Mausoleum (1983)

R | 98 mins | Horror | 29 April 1983

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HISTORY

End credits credits conclude with the following statement: "The producers wish to thank the following: D. Laurenti Promenade Mall, Woodland Hills, California; Saint Tropez West." Other acknowledgements are illegible on the viewed print.
       The 24 Feb 1981 HR announced that principal photography would begin that week, and a news item in the 2 Mar 1981 HR stated that a summer 1981 release was planned. On 5 Mar 1981, DV reported that Danny Jordan would be the film’s musical director and co-executive producer, but he is not credited onscreen in either capacity.
       Morton Green, who originally owned the rights to the story, alternately titled Mausoleum, The Demon of Hell, sued producers Jerry Zimmerman and Robert Barich for breach of contract and civil fraud, according to the 9 Apr 1981 DV. Green transferred the rights on 1 Jan 1981 to Western International Pictures, Inc. (WIP), comprised of Zimmerman and Barich, in exchange for “a chance to direct” and a salary of $60,000, but was fired in late Feb 1981. The suit included Green’s promised salary plus $1 million in punitive damages. Zimmerman and Barich were also arrested and charged with nine felony counts for “purchasing luggage and other items” from Los Angeles, CA, importers, “but not paying for them.” The charges included “grand theft and conspiracy to cheat and defraud.” Four other members of the alleged conspiracy were also charged. The outcome of these cases has not been determined.
       Another suit was filed, shortly after the film’s 29 Apr 1983 opening, by Michael Zide, who claimed ownership of “all domestic ancillary ... More Less

End credits credits conclude with the following statement: "The producers wish to thank the following: D. Laurenti Promenade Mall, Woodland Hills, California; Saint Tropez West." Other acknowledgements are illegible on the viewed print.
       The 24 Feb 1981 HR announced that principal photography would begin that week, and a news item in the 2 Mar 1981 HR stated that a summer 1981 release was planned. On 5 Mar 1981, DV reported that Danny Jordan would be the film’s musical director and co-executive producer, but he is not credited onscreen in either capacity.
       Morton Green, who originally owned the rights to the story, alternately titled Mausoleum, The Demon of Hell, sued producers Jerry Zimmerman and Robert Barich for breach of contract and civil fraud, according to the 9 Apr 1981 DV. Green transferred the rights on 1 Jan 1981 to Western International Pictures, Inc. (WIP), comprised of Zimmerman and Barich, in exchange for “a chance to direct” and a salary of $60,000, but was fired in late Feb 1981. The suit included Green’s promised salary plus $1 million in punitive damages. Zimmerman and Barich were also arrested and charged with nine felony counts for “purchasing luggage and other items” from Los Angeles, CA, importers, “but not paying for them.” The charges included “grand theft and conspiracy to cheat and defraud.” Four other members of the alleged conspiracy were also charged. The outcome of these cases has not been determined.
       Another suit was filed, shortly after the film’s 29 Apr 1983 opening, by Michael Zide, who claimed ownership of “all domestic ancillary rights” to Mausoleum. According to the suit, Zide’s company, Producers Service of Woodland Hills, was granted the rights after not receiving payment on a $30,000 loan, made to WIP in Jul 1982. Zide also alleged that another agreement with WIP entitled him to “15% of domestic theatrical film rentals and 10% of all advances and guarantees received by WIP, in exchange for plaintiff’s services as producers’ representative on the picture,” and that his signature was forged on a Nov 1982 document canceling the agreement. The plaintiff sued for an additional $10 million in punitive damages, and named Getty Film Laboratories, Goldfarb Distributors, and Motion Picture Marketing, the film’s Los Angeles distributor, as defendants, in addition to Barich and Zimmerman. The outcomes of the lawsuits have not been determined.
       Mausoleum opened to negative reviews. However, the Jul 1983 Box, which described the plot as “laughably bad,” reported that it earned $124,000 during its opening weekend at eighteen Los Angeles theaters. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jul 1983.
---
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1981.
---
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1981.
---
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1983
p. 9.
Daily Variety
13 May 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1983
p. 10.
Variety
15 Apr 1981.
---
Variety
11 May 1983
p. 26, 28.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Motion Picture Marketing Release
Western International Pictures Presents
a Robert Barich film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir/unit prod mgr
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story and scr by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Lighting des by
1st cam op
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Steadi cam op
Gaffer's best boy
Gaffer's best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Best boy
Still photog
Cam & lenses provided by
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Prop asst
Const
COSTUMES
Ward mistress
Ward asst
MUSIC
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Mechanical explosive spec eff & flying seq by
Spec eye lenses provided by
Eye tech
Main title des
Opt by
MAKEUP
Spec eff makeup created by
Spec eff makeup & makeup supv
Makeup
Makeup
Makeup
Ms. Bresee's makeup & hair des by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Prod coord
Prod assoc
Scr supv
Wrangler
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation asst
Transportation asst
Transportation asst
Honeywagon driver
Police security & permits
Police security & permits
Water permits
Maintenance
Catering
Prod accountant
Prod attorney
Prod insurance
Prod secy
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Double
Double
Double
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Free Again," music and lyrics by Frank Primato.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mausoleum, The Demon Of Hell
Release Date:
29 April 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 April 1983
Production Date:
began late February 1981
Copyright Claimant:
Western International Pictures
Copyright Date:
9 June 1983
Copyright Number:
PA177995
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
98
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Young Susan Walker attends her mother’s funeral with her aunt, Cora Nomed. However, Susan refuses to leave with Cora and runs back into the cemetery, where she discovers the Nomed mausoleum. As the gate springs open, she enters, finding herself surrounded by green fog and the sound of thunder. When a tramp wanders in behind her, Susan’s eyes turn luminous green and he staggers from the structure with smoke and flames emanating from his face. Susan kneels before the tomb and touches it, causing the lid to open and a claw-like hand to reach out. Twenty years later, psychiatrist Dr. Simon Andrews assures Cora that her ongoing concerns about Susan are unfounded. Cora counters by handing Simon her father’s history of the Nomed family, which describes a 300-year-old family curse. Simon dismisses the story as superstition, ignoring Cora’s insistence that she has witnessed similarly erratic behavior in both her late sister and her niece. Despite Simon’s skepticism, he reads the book, which explains how a demon “broke free of the crown of thorns” and now possesses the body of the firstborn daughter to each generation of Nomeds. It also states that the demon can only be cast out by reuniting it with the crown of thorns, which adorns the gate of the mausoleum. That evening, Susan’s husband, Oliver Farrell, awakens her from a nap and offers to take her dancing, as their gardener, Ben, watches with interest through a window. Shortly after arriving at the nightclub, Oliver is called back to his office, and the couple is followed to the exit by a drunken man, who is enamored ... +


Young Susan Walker attends her mother’s funeral with her aunt, Cora Nomed. However, Susan refuses to leave with Cora and runs back into the cemetery, where she discovers the Nomed mausoleum. As the gate springs open, she enters, finding herself surrounded by green fog and the sound of thunder. When a tramp wanders in behind her, Susan’s eyes turn luminous green and he staggers from the structure with smoke and flames emanating from his face. Susan kneels before the tomb and touches it, causing the lid to open and a claw-like hand to reach out. Twenty years later, psychiatrist Dr. Simon Andrews assures Cora that her ongoing concerns about Susan are unfounded. Cora counters by handing Simon her father’s history of the Nomed family, which describes a 300-year-old family curse. Simon dismisses the story as superstition, ignoring Cora’s insistence that she has witnessed similarly erratic behavior in both her late sister and her niece. Despite Simon’s skepticism, he reads the book, which explains how a demon “broke free of the crown of thorns” and now possesses the body of the firstborn daughter to each generation of Nomeds. It also states that the demon can only be cast out by reuniting it with the crown of thorns, which adorns the gate of the mausoleum. That evening, Susan’s husband, Oliver Farrell, awakens her from a nap and offers to take her dancing, as their gardener, Ben, watches with interest through a window. Shortly after arriving at the nightclub, Oliver is called back to his office, and the couple is followed to the exit by a drunken man, who is enamored by Susan. Offended by the man’s rudeness, Susan follows him with her glowing green eyes and causes his car to burst into flames once he is inside. Oliver tries to rescue the man, but is unable to open the car doors. Ben appears at the Farrell home the next day and flirts openly with Susan while her husband is at work. She responds in kind, and their ensuing sexual encounter concludes with Susan using a garden claw to kill and mutilate Ben. The following morning, Cora arrives at the house, asking for Susan’s signature on some estate papers. The demon overtakes Susan and wills Cora’s torso to split open. Oliver is unaware of his wife’s alter ego until later that night, when he awakens to find Susan asleep in a rocking chair, bearing the demon’s face. He telephones Simon, who maintains his skepticism and offers an appointment for the next day. Susan returns to normal, but Oliver is unable to sleep. In the morning, he asks Elsie, the maid, to look after Susan until he returns in the early afternoon. However, the green fog and pulsating light that surround Susan only encourage the maid to pack her suitcase and leave. Although Susan tells her husband that nothing is wrong, she keeps her appointment with Simon. The psychiatrist places her under hypnosis and records the session, during which the demon reveals itself. Afterward, Simon plays the tape for his colleague, Dr. Roni Logan, a specialist in the paranormal, who convinces him of Susan’s demonic possession. Meanwhile, Susan invites a delivery boy into her home with the promise of sex, but fractures his skull instead. The next day, Simon informs Oliver of Susan’s condition and instructs him to avoid close contact with her until the crown of thorns has been retrieved. That afternoon, Susan steals a painting from an art gallery, and when the salesman pursues her, she levitates him high above the floor, then allows him to drop onto a conical metal sculpture. Upon his return home, Oliver expresses dislike for the painting, which features a centaur and bare-breasted women. The tension between the couple continues through dinner, but Oliver later apologizes to Susan while she is taking a bubble bath, and she climbs from the tub to embrace him. A thunderstorm rages outside as Simon removes the crown of thorns from the mausoleum gate, and Susan tightens her embrace until it crushes Oliver’s body. Simon arrives to find Oliver dead in the bathtub and Susan playing with dolls in the attic. As Susan reminisces about her childhood, Simon places the crown of thorns on her head, removing the demon from her body and returning it to the cemetery. Simon and Susan arrive at the mausoleum, where they find the creature sprawled over the tomb. Susan places the crown on the demon’s head, and the tomb opens, trapping the monster inside as the sun rises outside. She emerges from the experience in a state of bewilderment, and Simon promises to explain everything over time. Before leaving, Simon tells the caretaker, “You’ve known this secret and lived with it, like your father before you and his father before him,” reminding him that no one is to enter the mausoleum. As Simon and Susan drive away, the caretaker reveals himself to be Ben, the gardener. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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