclusive Ritz Plaza skyscraper want Teddy Stuyvesant, their befuddled stockholder with a controlling interest, to grant them power of attorney to allow them not to renew the lease of one of their commercial tenants so that a branch of a bank can open in its place in the lobby. Teddy, who does not know that the tenant in question is florist Camellia Rand, who has many times refused his marriage proposals, interrupts the meeting before he signs to go propose to Camellia again. Thomas Bentley, the attorney for the hotel, believes that Camellia can easily be beaten because, being a woman, she will get emotional. She refuses his demands, however. Soon she learns that one of her customers, man-about-town George Draper, is having an affair with Tom's wife Evelyn, who is unhappy with her husband's obsession with work. On Easter Sunday, Camellia goes with Teddy to an orphanage, where they see "Professor Hippo," actually Tom, who grew up in the orphanage, in a long-haired wig and mustache, entertaining the children with magic tricks. When Camellia introduces him to Teddy, she discovers that Teddy is the stockholder with controlling interest, and Teddy, discovering that Camellia is the tenant, refuses to sign Tom's paper. Accepting defeat, Tom hires Camellia to arrange flowers for his third wedding anniversary, hoping to show Evelyn that he has turned over a new leaf regarding his attention to her. However, she cancels their dinner to be with Draper, while saying that her sick mother needs her. At the Spring Flower Show, Draper's wife Alice tells Camellia that she is going to divorce her ... +


The board of directors of New York's exclusive Ritz Plaza skyscraper want Teddy Stuyvesant, their befuddled stockholder with a controlling interest, to grant them power of attorney to allow them not to renew the lease of one of their commercial tenants so that a branch of a bank can open in its place in the lobby. Teddy, who does not know that the tenant in question is florist Camellia Rand, who has many times refused his marriage proposals, interrupts the meeting before he signs to go propose to Camellia again. Thomas Bentley, the attorney for the hotel, believes that Camellia can easily be beaten because, being a woman, she will get emotional. She refuses his demands, however. Soon she learns that one of her customers, man-about-town George Draper, is having an affair with Tom's wife Evelyn, who is unhappy with her husband's obsession with work. On Easter Sunday, Camellia goes with Teddy to an orphanage, where they see "Professor Hippo," actually Tom, who grew up in the orphanage, in a long-haired wig and mustache, entertaining the children with magic tricks. When Camellia introduces him to Teddy, she discovers that Teddy is the stockholder with controlling interest, and Teddy, discovering that Camellia is the tenant, refuses to sign Tom's paper. Accepting defeat, Tom hires Camellia to arrange flowers for his third wedding anniversary, hoping to show Evelyn that he has turned over a new leaf regarding his attention to her. However, she cancels their dinner to be with Draper, while saying that her sick mother needs her. At the Spring Flower Show, Draper's wife Alice tells Camellia that she is going to divorce her husband and after exhibiting his florist bill from her shop, demands to know to whom the flowers were sent. Camellia, who has grown fond of Tom, refuses to tell. After Alice hires Tom, an acquaintance of the Drapers, to represent her, Evelyn, fearing that Camellia will reveal her secret, tells her that she wants to make amends with her husband and offers Camellia the name of a woman who has agreed to testify that the flowers were sent to her. Camellia refuses to go along and icily states that she will not reveal Evelyn's identity. During the Drapers' divorce trial, Camellia refuses Tom's demands that she name the woman, and she is sentenced to ten days in jail for contempt as the divorce action fails. When she returns to her shop after serving her time, she finds it filled with customers attracted by the trial's publicity. Teddy, trying to help out, has taken over as manager. When Tom comes to apologize to Camellia, Teddy interrupts them with what he thinks is a mistake in the books: that a bill sent to Draper should instead have been sent to Tom because the orchids were sent to Tom's wife. Now realizing his wife's infidelity, Tom reopens divorce proceedings, after which he takes a world cruise for a year. Next Easter, the children at the orphanage are bored as Teddy tries to entertain them dressed as Professor Hippo to Camellia's piano accompaniment. When Tom arrives and takes Teddy's place, the audience responds excitedly. Afterward, Tom proposes to Camellia and she accepts. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.