Cookie (1989)

R | 93 mins | Comedy | 23 August 1989

Director:

Susan Seidelman

Producer:

Laurence Mark

Cinematographer:

Oliver Stapleton

Production Designer:

Michael Haller

Production Company:

Lorimar Film Entertainment
Full page view
HISTORY

Actor-singer Eddie Fisher and his daughter Tricia Leigh Fisher were considered for the roles of “Arnold Ross,” and “Cookie,” according to a 21 Nov 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram. However, the roles went to Jerry Lewis and Emily Lloyd.
       A 7 Jan 1988 DV news brief reported that principal photography began that day in New York City. Filming was completed 15 Apr 1988 according to a news item in the 3 May 1988 DV.
       An 11 Mar 1988 ^NYT article reported that the movie was filmed entirely in New York City. Locations included: Little Italy, Chinatown, Coney Island, Elmont, Queens, the garment district, and the Manhattan Supreme Court courthouse.
       Actress Emily Lloyd, who is English, lived with an Italian-American family in Brooklyn, NY, for two weeks to acquire her New York accent, as stated in an 8 Aug 1988 People brief.
       The following written statements appears in end credits: “The Producers wish to thank: The New York City Mayor’s Office for Film, Theater & Broadcasting; Sing Sing Correctional Facility; NBA Entertainment, Inc., Senior Court Officers of New York State, Supreme Court at 60 Centre Street; Brighton Realty, Atlantic City, New Jersey, Call Associates, New Jersey; Bounty Trading Corporation; Martin Schnell & 20th Century Drapery; Neiman Marcus; Eric Weissman,” and “New York News Masthead used with permission of New York News, Inc.” ... More Less

Actor-singer Eddie Fisher and his daughter Tricia Leigh Fisher were considered for the roles of “Arnold Ross,” and “Cookie,” according to a 21 Nov 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram. However, the roles went to Jerry Lewis and Emily Lloyd.
       A 7 Jan 1988 DV news brief reported that principal photography began that day in New York City. Filming was completed 15 Apr 1988 according to a news item in the 3 May 1988 DV.
       An 11 Mar 1988 ^NYT article reported that the movie was filmed entirely in New York City. Locations included: Little Italy, Chinatown, Coney Island, Elmont, Queens, the garment district, and the Manhattan Supreme Court courthouse.
       Actress Emily Lloyd, who is English, lived with an Italian-American family in Brooklyn, NY, for two weeks to acquire her New York accent, as stated in an 8 Aug 1988 People brief.
       The following written statements appears in end credits: “The Producers wish to thank: The New York City Mayor’s Office for Film, Theater & Broadcasting; Sing Sing Correctional Facility; NBA Entertainment, Inc., Senior Court Officers of New York State, Supreme Court at 60 Centre Street; Brighton Realty, Atlantic City, New Jersey, Call Associates, New Jersey; Bounty Trading Corporation; Martin Schnell & 20th Century Drapery; Neiman Marcus; Eric Weissman,” and “New York News Masthead used with permission of New York News, Inc.”

More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1988.
---
Daily Variety
3 May 1988.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
21 Nov 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1989
p. 1.
New York Times
11 May 1988.
---
New York Times
23 Aug 1989
p. 13.
People
8 Aug 1988.
---
Variety
23 Aug 1989
p. 29.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Thomas Quinn
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Lorimar Film Entertainment presents
A Laurence Mark Production
A Susan Seidelman Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Video playback
Steadicam op
Still photog
Cam trainee
Cam trainee
Key grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Dolly grip
Grip
Loc lighting equip by
Loc grip equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative matching by
Post prod facilities by
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Props
Asst prop
Set dec
Scenic chargeman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Scenic standby
Scenic artist
Head carpenter
Head const grip
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Men's ward supv
Women's ward supv
Dog clothing des by
Dog clothing des by, Bark Avenue, Ltd.
MUSIC
Mus rec eng
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Aprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Post prod facilities by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Sepc eff coord
Main and end titles and opt eff by
DANCE
Dance consultant
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc mgr
Los asst
Los asst
Prod coord
Scr supv
Extras casting
Extras casting assoc
Dial coach
Asst to the prod
Asst to Susan Seidelman
Asst to Susan Seidelman
Asst to Mr. Falk
Prod secy
Casting asst
Casting intern
Unit pub
Teamster capt
Teamster co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Parking coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Animal trainer
Craft services
Craft services
Craft services
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Apprentice ed
Montage picture processor supplied by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Vesti La Giubba,” performed by Mario Del Monaco, courtesy of London Records (A Division of PolyGram Classics, Inc.)
“Americanos,” written and performed by Holly Johnson, ©1988 Holly Johnson Music, all rights reserved, Courtesy of UNI Records
“Love Is A Many Splendid Thing,” performed by The Four Aces, written by Paul Francis Webster & Sammy Fain, SBK Miller Catalog Inc., all rights reserved, courtesy of MCA Records
+
SONGS
“Vesti La Giubba,” performed by Mario Del Monaco, courtesy of London Records (A Division of PolyGram Classics, Inc.)
“Americanos,” written and performed by Holly Johnson, ©1988 Holly Johnson Music, all rights reserved, Courtesy of UNI Records
“Love Is A Many Splendid Thing,” performed by The Four Aces, written by Paul Francis Webster & Sammy Fain, SBK Miller Catalog Inc., all rights reserved, courtesy of MCA Records
“Cherry Pink And Apple Blossom White,” performed by Perez Prado, written by Jacques Larue, Mark David & Louiguy, ©1951, Renewed 1979 Chappell & Co., all rights reserved, courtesy of RCA Records
“The Brady Bunch Theme,” (Courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corp.), written by Frank Devol & Sherwood Schwartz, ©1969 Addax Music Co., Inc., all rights reserved
“Tarentella Brillante,” performed by Angelo & His Orchestra, courtesy of Fiesta Record Company, Inc., “Jingle Bell Rock,” performed by Bobby Helms, written by Joe Beal & Jim Boothe, ©1957 Intersong-U. S. A., all rights reserved, courtesy of MCA Records
“Hard Work,” performed by CCP, written by David Palmer, Chris Hubert & Peter Chapman, ©1988 Fiction Songs Ltd., all rights reserved, courtesy of UNI Records
”Can’t Get Enough Of Your Love, Babe,” written and performed by Barry White, Savette Music, Unichappel Music Inc., a/c Six Continents Music, all rights reserved, courtesy of PolyGram Special Projects, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
“Revolution Baby,” performed by Transvision Vamp, written by Nicholas Christian Sayer, ©1987 Cinepop Music, all rights reserved, courtesy of UNI Records
“Crash,” performed by The Primitives, written by P. J. Court, S. Dillighan & Tracey, ©1988 Complete Music Ltd., all rights reserved, courtesy of RCA Records
“Save Your Love,” performed by Jet Vegas, written by Michael Duignan & Ralph Sainte-Rose, ©1987 PolyGram Music Publishing Ltd., all rights reserved, courtesy of UNI Records
“Never Mind,” performed by Nanci Griffith, written by Harlan Howard, ©1986 Tree Publishing Company, Inc., International Copyright Secured, all rights reserved, courtesy of MCA Records
“Jay Dee’s Boogie Woogie,” performed by Jimmy Dorsey & His Orchestra, written by Jimmy Dorsey & Marvin Wright, ©1945, renewed 1973 Music Sales Corp., all rights reserved, courtesy of Fraternity Records
“I Should Be So Lucky,” performed by Kylie Minogue, written and produced by Stack Aitken Waterman, ©1987 All Boys Ltd., ©1988 All Boys U. S. A. Music, all rights reserved, courtesy of Geffen Records by arrangement with Warner Special projects
“Never Had It So Good,” performed by Tommy Page, written by Tommy Page & Alexandra Forbes, ©1989 Warner-Tamerlane o/b/o/Itself, Doraflow Music Company, Inc., Page Three Music and Platinum Plateau, all rights reserved, courtesy of Sire Record Company.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 August 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 August 1989
Production Date:
7 January 1988--15 April 1988.
Copyright Claimant:
Lorimar Film Entertainment Company
Copyright Date:
6 March 1990
Copyright Number:
PA460510
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses & Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29267
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, Carmela “Cookie” Voltecki is arrested for jumping over a subway turnstile without paying. She is bailed out of jail by attorney Henry Solomon, who assigns two henchmen to drive her to prison, where her father, Dominick “Dino” Capisco, in incarcerated. Fearing Cookie’s behavior will ruin his chances for parole, Dino orders her to get a job and stop upsetting her mother by staying out all night. Cookie returns home, declaring her gratitude that Dino never divorced his wife to marry her mother, Lenore, who responds with tears. Hoping to calm Lenore, Cookie agrees to work for Dino’s former partner, Carmine Tarantino, sewing labels on counterfeit blue jeans. Over the protests of Federal prosecutor Richie Segretto, Dino is paroled. He takes Lenore to Atlantic City, New Jersey, where they encounter land developer Arnold Ross. Dino demands payment for illegal services rendered, and Arnold claims he gave the money to Carmine years earlier. Lenore wants to marry Dino, but he is forced by his parole agreement to remain with his wife, Bunny. Later, Dino meets with Carmine and his son, Dominick Tarantino. Carmine corroborates Arnold’s story, but insists the money was lost in bad real estate investments. At Carmine’s Christmas party, Cookie receives unwanted attention from a young mobster named Vito. After she photographs crime lord Enzo Della Testa ordering Carmine to kill Dino, Vito snatches the camera and exposes the film. Although Cookie is angered at first, she and Vito spend much of the party exchanging flirtatious glances across the room. Dino continues to demand money from Carmine, whose refusals prompt him to storm out of the house. As Cookie drives Dino home, they notice a ... +


In New York City, Carmela “Cookie” Voltecki is arrested for jumping over a subway turnstile without paying. She is bailed out of jail by attorney Henry Solomon, who assigns two henchmen to drive her to prison, where her father, Dominick “Dino” Capisco, in incarcerated. Fearing Cookie’s behavior will ruin his chances for parole, Dino orders her to get a job and stop upsetting her mother by staying out all night. Cookie returns home, declaring her gratitude that Dino never divorced his wife to marry her mother, Lenore, who responds with tears. Hoping to calm Lenore, Cookie agrees to work for Dino’s former partner, Carmine Tarantino, sewing labels on counterfeit blue jeans. Over the protests of Federal prosecutor Richie Segretto, Dino is paroled. He takes Lenore to Atlantic City, New Jersey, where they encounter land developer Arnold Ross. Dino demands payment for illegal services rendered, and Arnold claims he gave the money to Carmine years earlier. Lenore wants to marry Dino, but he is forced by his parole agreement to remain with his wife, Bunny. Later, Dino meets with Carmine and his son, Dominick Tarantino. Carmine corroborates Arnold’s story, but insists the money was lost in bad real estate investments. At Carmine’s Christmas party, Cookie receives unwanted attention from a young mobster named Vito. After she photographs crime lord Enzo Della Testa ordering Carmine to kill Dino, Vito snatches the camera and exposes the film. Although Cookie is angered at first, she and Vito spend much of the party exchanging flirtatious glances across the room. Dino continues to demand money from Carmine, whose refusals prompt him to storm out of the house. As Cookie drives Dino home, they notice a pair federal agents in pursuit. Dino orders Cookie to evade them, and she makes a dramatic U-turn, forcing the agents off the road. However, the men take a photograph of Dino and Cookie, which Richie Segretto releases to the press. When Bunny sees the image the next day, Dino assures her that Cookie is merely his driver. The gangster is under constant surveillance by both Carmine and federal agents, and the news media proclaim Dino the new “Godfather.” Dino laughs at the exaggeration, believing Segretto has created the rumor to bolster his own reputation. Dino collects his debt from Carmine by robbing a shipment of furs and organizing a workers strike at the counterfeit jean factory. Later, Carmine’s men open fire on Dino’s car, but Cookie is able to out-maneuver the gangsters. Within moments, however, she and her father are arrested after colliding with a fire hydrant. Following their release, reporters demand a story, and Cookie describes Dino as a peace-loving man who only wants to grow tomatoes. Days later, Dino’s car explodes and he goes into hiding with Vito. Cookie makes a deal with Segretto, agreeing to testify against Carmine if her father is placed in protective custody. When Dino responds with skepticism, Cookie devises a plan to create the illusion that Dino is already dead. Dino agrees, but only if he can retrieve the money Carmine stole from him. Sometime later, Arnold Ross reports to Carmine and his boss, Enzo Della Testa, that Dino intends to launder $2 million prior to retiring in a foreign country. After the trio decides to rob and kill Dino, Carmine invites the gangster to Arnold’s Atlantic City hotel. Dino accepts, providing Cookie and Dominick Tarantino travel together, each carrying half of the $4 million Carmine owes him. Along the way, two henchmen disguised as motorcycle police rob Dominick and Cookie. Meanwhile, Segretto’s men tell Dino they have rigged his car with explosives, scheduled to detonate at 9:00 that evening, after which the press will be notified of the gangster’s purported demise. Dino’s plans change when Carmine telephones to say he is holding Cookie hostage. They arrange a meeting at 9:00, but when Carmine enters Dino’s limousine, he finds only a corpse inside. Before Carmine can react, the car explodes. The next morning Cookie demands that Segretto place Dino and Lenore in the witness protection program, in exchange for her silence concerning Carmine’s death. On the day Dino is “buried” in New York City, he marries Lenore in Minnesota. Cookie attends the funeral and holds hands with Vito. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.