Never Say Never Again (1983)

PG | 134 mins | Drama, Adventure | 7 October 1983

Director:

Irvin Kershner

Producer:

Jack Schwartzman

Cinematographer:

Douglas Slocombe

Editor:

Ian Crafford

Production Designers:

Philip Harrison, Stephen Grimes

Production Company:

Taliafilm
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HISTORY

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, actor Sean Connery returned to playing “James Bond,” following a twelve-year hiatus, on the advice of his wife, Micheline Roquebrune, who also suggested the film’s title. Connery was involved in several aspects of the production, “from casting control to script approval.” The picture marked Connery’s second teaming with director Irvin Kershner. A news item in the 4 Dec 1982 Screen International reported that Connery was paid $3 million “against 15 percent of the gross.” On 16 Mar 1983, Var estimated the actor’s salary at $5 million, plus a percentage of receipts.
       A studio press release announced the 27 Sep 1982 start of principal photography in the South of France. The production team was based in the city of Nice, giving it access to other French Riviera locations, including the casino in Monte Carlo, Monaco, which supplied professional croupiers for the charity ball sequence. Villa Rothschild and Villefranche served as the seaside castle of “Maximilian Largo,” the latter of which was fitted with “gigantic walls and heavy portcullis” to resemble a fortress. Largo’s luxury yacht was the Nabila, a 285-foot-long “floating palace” owned by billionaire Adnan Khashoggi.
       In November 1982, after nearly two months in southern France, the production moved to Nassau in the Bahama Islands, where an underwater unit was preparing a sequence involving live tiger sharks and a sunken ship. The ship was an artificially aged cargo boat, placed one half mile offshore, fifty feet below the surface, and fifty feet from one of the world’s deepest ocean trenches. The ... More Less

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, actor Sean Connery returned to playing “James Bond,” following a twelve-year hiatus, on the advice of his wife, Micheline Roquebrune, who also suggested the film’s title. Connery was involved in several aspects of the production, “from casting control to script approval.” The picture marked Connery’s second teaming with director Irvin Kershner. A news item in the 4 Dec 1982 Screen International reported that Connery was paid $3 million “against 15 percent of the gross.” On 16 Mar 1983, Var estimated the actor’s salary at $5 million, plus a percentage of receipts.
       A studio press release announced the 27 Sep 1982 start of principal photography in the South of France. The production team was based in the city of Nice, giving it access to other French Riviera locations, including the casino in Monte Carlo, Monaco, which supplied professional croupiers for the charity ball sequence. Villa Rothschild and Villefranche served as the seaside castle of “Maximilian Largo,” the latter of which was fitted with “gigantic walls and heavy portcullis” to resemble a fortress. Largo’s luxury yacht was the Nabila, a 285-foot-long “floating palace” owned by billionaire Adnan Khashoggi.
       In November 1982, after nearly two months in southern France, the production moved to Nassau in the Bahama Islands, where an underwater unit was preparing a sequence involving live tiger sharks and a sunken ship. The ship was an artificially aged cargo boat, placed one half mile offshore, fifty feet below the surface, and fifty feet from one of the world’s deepest ocean trenches. The hazardous location, combined with the presence of live sharks, created a challenge for the actors, some of whom had no previous experience with SCUBA diving. Other locations included a jungle in central Nassau, which appeared in the opening sequence, the Nassau Beach Hotel, the British Colonial Hotel, and the southern Florida coast.
       The final stages of photography occurred at EMI Elstree Studios in Hertfordshire, England, where the underwater cavern and ancient temple sets were built. Locations included Waddesdon Manor and Luton Hoo, which provided the health resort sets. The production had the first computer department installed “on the studio floor,” to create screen graphics and visual effects. Responding to concerns about special effects overshadowing the cast, costume designer Charles Knode created attire that would highlight the characters’ personalities, such as a dress designed for actress Kim Basinger, made from a single piece of specially produced silk. The 8 Feb 1983 HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       As reported in the 1 Sep 1982 Var, the film was based in part on the Ian Fleming novel Thunderball, with additional material contributed by executive producer Kevin McClory, from a treatment he cowrote with Fleming years earlier. A letter in the 11 Sep 1982 Screen International from Anne Schwebel, assistant to producer Jack Schwartzman, corrected a story in the previous week’s issue, denying any connection with a screenplay titled Warhead.
       Never Say Never Again was scheduled to begin production at approximately the same time as Octopussy (1983, see entry), produced by Albert R. Broccoli, who had been involved with the “James Bond” franchise for more than twenty years. Broccoli did not control the rights to Thunderball, allowing Schwartzman to produce a remake. Schwartzman signed an agreement earlier in the year, granting foreign sales rights to Producers Sales Organization (PSO), which had already sold the film in much of Western Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, as noted in the 8 Sep 1982 Var. A studio press release, dated 26 Aug 1982, announced Warner Bros. Pictures as distributor for North America, the United Kingdom “and various other territories.”
       In the 31 Aug 1982 LAT, actress Barbara Carrera attributed her role in the film to a chance meeting with Irvin Kershner at the 1982 Philippines Film Festival. The 20 Oct 1982 Var noted that actor Bernie Casey was the first African American to play “Felix Leiter,” a recurring role in “James Bond” films.
       According to the 31 Mar 1983 HR, trustees of the Ian Fleming estate, with support from Octopussy distributor United Artists Corporation and Broccoli’s Danjaq S.A., sued to block the release of Never Say Never Again. A British high court dismissed the suit, as did a London, England, court of appeals. The 8 Jun 1983 HR reported that Kevin McClory threw a party to celebrate the decision, which allowed him the option to film ten additional treatments he co-authored with Fleming.
       Connery told the 14 Jun 1983 LAHExam that the completion of underwater photography was delayed by persistent bad weather, postponing the picture’s release until Oct 1983. As noted in the 15 Jun 1983 Var, the actor was in the Bahamas to shoot additional footage.
       The 6 Sep 1983 HR reported that film historian Steven Jay Rubin, in association with AMC Theatres, organized a “Sean is Back/007 Master Trivia Marathon,” scheduled for 8 Oct 1983 in La Puente, CA. Warner Bros. was not involved, due to contractual issues. A studio press release, dated 13 Sep 1983, announced the 6 Oct 1983 world premiere at Mann’s National Theater in Los Angeles, CA, with proceeds benefiting the Westside Community for Independent Living (WCIL). Sean Connery and Barbara Carrera were expected to attend. Never Say Never Again opened 7 Oct 1983 to positive reviews. According to a 17 Oct 1983 press release, the picture grossed $9,725,154 during its opening weekend, the largest for any “Bond” film to date, and $20,421,961 in its first ten days. On 24 Jan 1984, DV reported domestic receipts of $54,578,660, and predicted that it would be the highest-grossing release in the history of foreign distributor PSO.
       As stated in the 23 Dec 1983 LAT, England’s Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) urged a boycott of the picture because it contained a stunt in which a horse falls forty feet into the sea. The stunt, filmed in Spain, reportedly caused the horse “terror amounting to unnecessary suffering.” Warner Bros. argued that the horse had not been harmed, but complied with the society by removing one half-second of the sequence from British prints.
       The 18 Jan 1984 LAT confirmed that Connery would not reprise the “James Bond” character, following a disagreement with Schwartzman. At the time of the article, Schwartzman had only three weeks left to exercise his option to make another “Bond” picture, but was reportedly discouraged by the $5 million renewal fee, and news that Albert Broccoli was readying his next film in the series. However, Schwartzman was considering a deal with Broccoli, who had concerns about the option being available on the open market.
       The 18 Oct 1985 HR and 30 Oct 1985 Var reported that Connery filed a complaint against Schwartzman and his company, Taliafilm, claiming he had not received his agreed-upon percentage of profits. Taliafilm was also charged with granting three banks a security interest in the production without Connery’s permission. Although an arbitrator decided in favor of the actor, he demanded accounting, a minimum of $172,843 in damages, and $25 million in punitive damages. The outcome of the case has not been determined.
       Two months later, the 1 Jan 1986 Var reported Taliafilm’s lawsuit against director Irvin Kershner for failing to stay within the film’s budget. The complaint alleges Kershner “rewrote portions of the screenplay without approval, allowed the destruction of a set worth approximately $250,000 and delayed principal photography for five weeks,” inflating the $25,500,000 budget to $36 million. Taliafilm sought total damages of $65 million. The 31 Oct 1986 HR noted that the lawsuit was dismissed, and claims were settled. No further details were given.
       Schwartzman completed a deal for the picture’s release in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), as reported in the 2 Feb 1990 DV. Prior to that time, the Soviet government banned “James Bond” films because of their “highly militaristic and pro-Western” content. A nationwide summer release was planned, to be preceded by a gala premiere in Moscow, Russia, “attended by Schwartzman and others involved in the production.”
       The 4 Dec 1997 HR announced the film’s acquisition by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures (MGM), reinforcing the company’s “claim on the Bond legacy.” Schwartzman’s widow, actress Talia Shire, approved the sale. The producer died in 1994 of pancreatic cancer.
       The 8 Apr 2013 Hello (London) revealed that singer Bonnie Tyler was originally hired to perform the theme song, but declined after hearing it. She defended her decision, saying it was the only “Bond” theme that was not a hit.
       End credits include the following statements: “The generosity extended by the owner of the yacht Nabila has been acknowledged with a contribution by the producer to The Princess Grace Foundation for charity through the Khashoggi Foundation”; “Thanks ‘A. K.’”; “Furs & leathers especially designed for Barbara Carrera by Fendi”; “The producers wish to acknowledge the contributions made by: Aiwa Audio Cassette Recorder; Atari; British Caledonian Airways, London; Dacor; Hertz, France; Harvey; Morfax, London; Nippon Electric Company; Norank Engineering, London; Regie Renault, France; Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield, London; RCA Victor Company of Japan; Victor Company of Japan; JVC; Universal Gym Equipment; and Yamaha Motor Company, Ltd.”; “The producers wish to acknowledge with thanks the assistance of: Robert A. Shaheen; The Bahamas National Trust; The Sheraton British Colonial Hotel, Nassau; The Nassau Beach Hotel, Nassau; Silver Springs, Florida; Municipalite et Police de Villefranche Sur Mer; Societe des Bains de Mer – Monaco; Club de Vieux Manoir-Fort Carre D’Antibes; Fondation Rothschild – St. Jean Cap Ferrat; Chambre de Commerce Aeroport – Nice Cote D’Azur; Police Nationale; Gendarmerie Nationale; Police Monegasque”; “And the Municipalities of: Antibes; Beaulieu Sur Mer; Menton; Monte Carlo; Nice; Roquebrune-Cap Marin; Villefranche Sur Mer”; “All under sea sequences shown in this film were filmed in The Commonwealth of the Bahamas”; “Filmed on location in The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, France, Spain and the United Kingdom”; “Made at Thorn EMI Elstree Studios, Herts, England, by Woodcote Productions Limited.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Oct 1982.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jan 1984.
---
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1990.
---
Hello (London)
8 Apr 2013.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 1983
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1983
p. 3, 17.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1997.
---
LAHExam
28 Sep 1982.
---
LAHExam
30 May 1983
Section A, p. 2.
LAHExam
14 Jun 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Aug 1982
p. 1, 4.
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 1983
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
23 Dec 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jan 1984.
---
New York Times
7 Oct 1983
p. 13.
Screen International
11 Sep 1982.
---
Screen International
4 Dec 1982.
---
Variety
1 Sep 1982.
---
Variety
8 Sep 1982.
---
Variety
20 Oct 1982.
---
Variety
16 Mar 1983.
---
Variety
15 Jun 1983.
---
Variety
5 Oct 1983
p. 20.
Variety
12 Oct 1983
p. 53, 108.
Variety
30 Oct 1985.
---
Variety
1 Jan 1986.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Jack Scwartzman and Kevin McClory present
A Taliafilm Production
An Irvin Kershner Film
Taliafilm in association with Producers Sales Organization
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Underwater seq dir by
1st asst dir
Prod mgr (U.K.)
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Prod mgr Bahamas
Prod mgr France
Prod mgr Spain
Prod mgr Spain
2d asst dir, 2d unit
3rd asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
Aerial photog
Cam op
Cam op
Focus puller
Focus puller
Dir of photog for underwater seq
Underwater cam op
Underwater cam op
Underwater gaffer
Stills photog
Cam grip
Elec gaffer
Best boy
Opt chief cam op
Lighting equip supplied by
Clapper/Loader
2d cam op, 2d unit
2d cam focus puller, 2d unit
Clapper/Loader, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Chief elec, 2d unit
Practical elec
Elec
Elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod des
Supv art dir
Art dir
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Draughtsman
Draughtsman
Sketch artist
Sketch artist
Sketch artist
Art dept trainee
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
Addl ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const mgr
Prop buyer
Standby crew
Standby crew
Standby crew
Standby crew
Standby crew
Standby crew
Supv c/hand propman
C/hand propman (Bahamas)
C/hand propman
Prop storeman
Propman
Standby carpenter, 2d unit
Standby stagehand, 2d unit
Standby rigger, 2d unit
Master carpenter
Supv/c/h/carpenter
Supv carpenter
C/h carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
C/h wood machinist
Master painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter's laborer
Painter's laborer
Painter's laborer
Sprayer
Master plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer's laborer
Plasterer's laborer
Plasterer's laborer
Supv c/h stagehand
Stagehand
Stagehand
Stagehand
Stagehand
Rigger
Rigger
Supv c/h drapes
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Furs and leathers especially des for Barbara Carre
Asst dress des
Ward master
Ward asst
Mr. Connery's dresser
MUSIC
Title song sung by
Title song prod by
Title song prod by
Trumpet solo by
Mus mixer
SOUND
Dubbing ed
Dubbing ed
Sd mixer
Sd boom
Sd maintenance
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing asst
Re-rec at
Herts, England
VISUAL EFFECTS
Supv spec vis eff
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Electronics graphics supv
Television, computer and electric eff
Opt spec eff prod supv
Opt supv
Main end titles des and prod by
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff eng
Spec eff eng
Spec eff asst coord
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff diver (Bahamas)
Modeller
MAKEUP
Chief make up artist
Make up & hairdresser to Mr. Connery
Chief hairdresser
Hairdresser
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Consultant to prod
Casting
Casting (U.S.)
Casting (U.S.)
Prod controller
Prod supv
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Kershner
Asst to Mr. Kershner
Assoc to Mr. Schwartzman
Asst to Mr. Schwartzman
Asst to Mr. Schwartzman
Merchandising coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
2d unit-unit mgr
Loc consultant
Underwater consultant
Divemaster
Boatmaster
Unit pub
Tech adv
Title: "Never Say Never Again" by
Prod exec
Cont, 2d unit
Cont (Bahamas)
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant (Bahamas)
Asst prod accountant/Cashier
Accounts secy
Casting secy
Generator driver
Generator driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Cam car driver
Cam car driver, 2d unit
Ward van driver
Loc facilities driver
Loc facilities driver
Loc facilities driver
Loc facilities driver
Const van driver
Pub asst
Pub coord
STAND INS
Stunt consultant 1st and 2d units
Stunt coord
Motorcycle stunts by
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Anim model maker
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on an original story by Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham & Ian Fleming.
SONGS
"Never Say Never Again," music by Michel Legrand, lyric by Alan & Marilyn Bergman
"Une Chanson D'amour," words by Michel Legrand & Jean Drejac, music by Michel Legrand, sung by Sophie Della.
PERFORMERS
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 October 1983
Premiere Information:
premiered in Los Angeles: 6 October 1983
Los Angeles and New York openings: 7 October 1983
Production Date:
27 September 1982--early February 1983
Copyright Claimant:
European Banking Company, Ltd., Manufacturers Hanover, Ltd., M.F.I. Group
Copyright Date:
7 February 1984
Copyright Number:
PA204435
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
134
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
Germany, United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When British Secret Service agent James Bond gives a substandard performance during a training exercise, his superior, “M,” sends him to the Shrublands health resort to improve his physical condition. At the headquarters of international crime syndicate SPECTRE, Ernst Stavro Blofeld informs his staff of the organization’s Middle-East operation, code-named “The Tears of Allah.” Facilitating the operation is brainwashed American Air Force Captain Jack Petachi, implanted with a cornea identical to that of the President of the United States. He is currently ensconced at Shrublands, under the care of SPECTRE agent Fatima Blush. One night, after making love to his chiropractor, James Bond glances out his window to see Fatima physically abusing Capt. Petachi. Fatima recognizes James as he approaches, and leaves during the night, taking Petachi with her. At Swadley Command Center in the United States, Petachi gains access to a computer using his counterfeit eyeprint, and orders the system to install thermonuclear warheads on a pair of missiles undergoing a test launch. Petachi’s escape is thwarted by Fatima, who causes his car to crash and explode. Meanwhile, SPECTRE technicians redirect the missiles and confiscate them. The following day, Ernst Stavro Blofeld addresses the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) via closed-circuit television, and demands twenty-five percent of member nations’ annual oil purchases, or the missiles will be deployed. M apprises James of the situation, informing him that one missile is somewhere on the eastern seaboard of the United States, while the other is in the Middle East, and noting that Capt. Petachi was a likely accomplice. James is sent to the Bahamian island of Nassau, equipped with ... +


When British Secret Service agent James Bond gives a substandard performance during a training exercise, his superior, “M,” sends him to the Shrublands health resort to improve his physical condition. At the headquarters of international crime syndicate SPECTRE, Ernst Stavro Blofeld informs his staff of the organization’s Middle-East operation, code-named “The Tears of Allah.” Facilitating the operation is brainwashed American Air Force Captain Jack Petachi, implanted with a cornea identical to that of the President of the United States. He is currently ensconced at Shrublands, under the care of SPECTRE agent Fatima Blush. One night, after making love to his chiropractor, James Bond glances out his window to see Fatima physically abusing Capt. Petachi. Fatima recognizes James as he approaches, and leaves during the night, taking Petachi with her. At Swadley Command Center in the United States, Petachi gains access to a computer using his counterfeit eyeprint, and orders the system to install thermonuclear warheads on a pair of missiles undergoing a test launch. Petachi’s escape is thwarted by Fatima, who causes his car to crash and explode. Meanwhile, SPECTRE technicians redirect the missiles and confiscate them. The following day, Ernst Stavro Blofeld addresses the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) via closed-circuit television, and demands twenty-five percent of member nations’ annual oil purchases, or the missiles will be deployed. M apprises James of the situation, informing him that one missile is somewhere on the eastern seaboard of the United States, while the other is in the Middle East, and noting that Capt. Petachi was a likely accomplice. James is sent to the Bahamian island of Nassau, equipped with a dossier on SPECTRE agent Maximilian Largo, a fountain pen that fires an explosive charge, and a laser gun disguised as a watch. On his luxury yacht, The Flying Saucer, Maximilian Largo presents Petachi’s sister, Domino, with a diamond pendant bearing the inscription, “The Tears of Allah.” Largo considers it his most valuable possession, besides Domino, and promises to cut her throat if she ever tries to leave him. Upon his arrival on Nassau, James is greeted by the awkward Nigel Small-Fawcett of the British Embassy. Nigel describes Largo as a wealthy philanthropist with an interest in marine biology, and directs James to The Flying Saucer, providing the agent does not cause trouble and upset the island’s tourist trade. Later, James meets Fatima at an outdoor lounge. Unaware that she knows his identity, James accepts her invitation to go SCUBA diving. After making love on Fatima’s boat, she and James explore a sunken ship. She places a tracking device on his back and abandons him to be attacked by electronically controlled sharks. James removes the tracking device, grabs a fishing line, and is pulled to safety by a beautiful female angler. Fatima makes a second attempt on James by placing a time bomb in his hotel room. However, James and his rescuer move their love-making to another room before the bomb detonates. Acting on information from Small-Fawcett, James pursues Largo’s ship to the south of France. James is greeted at the airport by Nicole, a fellow Secret Service agent, and Felix Leiter of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), who take him to their rented villa. Upon learning that Largo is hosting a charity ball that evening, James gains entry and introduces himself to Domino. Aware of James’s identity, Largo invites the agent to play an electronic game called “Domination.” Each player uses two levers, one that controls two nuclear missiles, and one that controls a shield to block them. Following each round, the losing player receives an electric shock, which becomes more severe as the stakes increase. James loses the first three rounds, but defeats Largo in the final round, and requests a dance with Domino as his prize. On the dance floor, James informs Domino of her brother’s death and implicates Largo. Hoping to lead James into a trap, Largo invites him to lunch the next day. James returns to the villa to find Nicole drowned and Fatima driving from the scene. The ensuing high-speed chase ends at a warehouse, with Fatima holding James at gunpoint, demanding he write an affidavit saying she was the greatest lover he ever had. James fires a tiny pellet from his fountain pen, causing Fatima to explode. The next day, James goes diving near The Flying Saucer and is drawn into an airlock. He makes his way to an upper deck and encounters Domino, who tells him that the ship is bound for Largo’s castle on the coast of northern Africa. She creates a distraction by sounding an alarm, allowing James the opportunity to notify M of his destination. Once they reach the castle, Largo locks James in a dungeon and reveals that one of the missiles is hidden under the White House. James frees himself with his laser wristwatch, then rescues Domino, who is being sold into slavery for refusing to marry Largo. They leap from a turret to a boat manned by Felix Leiter, as a Secret Service submarine fires on the castle. Aboard the submarine, M notifies James that one of the missiles is no longer a threat, but the other must be located. The submarine pursues Largo to a petroleum-rich peninsula on the eastern Mediterranean coast, which resembles the image etched on Domino’s diamond pendant. Divers emerge from the hull of The Flying Saucer and follow an underground river, known as “The Tears of Allah,” to the cave containing the second missile. Felix and James follow in “XG7B” jet-propelled modules, but Largo escapes with the missile on a hydroplane. James intercepts Largo and disables the hydroplane, causing it to land on the ocean floor, trapping his adversary underneath. While James disarms the nuclear warhead, Domino appears and shoots Largo with a harpoon gun. Later, James and Domino are visited by Nigel Small-Fawcett, who brings a message from M calling the agent back into action. James declines, saying “Never again,” but Domino doubts his sincerity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.