Full page view
HISTORY

       A 12 Mar 1989 LAT item cited the production budget on Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure as $8.5 million. Principal photography was initially slated to begin Jan 1987 with production taking place in Rome, Italy, and at DEG Studios in Wilmington, NC, as noted in an 18 Nov 1986 DV casting announcement and 1 Dec 1986 DV production charts. The casting announcement noted the available parts of “Bill and Ted Cook,” the film’s “Caucasian, wide-eyed and innocent leads.” Shooting was moved to Arizona instead of Wilmington and delayed until 9 Feb 1987, according to undated HR production charts in AMPAS library files. Production notes stated that the bulk of principal photography took place in Phoenix, AZ, where locations included a “famous western town” in the desert and the Phoenix Metrocenter shopping mall. A futuristic dome was constructed at Phoenix’s Carefree Studios, where Clarence Clemons, Martha Davis, and Fee Waybill, the musicians portraying the “Three Most Important People in the World,” spent many “hours daily suspended from an elaborate system of pulleys and counterweights.” A “huge, sophisticated crane” was also constructed for the purpose of hoisting and lowering the time-traveling photo booth. After shooting ended in Phoenix, the company moved to Rome, Italy, for the final two weeks of the production.
       DEG was initially slated to release the film in Feb 1988, as noted in articles from the 17 Mar 1989 LA Weekly and 15 Apr 1988 HR. However, the company was nearing bankruptcy around the time Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure completed production, and was forced to sell all distribution rights ... More Less

       A 12 Mar 1989 LAT item cited the production budget on Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure as $8.5 million. Principal photography was initially slated to begin Jan 1987 with production taking place in Rome, Italy, and at DEG Studios in Wilmington, NC, as noted in an 18 Nov 1986 DV casting announcement and 1 Dec 1986 DV production charts. The casting announcement noted the available parts of “Bill and Ted Cook,” the film’s “Caucasian, wide-eyed and innocent leads.” Shooting was moved to Arizona instead of Wilmington and delayed until 9 Feb 1987, according to undated HR production charts in AMPAS library files. Production notes stated that the bulk of principal photography took place in Phoenix, AZ, where locations included a “famous western town” in the desert and the Phoenix Metrocenter shopping mall. A futuristic dome was constructed at Phoenix’s Carefree Studios, where Clarence Clemons, Martha Davis, and Fee Waybill, the musicians portraying the “Three Most Important People in the World,” spent many “hours daily suspended from an elaborate system of pulleys and counterweights.” A “huge, sophisticated crane” was also constructed for the purpose of hoisting and lowering the time-traveling photo booth. After shooting ended in Phoenix, the company moved to Rome, Italy, for the final two weeks of the production.
       DEG was initially slated to release the film in Feb 1988, as noted in articles from the 17 Mar 1989 LA Weekly and 15 Apr 1988 HR. However, the company was nearing bankruptcy around the time Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure completed production, and was forced to sell all distribution rights with the exception of television syndication for a rumored $1.5 million to Nelson Entertainment, a home video company which provided completion costs for the picture and organized additional editing and special effects work.
       The 15 Apr 1988 HR mentioned Alive and Columbia Pictures as possible theatrical distributors, based on existing relationships with Nelson Entertainment, but Orion Pictures Corporation eventually came on board to distribute. The movie opened nationwide in 1,190 theaters on 17 Feb 1989, a day that was declared “Be Excellent Day” by Los Angeles, CA, Mayor Tom Bradley in honor of the film. Critical reception was uniformly poor, but the picture proved to be a “sleeper hit,” as noted in several sources including the May 1989 Box review, which reported box-office earnings of $25.2 million after five weeks. The film ultimately grossed $39 million, as stated in a 5 Oct 1989 LAT brief, which also noted that the home video release was proving successful, with Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure recently moving into the fifth spot on Billboard magazine’s Top Five video rentals chart. A 12 Jul 1989 HR news brief stated that Nelson promoted the video release with a campaign costing over $2 million, including advertisements on over ten million boxes of Cheerios cereal and in 1.5 million DC comic books.
       A 12 Mar 1989 LAT item announced that a sequel was “in the works,” along with two possible television series, one live-action and one animated. The feature film sequel, Bill &Ted’s Bogus Journey (1991, see entry), was released a year and a half after the animated series, titled Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventures, which debuted fall 1990 on the CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) network, according to a 9 Sep 1990 Newsday article. Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter, and George Carlin reprised their roles as “Ted Logan,” “Bill S. Preston,” and “Rufus,” respectively, in both the sequel and the first of the animated show’s two seasons. Later, a live-action TV situation comedy, also titled Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventures, aired 28 Jun--20 Sep 1992 on the Fox network, with Evan Richards in the role of “Bill Preston, Esq.” and Christopher Kennedy playing “Ted Logan.”
       Fifteen years after the live-action show was cancelled, MGM announced a straight-to-DVD remake of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, to be written by Gabe Grifoni and Suzanne Francis, and produced by Frank Mancuso, Jr, as reported in an 11 Jul 2007 LAT brief. No further mention of the project, un-produced as of the writing of this Note, was found. The 11 Jul 2007 LAT also noted that writers Ed Solomon and Chris Matheson had attempted to make a third installment of the Bill & Ted’s series in the early 2000’s, revisiting the main characters as middle-aged men. However, despite initial interest from Winter and Reeves, Reeves’s manager reportedly advised against the actor’s involvement.
       According to a 7 Dec 1992 Var brief, DEG and Carolco Pictures (then-owner of DEG) were sued by Parafrance Communication, a French company which claimed to have bought rights to Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure as part of a $14.8 million purchase of DEG’s film library in 1990. The company later found out that Nelson Films Inc. owned the rights to the picture, while the rights to two other DEG films Parafrance had purchased, Darling (1965, see entry) and The Producers (1967, see entry), had also been sold to other entities. Parafrance sought at least $3 million in damages. The outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.

      The actor who plays “Abraham Lincoln” is credited as Robert Barron in opening credits and as Robert V. Barron in end credits. The following statements appear in end credits: “Scenes from ‘War and Peace’ courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation”; “The producers wish to thank: Raffaella De Laurentiis; Alan Riche; Norman Herman; Circle K Corporation; Arizona Motion Picture Development; The city of Phoenix Motion Picture Office; The mayor & city manager of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona; Coconino National Forest; America West Airlines; Nautilus Sports/Medical Industries, Inc. – Deland, Florida; Carefree Studio; Giada International Company S.r.l.; Goodwill Industries; Dr. George Carver, Arizona State University; Richard Beck & Jim Achtenhagen of Beck’s Guitars, Tempe, Arizona.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
May 1989.
---
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1986.
---
Daily Variety
1 Dec 1986.
---
Daily Variety
17 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1988
p. 1, 60.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 1989
p. 4, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1989.
---
LA Weekly
17 Mar 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1989
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
12 Mar 1989
Calendar, p. 36.
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1989
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jul 2007
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
17 Feb 1989
p. 12.
Newsday
9 Sep 1990
p. 10.
Variety
22 Feb 1989
p. 18, 435.
Variety
7 Dec 1992.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures Release
Nelson Entertainment Presents
An Interscope Communications Production
In association with Soisson/Murphey Productions
Presented in association with De Laurentiis Film Partners L.P.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Prod mgr, Italian crew
Unit mgr, Italian crew
1st asst dir, Italian crew
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d cam op
2d cam op
2d cam op
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Still photog
Lighting gaffer
Elec best boy
Elec
Key grip
Grip best boy
Cam op, Italian crew
1st asst cam, Italian crew
Lighting gaffer, Italian crew
Key grip, Italian crew
Still photog, Italian crew
Cam, Los Angeles crew
Still photog, Los Angeles crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Art dir, Italian crew
Prod des, Los Angeles crew
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Addl ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set const coord
Head carpenter
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
Plasterer
Scenic artist
Asst scenic artist
Asst painter
Asst painter
Asst painter
Set dec, Italian crew
Prop master, Italian crew
Set dec, Los Angeles crew
Lead person, Los Angeles crew
Swing gang, Los Angeles crew
Swing gang, Los Angeles crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward asst
Costumer, Italian crew
Ward master, Italian crew
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Scoring mixer
Asst to the comp
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Prod sd mixer, Italian crew
Sd mixer, Los Angeles crew
Boom op, Los Angeles crew
Supv sd ed
Gordon Ecker Productions
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Spec sd des
Sd fx res & des
Sd fx res & des
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Sd fx rec
Sd coord
ADR supv
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Machine room op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Visual eff & opticals by
Los Angeles
Eff prod mgr, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Supv, Miniature photog, Perpetual Motion Pictures,
Supv, Opt dept, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Supv, Matte dept, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Eff anim, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Miniature const, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Matte artist, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Prod asst, Perpetual Motion Pictures, Inc.
Admin asst, Perpetual Motion Picutres, Inc.
Software programmer
Software programmer
Software programmer
Software programmer
Motion control software
Spec eff lenses by
Computer-generated eff
Computer eff coord
Tech des
Mechanical eff by
Eff coord
Key tech
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Image coord
Image coord
Title seq des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup and hair
Hairdresser
Asst makeup/Hairdresser
Asst makeup/Hairdresser
Neanderthal makeup
Neanderthal makeup asst
Makeup & hair, Los Angeles crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Prod secy
Post prod supv
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Soisson/Murphey asst
Asst to Mr. Kroopf
Asst to Mr. Herek
L.A. prod secy
Loc mgr
Loc scout
Unit pub
Marketing consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Honeywagon driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Catering
Craft service
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
L.A. casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Prod medic
Card seq
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Prod coord, Italian crew
Prod auditor, Italian crew
Loc mgr, Los Angeles crew
Loc mgr, Los Angeles crew
Set nurse, Los Angeles crew
Voice casting
Insurance provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stunt coord, Italian crew
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Can't Break Away," written by Mitch Bottler and Gary Zekley, published by Colgems-EMI Music Inc. and Teenie Bopper Music, performed by Big Pig, produced by Nick Launay, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"In Time," written by Bob Marlette and Sue Shifrin, published by Golden Torch Music Corp./Dial M for Music and Intersong-USA, Inc./Palancar Music, performed by Robbie Robb, produced by Bob Marlette
"Dancing With A Gypsy," written by Anthony Corder, Keith Douglas, Patrick Francis and John Patterson, published by Corder Music and Ardent/Koala Music, performed by Tora Tora, produced by Joe Hardy and Paul Ebersold, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"I Can't Break Away," written by Mitch Bottler and Gary Zekley, published by Colgems-EMI Music Inc. and Teenie Bopper Music, performed by Big Pig, produced by Nick Launay, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"In Time," written by Bob Marlette and Sue Shifrin, published by Golden Torch Music Corp./Dial M for Music and Intersong-USA, Inc./Palancar Music, performed by Robbie Robb, produced by Bob Marlette
"Dancing With A Gypsy," written by Anthony Corder, Keith Douglas, Patrick Francis and John Patterson, published by Corder Music and Ardent/Koala Music, performed by Tora Tora, produced by Joe Hardy and Paul Ebersold, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Dangerous," written by Richard Czerny, Spencer Sercombe and Kevin Kreis, published by Irving Music, Inc. and DDL Music Show Publishing, performed by Shark Island, produced by Kevin Beamish, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"No Right To Do Me Wrong," written by Lee Ving, David Wills and Michael Ballew, published by Toxic Tunes, performed by Range War, produced by Lee Ving and Bill Horn
"Not So Far Away," written by Tom Cochrane, published by Falling Sky Music and Arista Music, Inc. (Administered by Arista Music, Inc.), performed by Glen Burtnick, produced by Glen Burtnick, courtesy fo A&M Records, Inc.
"The Boys And Girls Are Doing It," written by Frankie Miller and Jeff Barry, published by Rare Blue Music, Inc. (in the U.S. and Canada)/Chrysalis Music Ltd. and Steeplechase Music, performed by Vital Signs, produced by David Sieff, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Party Up," written by Michael Wells and Rori, published by Mykee Wells Music and Full Out Music, performed by Rori, produced by Rori and Michael Wells
"Walk Away," written by Brian Bricklin, Scott Bricklin, Jake Meyer, Ian Cross, James Goetz and Eddie Bader, published by Bricksongs, performed by Bricklin, produced by Bill Drescher, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Father Time," written by Richard Czerny and Spencer Sercombe, published by Irving Music, Inc. and Deliberate Music, performed by Shark Island, produced by Randy Nicklaus, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Play With Me," written by Nuno Bettencourt and Gary Cherone, published by Funky Metal Publishing (Administered by Almo Music Corp.), performed by Extreme, produced by Mack, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Bad Guitar," written and performed by Stevie "No Wonder" Salas
"Carlin's Solo," performed as the hands of Rufus, and written by Stevie Salas
"Two Heads Are Better Than One," written by Matthew Nelson, Gunnar Nelson and Dweezil Zappa, published by Matt Black Music, Gunster Music and Fighty-Bitey Music, performed by Power Tool, produced by David J. Holman, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 February 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 February 1989
Production Date:
began 9 February 1987 in Phoenix and Rome
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
89
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 2688 San Dimas, California, a man named Rufus describes his Utopian society, which owes its perfection to the two “Great Ones,” Bill S. Preston and Ted “Theodore” Logan, who lived seven hundred years before. Rufus recounts that he was once sent back in time to help Bill and Ted secure an idyllic future for San Dimas. Back in 1988, dimwitted teenagers Bill and Ted practice guitar in Bill’s garage and discuss the future of their band, Wyld Stallyns. At school, the boys’ History teacher, Mr. Ryan, warns that Bill and Ted will fail his class if they do not receive perfect scores on their oral report the next day. Re-reading their assignment, Bill tells Ted they must discuss how important historical figures would view modern-day San Dimas. After school, Ted goes home to retrieve his books for a joint study session. His father, Police Captain Logan, informs Ted that he will be sent to military school in Alaska if he does not pass Mr. Ryan’s class. Later, the boys study in the parking lot of a convenience store, where Rufus appears in a time-traveling telephone booth and offers to help with their report. The boys marvel at the arrival of a second telephone booth, carrying their doppelgangers, who inform Bill and Ted that they are about to have an “excellent adventure.” The doppelgangers announce that Bill and Ted must continue working on the history report, and urge them to say hello the princesses. Rufus ushers Bill and Ted into his booth and dials the pay phone, activating an antenna. On the way to 1805 Austria, Rufus explains they are traveling through the circuits of time via future technology. ... +


In 2688 San Dimas, California, a man named Rufus describes his Utopian society, which owes its perfection to the two “Great Ones,” Bill S. Preston and Ted “Theodore” Logan, who lived seven hundred years before. Rufus recounts that he was once sent back in time to help Bill and Ted secure an idyllic future for San Dimas. Back in 1988, dimwitted teenagers Bill and Ted practice guitar in Bill’s garage and discuss the future of their band, Wyld Stallyns. At school, the boys’ History teacher, Mr. Ryan, warns that Bill and Ted will fail his class if they do not receive perfect scores on their oral report the next day. Re-reading their assignment, Bill tells Ted they must discuss how important historical figures would view modern-day San Dimas. After school, Ted goes home to retrieve his books for a joint study session. His father, Police Captain Logan, informs Ted that he will be sent to military school in Alaska if he does not pass Mr. Ryan’s class. Later, the boys study in the parking lot of a convenience store, where Rufus appears in a time-traveling telephone booth and offers to help with their report. The boys marvel at the arrival of a second telephone booth, carrying their doppelgangers, who inform Bill and Ted that they are about to have an “excellent adventure.” The doppelgangers announce that Bill and Ted must continue working on the history report, and urge them to say hello the princesses. Rufus ushers Bill and Ted into his booth and dials the pay phone, activating an antenna. On the way to 1805 Austria, Rufus explains they are traveling through the circuits of time via future technology. The three arrive just after Napoleon Bonaparte’s army has invaded Austria. They are only there momentarily, however, before Rufus insists they must go. Just as the booth begins to dematerialize, Napoleon is sent flying by an explosion and gets sucked into the time machine’s wake. Arriving back in Ted’s front yard, Rufus instructs the boys to use the phone book, Circuits of Time, to navigate time travel on their own. He warns that wherever they go, time will pass normally in the present, and they must deliver their report on time, or else. As Rufus disappears, an empty phone booth materializes. As the boys contemplate what to do next, Napoleon falls out of a tree, and Bill suggests they collect other historical figures to use in their report. The boys leave Napoleon in the care of Ted’s little brother, Deacon, before heading back outside. On the way out, Ted is stopped by Mr. Logan, who accuses his son of misplacing a set of keys and informs him he will be sent to military school the following night. Bill calls Mr. Logan from the pay phone and impersonates a police officer, luring him to the police station so the boys can escape. As they travel through time, their first stop is the Old West, where they find Billy the Kid in 1879 New Mexico. After the Kid incites a barroom brawl, Bill and Ted help him escape an angry mob via the phone booth. The three travel back to 410 B.C., arriving in ancient Greece to find Socrates lecturing on the transient nature of human existence. Mispronouncing his name as “So-crates,” Ted uses rudimentary sign language to communicate with the philosopher and ushers him into the phone booth. Next, they go to Medieval England, where Bill and Ted meet the beautiful princesses their doppelgangers mentioned. Although they try to help the girls dodge arranged marriages, their father, the evil duke, discovers Bill and Ted and orders them executed. Just as the boys are about to be beheaded, the executioners reveal themselves to be Billy the Kid and Socrates. The four narrowly escape the evil duke’s guards, accidentally traveling to future San Dimas, where they meet Rufus’s leaders, “The Most Important People in the World.” Bill and Ted learn that they are worshipped in the future, and offer their followers two bits of wisdom: “Be excellent to each other,” and “Party on, dudes.” Meanwhile, in the present, Deacon and his friends take Napoleon for ice cream, then bowling. Deacon becomes frustrated with Napoleon’s bad attitude at the bowling alley and abandons him there. As their time machine begins to malfunction, Bill and Ted make several more stops, collecting Sigmund Freud, Ludwig van Beethoven, Joan of Arc, Genghis Khan, and Abraham Lincoln. Finally, the group arrives in prehistoric San Dimas, and Bill fixes the antenna on the phone booth with a wad of chewing gum. Arriving back in the present, Bill and Ted take the historical figures to the San Dimas mall to introduce them to the modern world. Leaving the group to their own devices, the boys go to Deacon’s baseball game to retrieve Napoleon, but when they realize he has gone missing, they panic. Assuming he went to the Waterloo amusement park, they find him there and drag him away. Meanwhile, as Mr. Ryan’s other students deliver their oral reports to a packed auditorium, Genghis Khan terrorizes a sporting goods store with a bat, Joan of Arc commandeers an aerobics class, and Beethoven plays a set of keyboards to a rapt audience. Mall cops arrest all of the historical figures and take them to the police station, where Mr. Logan orders them locked up. Bill’s young, attractive stepmother, Missy, drives Bill, Ted, and Napoleon to the police station, where Bill and Ted orchestrate a jailbreak with the help of their doppelgangers, who left Mr. Logan’s missing set of keys behind. They arrive at school just in time. The lights lower as Billy the Kid introduces Bill and Ted, instructing the audience to applaud. Mr. Logan and Mr. Preston argue, each blaming the other’s son for being a bad influence, while Freud onstage demonstrates psychoanalysis by analyzing Ted’s conflicted relationship with his father. Genghis Khan and Joan of Arc show off their fighting skills, and Abraham Lincoln gives a speech in which he urges students to “be excellent to each other” and “party on.” Bill and Ted add commentary about the historical figures’ impressions of modern-day San Dimas before joining them in the phone booth and disappearing back in time. Sometime later, as Bill and Ted practice guitar in Bill’s garage, Ted laments that nothing much has changed in their lives since the excellent adventure. They are interrupted by Rufus, who arrives with the two princesses from Medieval England in tow to congratulate them on passing History class. Rufus asks Bill and Ted to sign a Wyld Stallyns album cover for his children, explaining that their band’s music will eventually end war and poverty and become the foundation of a more peaceful society. He remarks that the princesses are in the band as well, and asks to play some music with the foursome. The amateur band sounds horribly out of tune, and Rufus comments that, in time, they do get better. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.