Teen Wolf Too (1987)

PG | 95 mins | Fantasy | 20 November 1987

Director:

Christopher Leitch

Producer:

Kent Bateman

Cinematographer:

Jules Brenner

Production Designer:

Peg McClellan

Production Companies:

Atlantic Motion Pictures , Paramount
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HISTORY

       Teen Wolf Too is a sequel to Teen Wolf (1985, see entry), which starred actor Michael J. Fox as high school student, “Scott Howard,” who could turn into a werewolf at will. Fox opted not to reprise his role for this sequel, so producers cast actor Jason Bateman as “Todd Howard,” the first cousin of the “Scott Howard” character. Teen Wolf Too marked the feature-film debut for Bateman who had previously appeared in many television shows and made-for-television movies, as the 14 Sep 1987 HR reported. Bateman’s father, Kent Bateman, served as the film’s producer.
       While Fox did not return, two actors from the first movie did reprise their roles. James Hampton, who played “Harold Howard,” the father of Fox’s character in the original, returned to appear as the uncle to Bateman’s character. Mark Holton, who played the schoolmate “Chubby” in the original, also returned. Two other characters from the first movie appear in the sequel, played by different actors. Paul Sand played “Coach Billy Finstock” in the sequel, whereas Jay Tarses played the role in the original. Stuart Fratkin played “Rupert ‘Stiles’ Stilinski” in this movie, but Jerry Levine played the character in the original.
       Principal photography began on 1 Jun 1987, according to the 23 Jun 1987 HR production chart. The 30 Jun 1987 DV reported the film shot on location at Claremont Colleges in Claremont, CA, about thirty miles east of Los Angeles, CA. The 2 Feb 1987 DV reported the budget was $4-$7 million.
       Teen Wolf Too opened on 1,540 screens on 20 Nov 1987, earning ... More Less

       Teen Wolf Too is a sequel to Teen Wolf (1985, see entry), which starred actor Michael J. Fox as high school student, “Scott Howard,” who could turn into a werewolf at will. Fox opted not to reprise his role for this sequel, so producers cast actor Jason Bateman as “Todd Howard,” the first cousin of the “Scott Howard” character. Teen Wolf Too marked the feature-film debut for Bateman who had previously appeared in many television shows and made-for-television movies, as the 14 Sep 1987 HR reported. Bateman’s father, Kent Bateman, served as the film’s producer.
       While Fox did not return, two actors from the first movie did reprise their roles. James Hampton, who played “Harold Howard,” the father of Fox’s character in the original, returned to appear as the uncle to Bateman’s character. Mark Holton, who played the schoolmate “Chubby” in the original, also returned. Two other characters from the first movie appear in the sequel, played by different actors. Paul Sand played “Coach Billy Finstock” in the sequel, whereas Jay Tarses played the role in the original. Stuart Fratkin played “Rupert ‘Stiles’ Stilinski” in this movie, but Jerry Levine played the character in the original.
       Principal photography began on 1 Jun 1987, according to the 23 Jun 1987 HR production chart. The 30 Jun 1987 DV reported the film shot on location at Claremont Colleges in Claremont, CA, about thirty miles east of Los Angeles, CA. The 2 Feb 1987 DV reported the budget was $4-$7 million.
       Teen Wolf Too opened on 1,540 screens on 20 Nov 1987, earning $3 million in its first three days of release, according to the 24 Nov 1987 DV box office report.
       In 2011, a Teen Wolf television series based on the movie series debuted on the MTV cable network.

      End credits state: “Special thanks to: Carole Little; Tuf-Wear; Everlast; The Claremont Colleges; L.A. Gear.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1987
p. 1, 22.
Daily Variety
30 Jun 1987.
---
Daily Variety
20 Nov 1987
p. 3, 8.
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1987
p. 3, 32.
Los Angeles Times
20 Nov 1987
p. 14.
New York Times
20 Nov 1987
p. 14.
Variety
25 Nov 1987
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Atlantic Entertainment Group presents
A Kent Bateman production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
2d unit asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
1st cam asst, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Addl photog, 2d unit
Addl photog, 2d unit
Gaffer
Best boy
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Still photog
Cam equip provided by
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Set costumer
MUSIC
Orig score by
Mus ed
Mus supv
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Post prod sd facility
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main and end title des by
Main and end title des by
Titles and opt eff by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup asst
Wolf prosthetics
Wolf prosthetics
Wolf makeup
Wolf makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Atlantic prod exec
Boxing coach
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Prod auditor
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Prod secy
Prod secy
Scr supv
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Asst to Christopher Leitch
Asst to Kent Bateman
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
First aid
Craft service
Craft service
Extras casting by
Extras casting by
Caterer
Fire safety officer
Fire safety officer
Animals provided by
Animals provided by
Geronimo slide provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Joseph Loeb III & Matthew Weisman
SONGS
“Deceiver,” written by Ken Noble, performed by The Beat Farmers, courtesy of MCA/Curb Records
“Do You Love Me?” written by Barry Gordy, performed by Ragtime, courtesy of Curb Records
“Who Do You Want To Be Today?” written by Danny Elfman, performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of A & M Records
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SONGS
“Deceiver,” written by Ken Noble, performed by The Beat Farmers, courtesy of MCA/Curb Records
“Do You Love Me?” written by Barry Gordy, performed by Ragtime, courtesy of Curb Records
“Who Do You Want To Be Today?” written by Danny Elfman, performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of A & M Records
“Outrageous,” written by Danny Elfman, performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of MCA Records
“One Step Forward,” written by Chris Hillman and Bill Wildes, performed by The Desert Rose Band, featuring Chris Hillman, John Jorgenson, and Herb Pederson, courtesy of MCA/Curb Records
“Party Lights,” written by Morris “Butch” Stewart, performed by Butch Stewart and the Keepers, courtesy of Curb Records
“Send Me an Angel,” written by David Sterry and Richard Zatorski, performed by Real Life, courtesy of MCA/Curb Records
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DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
20 November 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 20 November 1987
Production Date:
began 1 June 1987
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28656
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Freshman student Todd Howard earns a full athletic scholarship to Hamilton University even though the only thing he has ever done on an athletic field is perform in his high school marching band. Coach Billy Finstock, the college’s boxing coach, recommended him for the scholarship because he is the first cousin of Scott Howard, who was Finstock’s star basketball player at his old job at Beacontown High School. Some of the men in the Howard family can turn into werewolves at will, which is how Scott Howard became a basketball star. Finstock assumes Todd has the same ability. However, as Todd’s Uncle Harold, Scott’s father, helps him move into his dormitory, Todd assures him that the werewolf condition skipped his branch of the family. Todd, who wants to be a veterinarian, discovers his roommate is Rupert "Stiles" Stilinski, who was Scott’s best friend. Stiles arranged for them to be roommates so they could have a year of werewolf partying, but Todd insists he does not have “the family problem.” However, as Todd experiences frustrations adjusting to college life, his werewolf condition starts to emerge. While trying to change his schedule to add science classes, Todd’s eyes turn red and begin glowing when the registrar does not immediately grant his request. Similarly, when he and another student grab for the same book at the library, his eyes again begin glowing red. When Dean Dunn, who was skeptical about granting Todd the athletic scholarship, comes to wrestling practice and observes that Todd is not doing well, he reminds Coach Finstock that he expects a winning team this season. When Todd asks classmate Nicki to be his laboratory partner in biology class, ... +


Freshman student Todd Howard earns a full athletic scholarship to Hamilton University even though the only thing he has ever done on an athletic field is perform in his high school marching band. Coach Billy Finstock, the college’s boxing coach, recommended him for the scholarship because he is the first cousin of Scott Howard, who was Finstock’s star basketball player at his old job at Beacontown High School. Some of the men in the Howard family can turn into werewolves at will, which is how Scott Howard became a basketball star. Finstock assumes Todd has the same ability. However, as Todd’s Uncle Harold, Scott’s father, helps him move into his dormitory, Todd assures him that the werewolf condition skipped his branch of the family. Todd, who wants to be a veterinarian, discovers his roommate is Rupert "Stiles" Stilinski, who was Scott’s best friend. Stiles arranged for them to be roommates so they could have a year of werewolf partying, but Todd insists he does not have “the family problem.” However, as Todd experiences frustrations adjusting to college life, his werewolf condition starts to emerge. While trying to change his schedule to add science classes, Todd’s eyes turn red and begin glowing when the registrar does not immediately grant his request. Similarly, when he and another student grab for the same book at the library, his eyes again begin glowing red. When Dean Dunn, who was skeptical about granting Todd the athletic scholarship, comes to wrestling practice and observes that Todd is not doing well, he reminds Coach Finstock that he expects a winning team this season. When Todd asks classmate Nicki to be his laboratory partner in biology class, she thinks he is asking her on a date. Todd suggests they can do that too. At a school party, when Todd wants to dance with Nicki, Dean Dunn makes him dance with another girl. As they dance, Todd notices his fingernails getting thicker and the hair on his body growing. Soon his face is bulging and his canine teeth are growing and Todd turns into a werewolf. Todd dashes out of the dance and soon turns back into himself, but people in his dorm tease him by putting up a sign saying “No Animals Allowed,” and leaving a bowl of dogfood outside his door. Dean Dunn chastises Todd for putting on a dog costume and scaring the people at the dance, while Nicki, who is not frightened of the werewolf side of him, finds what is happening to him “biologically fascinating.” During a boxing match, Todd is knocked out, but before the referee finishes the count, he regains consciousness, gets up and turns into the werewolf. He knocks his opponent out easily and the team celebrates the victory by hoisting the “Werewolf Todd” on their shoulders. The campus goes wild for “The Wolf,” as they call him. Todd walks across campus as the werewolf rather than the human, and even goes to class as Werewolf Todd. Todd’s roommate, Stiles, starts selling werewolf merchandise and students clamor for Todd’s autograph. People cheer Werewolf Todd as he walks by and many women throw themselves at him. During boxing practice, Werewolf Todd is aggressive and he wins his matches. Dean Dunn, delighted to have a winning player, rewards Werewolf Todd with keys to a Corvette sports car. Todd misses many classes because of all the attention and parties. Nicki tries to tell him that people like Werewolf Todd, not Todd, but he dismisses the notion. When his biology professor, Tania Brooks, chastises him for not putting his full effort into her class, Todd replies he no longer believes he needs biology given the path he has chosen. Professor Brooks reminds him that he has a responsibility to use the gifts he has been given wisely. As final exams approach, Todd returns to his dorm room and wants to party, but Stiles and their friend, “Chubby,” have to study. Stiles tells Todd that no one wanted him to discover his werewolf abilities more than he did, but now that he has become “The Wolf,” he has also become a jerk. Upset, Todd goes to his Uncle Harold, saying he let things get out of hand as Werewolf Todd and that he plans to compete in the boxing finals as Todd. Uncle Harold believes there is still a good person inside him and offers some boxing tips. Todd also apologizes to Nicki, telling her he mistreated someone he loves. Todd misses his final biology exam, but Professor Brooks agrees to let him take a make-up exam. Nicki helps him study all night and Todd passes the exam. At the boxing finals, Todd is scheduled to play against three-time state champion Steve “Gus” Gustavson. When Todd shows up at the match as Todd rather than Werewolf Todd, people begin to worry. Dean Dunn orders him to fight as “The Wolf” or his scholarship is revoked. Todd gives Dunn back the car keys and tells him that this will be his last fight. Professor Tania Brooks overhears this exchange and threatens Dean Dunn, saying that Todd has a future at the school and it is not in the boxing ring. To make her point, Brooks’ eyes begin to glow red and a tail appears under her dress, indicating she too has the werewolf ability. Gus throws Todd around the ring during the first round and Todd does little to fight back. During the break, Stiles begs Todd to turn into the werewolf, but he refuses. During the second round, Gus hits Todd repeatedly. During the third round, Gus sends Todd to the mat, but as the referee gives the ten count, Todd’s eyes start to glow red, and he is about to transform into the werewolf. Then he sees Nicki in the audience, mouthing the words, “I love you.” He gets back up as Todd. He punches Gus and knocks him out, winning the match.



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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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