Cujo (1983)

R | 94 mins | Horror | 12 August 1983

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HISTORY

Credits for this unviewed film come from an official studio credit list in AMPAS library files. The summary is derived from various reviews, particularly Bill Krohn's in the Oct 1983 Box, and may not reflect what appears on screen.
       The 29 Oct 1982 DV carried an item announcing that Lewis Teague replaced Peter Medak as director of the film on 7 Oct 1982. The article also noted that Jan De Bont had replaced Tony Richmond as cinematographer.
       According to an article by Michael London in the 19 Aug 1983 LAT, the character of "Cujo" was assumed by four real St. Bernard dogs, several mechanical dogs, and a black Labrador-Great Dane mix attired in a St. Bernard costume. The Hollywood office of the American Humane Association observed the animal action and gave animal trainer Karl Miller and the movie's producers "high marks for safety."
       An article by Steven Ginsberg in the 7 Mar 1983 DV reported that Taft Entertainment Company hoped to release four films during the year, each marketed separately to potential distributors. The article noted that Cujo cost $6 million and was being marketed in foreign territories by Producers Sales Organization (PSO). It was expected that the first answer print of the film would be ready in Jun 1983. The 26 Apr 1983 HR announced that Warner Bros. had acquired domestic distribution rights to the film.
       According to the Oct 1983 Box, the film "opened extremely well," with a $6.1 million box-office gross in 1,239 theaters during its opening ... More Less

Credits for this unviewed film come from an official studio credit list in AMPAS library files. The summary is derived from various reviews, particularly Bill Krohn's in the Oct 1983 Box, and may not reflect what appears on screen.
       The 29 Oct 1982 DV carried an item announcing that Lewis Teague replaced Peter Medak as director of the film on 7 Oct 1982. The article also noted that Jan De Bont had replaced Tony Richmond as cinematographer.
       According to an article by Michael London in the 19 Aug 1983 LAT, the character of "Cujo" was assumed by four real St. Bernard dogs, several mechanical dogs, and a black Labrador-Great Dane mix attired in a St. Bernard costume. The Hollywood office of the American Humane Association observed the animal action and gave animal trainer Karl Miller and the movie's producers "high marks for safety."
       An article by Steven Ginsberg in the 7 Mar 1983 DV reported that Taft Entertainment Company hoped to release four films during the year, each marketed separately to potential distributors. The article noted that Cujo cost $6 million and was being marketed in foreign territories by Producers Sales Organization (PSO). It was expected that the first answer print of the film would be ready in Jun 1983. The 26 Apr 1983 HR announced that Warner Bros. had acquired domestic distribution rights to the film.
       According to the Oct 1983 Box, the film "opened extremely well," with a $6.1 million box-office gross in 1,239 theaters during its opening weekend.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Oct 1983.
---
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1982.
---
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1983
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1983
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
19 Aug 1983.
---
New York Times
13 Aug 1983
p. 13.
Variety
17 Aug 1983
p. 83.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Taft Entertainment Company Presents
A Daniel H. Blatt & Robert Singer Production
Distributed by Warner Bros.®
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Exec prod mgr
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Still photog
Still photog
Best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Ultracam 35 Cameras by
Cameras
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set painter
Set des
Construction coord
Carpenter
Prop master
Asst propman
Laborer
Laborer
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst costumer
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus ed
for La Da Productions
Mus supv by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff asst
Visual eff asst
Visual eff asst
Spec eff
Asst spec eff
Titles and opticals by
Main title graphic
MAKEUP
Special vis eff makeup by
Makeup artist
Asst special makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Animal action by
Prod assoc
Prod coord
First aid
Animal handler
Animal handler
Craft service
Welfare worker
Loc auditor
Asst accountant
Accounting secretary
Loc mgr
Generator op
Transportation coord
Asst coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Extra casting by
Asst cook
Asst cook
Unit pub
Spec consultant
Prod supv
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Cujo by Stephen King (Viking Press, New York, 1981).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 August 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 12 August 1983
New York opening: week of 13 August 1983
Production Date:
6 October 1982
Copyright Claimant:
Sunn Classic Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 October 1983
Copyright Number:
PA192729
Physical Properties:
Sound
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Cujo, a St. Bernard dog owned by the Camber family, is bitten by a rabid bat, and becomes vicious as he succumbs to the deadly disease. Charity Camber is tired of being physically abused by her husband, Joe, and after winning the lottery, she decides to leave and start a new life with her son, Brett. Elsewhere, Donna Trenton is having an affair with Steve Kemp, a resident of the resort town she is visiting with her young son, Danny Trenton. Her husband, Vic Trenton, ignores the infidelity and returns to the city to attend to his faltering business. Donna ends the affair, but Steve is unwilling to let go. When Donna and Tad drive to the Camber home, they are attacked by the rabid Cujo, and are forced to take refuge in their car for two days. When they fail to answer his telephone calls, Vic returns to the family vacation home to find it ransacked by Steve, leading Sheriff Bannerman to believe that Steve kidnapped Donna and Tad. The sheriff searches for them at the Camber home and is killed by Cujo. After Tad slips into a coma, Donna sneaks out of the car and tries to beat the dog to death with a baseball bat. Cujo revives as Donna carries Tad to the house, and she shoots him with the sheriff's handgun. Vic Trenton arrives soon after and is reunited with his ... +


Cujo, a St. Bernard dog owned by the Camber family, is bitten by a rabid bat, and becomes vicious as he succumbs to the deadly disease. Charity Camber is tired of being physically abused by her husband, Joe, and after winning the lottery, she decides to leave and start a new life with her son, Brett. Elsewhere, Donna Trenton is having an affair with Steve Kemp, a resident of the resort town she is visiting with her young son, Danny Trenton. Her husband, Vic Trenton, ignores the infidelity and returns to the city to attend to his faltering business. Donna ends the affair, but Steve is unwilling to let go. When Donna and Tad drive to the Camber home, they are attacked by the rabid Cujo, and are forced to take refuge in their car for two days. When they fail to answer his telephone calls, Vic returns to the family vacation home to find it ransacked by Steve, leading Sheriff Bannerman to believe that Steve kidnapped Donna and Tad. The sheriff searches for them at the Camber home and is killed by Cujo. After Tad slips into a coma, Donna sneaks out of the car and tries to beat the dog to death with a baseball bat. Cujo revives as Donna carries Tad to the house, and she shoots him with the sheriff's handgun. Vic Trenton arrives soon after and is reunited with his family. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Suspense


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.