The Fly II (1989)

R | 104 mins | Horror, Science fiction | 10 February 1989

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HISTORY

The 6 Apr 1988 HR announced that actor Eric Stoltz had been cast in the lead role for the sequel to David Cronenberg's 1986 remake of The Fly (see entry), which was based on the 1958 film, and the 1957 short story written by George Langelaan. Chris Walas, who won an Academy Award for creating the special effects makeup for The Fly, made his directorial debut with this picture. According to HR, Cronenberg had been asked to direct the sequel, but was working on another production at the time. According to the 2 Feb 1989 HR, Chris Walas credits The Fly producer Stuart Cornfeld for giving him his first directorial opportunity. Cornfeld reportedly noticed Walas while working on the original film, and recommended him to direct the sequel. Cornfeld arranged for Walas to meet Mel Brooks, whose company, Brooksfilms, produced the original as well as its $12.5 million follow-up.
       HR reported a twelve-week shooting schedule to begin at Bridge Studios in Vancouver, Canada, with an anticipated Apr 1988 start date. Producers expected to reuse sound stages in Toronto, Canada, where the original film was shot. However, the sequel required a larger facility than was available there at the time, and production shifted to Vancouver.
       Principal photography began on 22 Apr 1988, as cited in the 11 May 1988 Var production chart. Filming was completed on 19 Jul 1988, as reported in a 20 Jul 1988 Var news item.
       The 6 Feb 1989 HR ... More Less

The 6 Apr 1988 HR announced that actor Eric Stoltz had been cast in the lead role for the sequel to David Cronenberg's 1986 remake of The Fly (see entry), which was based on the 1958 film, and the 1957 short story written by George Langelaan. Chris Walas, who won an Academy Award for creating the special effects makeup for The Fly, made his directorial debut with this picture. According to HR, Cronenberg had been asked to direct the sequel, but was working on another production at the time. According to the 2 Feb 1989 HR, Chris Walas credits The Fly producer Stuart Cornfeld for giving him his first directorial opportunity. Cornfeld reportedly noticed Walas while working on the original film, and recommended him to direct the sequel. Cornfeld arranged for Walas to meet Mel Brooks, whose company, Brooksfilms, produced the original as well as its $12.5 million follow-up.
       HR reported a twelve-week shooting schedule to begin at Bridge Studios in Vancouver, Canada, with an anticipated Apr 1988 start date. Producers expected to reuse sound stages in Toronto, Canada, where the original film was shot. However, the sequel required a larger facility than was available there at the time, and production shifted to Vancouver.
       Principal photography began on 22 Apr 1988, as cited in the 11 May 1988 Var production chart. Filming was completed on 19 Jul 1988, as reported in a 20 Jul 1988 Var news item.
       The 6 Feb 1989 HR reported that a fourteen-by-nine foot fly was being displayed that day atop the Cineplex Odeon National theater in New York City's Times Square. Stars Eric Stoltz and Daphne Zuniga were expected to appear at the unveiling.
       The Apr 1989 Box announced an opening weekend box-office take of $6.7 million.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special Thanks to: The British Film Centre/Bridge Studiosdios, Burnaby, B.C.; Sony Communications Products Co./Sony Corp. of America; Grip & lighting equipment by William F. White Limited; John Erickson; D.G.C.; A.C.T.R.A.; I.A.T.S.E. 667; Wang Canada Ltd.; Ray Morales, M.D.; Roy Siegel; Tom Enns; Roland Digital Group; Tektronix Canada, Inc.; and the many carpenters, painters and drivers who worked on the project. Sincere appreciation to the Motion Picture Studio Production Technicians I.A.T.S.E. Local 891, Vancouver, Canada.”
       Actor Frank C. Turner is credited as "Frank Turner" in end credits. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Apr 1989.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jun 1988
p. 30, 32.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1988
p. 1, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 1989
p. 4, 14.
Los Angeles Times
11 Feb 1989
Calendar, p. 3.
New York Times
11 Feb 1989
p. 14.
Variety
11 May 1988.
---
Variety
20 Jul 1988.
---
Variety
15 Feb 1989
pp. 20-21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Brooksfilms Presents
A Brooksfilms Presentation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
Trainee asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Scr
Scr
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Key grip
Still photog
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Cam trainee
Best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Rigging gaffer
Genny op
2d grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Lead man setup grip
Video asst
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept trainee
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Post-prod coord
Post-prod coord
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Const coord
Draughtman
Asst set dec
Set buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set dresser
Storesman
Asst prop master
Prop buyer
Head greensman
Const eng
Const foreman
Head painter
Lead painter
Telepod const
Telepod const
On-set carpenter
On-set painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Costumer
Seamstress
MUSIC
Orch cond
Orch by
Mus ed
Mus eng
Mus mixer
Electronic mus rec by
Mus coord
Mus coord
SOUND
Sd des
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dial/ADR ed
Eff ed
Sd eff rec
Foley ed
Foley walker
Foley walker
Foley walker
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Post-prod asst
Sd intern
VISUAL EFFECTS
Eff created and des by
Creature eff supv
Spec eff makeup supv
Eff shop supv
C.W.I. project coord
Spec eff coord
1st asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Head FX machinist
FX machinist
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Fabricator/Finisher
Sculptor
Sculptor
Sculptor
Mechanical eng
Mechanical eng
Mechanical eng
Mechanical eng
Mechanical eng
Trainee
Trainee
Painter
Painter
Mold maker
Mold maker
Mold maker
C.W.I. purchasing agent
C.W.I. accounting
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Opt compositing
Opt compositing, Lookout Mountain Films
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by, Video Image
Video and graphic displays by, Video Image
Video and graphic displays by, Video Image
Video and graphic displays by, Video Image
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays by, Video Image/Molokai
Main title des by
Titles and opticals
Spec eff makeup
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Asst makeup artist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Prod coord
Unit loc mgr
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Asst prod coord
Asst to Chris Walas
Vancouver casting by
New York casting assoc
Transportation capt
Animal trainer
Loc asst
Post-prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Accounts clerk
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Extras casting
Trainee pub
Asst to the exec prod
Craft service/First aid
Chef's helper
Post prod services
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by George Langelaan.
SONGS
"Lock, Stock And Teardrops," written by Roger Miller, performed by k.d. lang, courtesy of Sire Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Deep Inside Your Love," produced by Wall Street, written by Mark Keller, performed by Wall Street.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Fly 2: The Insect Awakens
The Fly 2
Release Date:
10 February 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 February 1989
Production Date:
22 April--19 July 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
20 April 1989
Copyright Number:
PA408004
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Panavision®
Prints
Fuji Film
Duration(in mins):
104
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29524
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Bartok Industries, a woman named Ronnie gives birth, as a team of scientists observe. After delivering a mutant-looking creature, Ronnie dies. The doctors attend to the strange larva, and when they open it, a human newborn emerges. In time, Mr. Bartok assigns Dr. Jainway the task of raising the infant, and instructs her not to treat the boy as a “laboratory animal.” The child, Martin Brundle, grows at an accelerated rate, quickly absorbs new information, and never sleeps. When Bartok greets Martin, he tells the boy to think of him as a father. Martin soon grows tired of the endless tests he endures, telling a scientist named Dr. Shepard that the aptitude tests are too simple for him. Martin creates his own security badge and sneaks out of his room to explore the facility. He enters a room filled with laboratory animals, and befriends a dog. Sometime later, he returns to visit his only friend and finds that the dog has been transferred to a testing room. Remaining hidden, he watches as scientists place the animal into a teleportation pod, and it disappears. When it reappears in a nearby pod, the friendly dog has been transformed into a vicious creature that attacks a scientist. By Martin’s fifth birthday, his genetic mutation causes him to reach full adult maturation. Bartok grants his wish for privacy, and takes Martin out into the world for the first time. He gives the young man his own apartment, and promises he will no longer be under constant scrutiny of the scientists. Bartok offers Martin a job to use ... +


At Bartok Industries, a woman named Ronnie gives birth, as a team of scientists observe. After delivering a mutant-looking creature, Ronnie dies. The doctors attend to the strange larva, and when they open it, a human newborn emerges. In time, Mr. Bartok assigns Dr. Jainway the task of raising the infant, and instructs her not to treat the boy as a “laboratory animal.” The child, Martin Brundle, grows at an accelerated rate, quickly absorbs new information, and never sleeps. When Bartok greets Martin, he tells the boy to think of him as a father. Martin soon grows tired of the endless tests he endures, telling a scientist named Dr. Shepard that the aptitude tests are too simple for him. Martin creates his own security badge and sneaks out of his room to explore the facility. He enters a room filled with laboratory animals, and befriends a dog. Sometime later, he returns to visit his only friend and finds that the dog has been transferred to a testing room. Remaining hidden, he watches as scientists place the animal into a teleportation pod, and it disappears. When it reappears in a nearby pod, the friendly dog has been transformed into a vicious creature that attacks a scientist. By Martin’s fifth birthday, his genetic mutation causes him to reach full adult maturation. Bartok grants his wish for privacy, and takes Martin out into the world for the first time. He gives the young man his own apartment, and promises he will no longer be under constant scrutiny of the scientists. Bartok offers Martin a job to use his exceptional intelligence at Bartok Industries, and informs him of the teleportation device they have been developing for years. He tells Martin that his real father, Seth Brundle, was a brilliant scientist who died with the secrets to how the device worked. However, Martin refers to what happened to the dog who was placed in the machine, and refuses to take part in the project. Bartok begs him to overlook the incident, and gives Martin videotapes of his father discussing his own experience being teleported. After Martin successfully transports a telephone in the pods, he becomes excited and begins working on transporting organic matter. Soon after, he meets another Bartok employee, Beth Logan, and invites her to see the top-secret teleportation device. However, when he demonstrates using a cactus, the plant is mutilated upon transportation. Later, Martin tells Dr. Jainway that he slept for the first time in his life, but she denies that he is undergoing any metabolic changes. In time, Martin discovers that the “transported” dog had not been put out of its misery, as he was told, but is still living in its mutant state, and being studied by scientists. Martin shows the deformed creature affection before gently ending its life. Martin secures a clearance badge for Beth Logan, and demonstrates his achievement by placing a kitten in the machine and successfully teleporting the creature without mutilating it. Beth is impressed, and later goes home with Martin and has sex with him. Soon after, Martin conducts research on whether the teleportation device can be used to eliminate the mutant genes he possesses. He discovers that it is possible, but another human would need to be sacrificed in the process. When Martin notices a wound on his arm is mutating, Dr. Shepard insists it is only an infection. Martin accuses the scientist of patronizing him. Elsewhere, Dr. Jainway informs Bartok that Martin’s mutant chromosomes are no longer dormant, and that his metamorphosis will happen quickly. In time, Beth’s security clearance is revoked by a menacing guard named Scorby, and she is told that her job is being transferred to an offsite building. Afterward, Scorby gives her a videotape showing her and Martin having sex at his apartment. When she tells Martin, he becomes furious that Bartok has continued to keep him under surveillance. He breaks into the vault room, and after threatening several workers, he watches videotapes of himself since childhood. He sees a recording of his father documenting what happened when he experimented with the teleportation pod, and was “spliced” with a fly that had unknowingly entered the device when he initiated it. When Bartok enters, he tells Martin that he will soon become a fly himself, and Martin is disgusted by his excitement at the opportunity to study him. He tells Bartok he used to love him, before fleeing the facility with his newfound strength. The scientists soon discover that Martin has rigged his computer with a password that will destroy his research if they attempt to log in and operate the teleportation device. Meanwhile, Martin arrives at Beth’s home and she witnesses the beginning of his metamorphosis. When he asks for her help, she embraces him, and takes him to see a scientist named Dr. Stathis, who knew his father. Martin asks for his help to find a cure, but Stathis reveals that he hated Martin’s father, and blamed him for stealing his former girl friend, Ronnie. Stathis reveals that Ronnie, Martin’s mother, killed his father when he tried to force her to get into the teleporter so they would be fused together. When Beth insults Stathis for refusing to help Martin, he offers his speculations that the teleportation pods could somehow be used to reverse Martin’s mutation. Martin denies that solution, and Stathis wonders why he would refuse to try his only option. Before insisting they leave, Stathis lends his jeep to the runaways so they can avoid detection by Bartok. Martin later reveals to Beth that in order to save himself, he would have to sacrifice someone else. When they seek shelter at a motel, Martin’s transformation progresses, and he flees to the nearby woods. Beth chases him, insisting she will never leave him. However, as Martin becomes more fly-like and his personality changes, Beth becomes frightened and telephones Bartok, who arrives in a helicopter to transport Martin back to the laboratory. Larvae form around Martin as he reaches the final stages of his transformation. Meanwhile, Beth is placed in a decontamination chamber before being released to Bartok, who threatens her unless she reveals the password to Martin’s computer. When Martin emerges as a fully formed mutant fly, he kills Dr. Jainway. Bartok orders his men not to harm him, as the creature attacks and kills Dr. Shepard and a security guard. He breaks into the teleportation laboratory, and spews acidic vomit on his pursuers, but does not harm Beth when he comes face to face with her. After the fly kills Scorby, Bartok takes the security guard’s gun and shoots it. However, the creature overpowers Bartok, enters the password on Martin’s computer, and gets into the teleportation pod with Bartok. Beth enters the final command to start the teleportation program, and both men emerge as mutants. However, when Beth removes the larvae covering Martin, she sees he has returned to his human state. Bartok, now a mutant, is held captive and observed by scientists. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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