An Innocent Man (1989)

R | 113 mins | Drama | 6 October 1989

Full page view
HISTORY

In an interview which appeared in the 6-13 Oct 1989 issue of The Georgia Straight, first-time screenwriter Larry Brothers revealed that the film was based in part on his own experiences. "I was a junkie for a lot of years," he said, "and I spent 10 years in and out of various institutions--prisons, mental institutions, drug rehab programs."
       The 15 Aug 1988 DV “Short Takes” column announced that Tom Selleck would star in Hard Rain, which would be directed by Carroll Ballard. However, less than a month later, the 9 Sep 1988 DV noted that Ballard was leaving the production “due to the usual creative differences.” On 12 Jan 1989, DV noted that Peter Yates was “readying to start,” and the title was changed to An Innocent Man before the film’s release.
       Locations used include The Broadlind Hotel on Linden Ave, the Superior Court Building at 415 W. Ocean Blvd, and Shoreline Village in Long Beach, CA. Other locations included Nevada State Penitentiary at Carson City, NV; Cincinnati Correctional Institute at Camp Washington, OH; and a house in San Pedro, CA.
       According to production notes for the film in the AMPAS library files, a dozen prison locations were scouted before it was decided to shoot interiors at Cincinnati Correctional Institute, which opened in 1869 and shuttered in 1980, and exteriors at Nevada State Penitentiary, which first opened in 1861. About 350 of the Nevada prison’s 700 inmates were used as extras in the film.
       Critical response was tepid. A typical reaction was expressed in Duane Byrge's 4 Oct 1989 HR review, which ... More Less

In an interview which appeared in the 6-13 Oct 1989 issue of The Georgia Straight, first-time screenwriter Larry Brothers revealed that the film was based in part on his own experiences. "I was a junkie for a lot of years," he said, "and I spent 10 years in and out of various institutions--prisons, mental institutions, drug rehab programs."
       The 15 Aug 1988 DV “Short Takes” column announced that Tom Selleck would star in Hard Rain, which would be directed by Carroll Ballard. However, less than a month later, the 9 Sep 1988 DV noted that Ballard was leaving the production “due to the usual creative differences.” On 12 Jan 1989, DV noted that Peter Yates was “readying to start,” and the title was changed to An Innocent Man before the film’s release.
       Locations used include The Broadlind Hotel on Linden Ave, the Superior Court Building at 415 W. Ocean Blvd, and Shoreline Village in Long Beach, CA. Other locations included Nevada State Penitentiary at Carson City, NV; Cincinnati Correctional Institute at Camp Washington, OH; and a house in San Pedro, CA.
       According to production notes for the film in the AMPAS library files, a dozen prison locations were scouted before it was decided to shoot interiors at Cincinnati Correctional Institute, which opened in 1869 and shuttered in 1980, and exteriors at Nevada State Penitentiary, which first opened in 1861. About 350 of the Nevada prison’s 700 inmates were used as extras in the film.
       Critical response was tepid. A typical reaction was expressed in Duane Byrge's 4 Oct 1989 HR review, which stated that the film "muddles along more as a soapy melodrama than a hard-edged action piece." In her 29 Oct 1989 LAT "outtakes" column, Pat Broeske noted that the film had only grossed $14.5 million at the box-office in its first three weeks of release.
       The following acknowledgements appear in the end credits: "The Producers Wish to Thank: Department of Prisons, Nevada State Prison, Carson City, Nevada; Nevada Film Commission; Ohio Film Commission; Department of County Buildings, Hamilton County Sheriff's Department, Hamilton County, Ohio; Shoreline Village, Long Beach, California." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Aug 1988.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1988.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 May 1989
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Oct 1989
p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
29 Oct 1989.
---
New York Times
6 Oct 1989
p. 15.
The Georgia Straight
6-13 Oct 1989
p. 15.
Variety
18 Oct 1989
p. 30, 32.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures presents
in association with Silver Screen Partners IV
An Interscope Communications Production
A Peter Yates Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d cam asst
1st asst 2d cam
Still photog
Video assist op
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Elec best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Prop master
Asst props
Const foreman
Standby painter
Standby painter
Const
Const
Labor foreman
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Cableman
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Opticals
Spec eff asst
MAKEUP
Mr. Selleck's makeup by
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Extras casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Robert Cort
Asst to Scott Kroopf
Asst to Tom Selleck
Asst to Tom Selleck
Asst to Peter Yates
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Tech adv
Tech adv
Staff coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod exec
Projectionist
Catering
Tech adv
Tech adv
Registered nurse
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"When The Night Comes" written by Bryan Adams, Jim Vallance and Diane Warren, performed by Joe Cocker, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc. by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Hard Rain
Release Date:
6 October 1989
Premiere Information:
Cincinnati world premiere: 21 September 1989
Los Angeles and New York openings: 6 October 1989
Production Date:
4 February--mid March 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, a.a.d.o. the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
12 October 1989
Copyright Number:
PA429207
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29930
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Following a tip that a drug deal is going down at 420 Oak Way, corrupt drug enforcement cops Danny Scalise and Mike Parnell mistakenly conduct a raid on the house of aircraft maintenance supervisor Jimmie Rainwood, located at 420 Oak Lane. Jimmie has just come home after a long shift at work, taken a shower, and is drying his hair as the police enter. Parnell mistakes the blowdryer for a gun and shoots Jimmie. When Scalise and Parnell realize their error, they plant drugs in Jimmie’s home, put a gun in his hand, and fire a shot to make it look as if their actions were a “clean” bust. Internal Affairs officer John Fitzgerald investigates the officer-involved shooting. However, the case against Jimmie moves ahead, and his attorney advises him to plead guilty to drug possession and a reduced charge of reckless endangerment. If Jimmie agrees to the deal, he faces the possibility of a six-month sentence, versus as many as twelve years if he is found guilty at trial. Jimmie refuses to confess to something he did not do. At trial, a false witness named Stevie testifies that he purchased drugs from Jimmie, who is convicted and sentenced to six years in prison. At the Oroville state facility, Jimmie befriends Robby, who takes it upon himself to show Jimmie “the ropes” of prison life. Robby is soon knifed and set on fire by two inmates in the prison yard. As guards fire warning shots, Jimmie attempts to assist Robby, but is tackled by Virgil Cane before he can be shot. In the prison hallway, Jimmie is accosted by “Jingles” and two other black ... +


Following a tip that a drug deal is going down at 420 Oak Way, corrupt drug enforcement cops Danny Scalise and Mike Parnell mistakenly conduct a raid on the house of aircraft maintenance supervisor Jimmie Rainwood, located at 420 Oak Lane. Jimmie has just come home after a long shift at work, taken a shower, and is drying his hair as the police enter. Parnell mistakes the blowdryer for a gun and shoots Jimmie. When Scalise and Parnell realize their error, they plant drugs in Jimmie’s home, put a gun in his hand, and fire a shot to make it look as if their actions were a “clean” bust. Internal Affairs officer John Fitzgerald investigates the officer-involved shooting. However, the case against Jimmie moves ahead, and his attorney advises him to plead guilty to drug possession and a reduced charge of reckless endangerment. If Jimmie agrees to the deal, he faces the possibility of a six-month sentence, versus as many as twelve years if he is found guilty at trial. Jimmie refuses to confess to something he did not do. At trial, a false witness named Stevie testifies that he purchased drugs from Jimmie, who is convicted and sentenced to six years in prison. At the Oroville state facility, Jimmie befriends Robby, who takes it upon himself to show Jimmie “the ropes” of prison life. Robby is soon knifed and set on fire by two inmates in the prison yard. As guards fire warning shots, Jimmie attempts to assist Robby, but is tackled by Virgil Cane before he can be shot. In the prison hallway, Jimmie is accosted by “Jingles” and two other black prisoners. That evening in the mess hall, a white prisoner from the Aryan Brotherhood tells Jimmie he will need to kill Jingles, or all the white prisoners will “suffer” at the hands of the black prisoners. Later, Jimmie’s wife, Kate, meets with Fitzgerald seeking help for her husband, and reiterates her contention that the arresting officers lied under oath. Fitzgerald wants to help, but insists he needs evidence of their guilt. In the prison workshop, Jimmie is called to meet with Virgil, who tells him that he can either handle his issues with Jingles himself, or fall under the service of the Aryan Brotherhood. Jimmie wants to know what interest Virgil has in him. Virgil reveals that his last conviction was at the hands of the same officers who arrested Jimmie. When Kate visits Jimmie in prison, she reveals that she is pushing for his appeal, but does not have encouraging news. He asks if she is well, and tells her that he can stand prison if he knows she is okay. On a work detail, Jimmie is once again confronted by Jingles and his two cronies. Jingles demands that Jimmie turn over his “outside cash,” and the three men beat him. During his recovery, Jimmie is locked up in “segregation” for fifteen days for refusing to name the assailants. After he is released from segregation, Jimmie is confronted in the prison workout room by Jingles, who threatens to gang rape him. Afterwards, Jimmie tells Virgil that he is ready to work out his “problem.” Prisoners fashion a knife from a piece of broken glass, and Jingles is poisoned when a cafeteria server puts something in his mashed potatoes. During a recreational basketball game that evening, Jingles doubles over in pain and takes himself out of play to use the restroom. Following the plan Virgil laid out for him, Jimmie stabs Jingles, breaks off the knife at the handle, and drops the handle down a bathroom floor drain. The prison guard knows that he knifed Jingles, but cannot prove it. Regardless, Jimmie is sentenced to ninety days in solitary confinement. On the outside, Scalise and Parnell threaten Kate for pursuing the truth. Fitzgerald confronts Danny and Mike off the record and warns them to stay away from Kate. After three and a half years in prison, Jimmie becomes eligible for parole, and Virgil proposes that Jimmie take revenge on the cops that framed him. Although he refuses, he gives Virgil his phone number before he leaves. Back home, Jimmie and Kate are visited by Scalise and Parnell, who tell them that the state will always believe cops over an ex-con. Realizing his family will never be free from their taunts, Jimmie tells Kate he intends to do “whatever it takes” to bring them down. Kate reluctantly agrees, and visits Virgil in prison to enlist his help. With the aid of Virgil’s associate, Malcolm, Jimmie and Kate approach Fitzgerald armed with information that Scalise and Parnell are collaborating with drug kingpin Joseph Donatelli. Jimmie tells Fitzgerald that he must be ready at a moment’s notice for the call, when he will be able to witness the corrupt cops buying cocaine. Using the informant Stevie as a go-between, Scalise and Parnell hear of a dope deal. They arrest the dealers and gain twenty-five to thirty kilos of cocaine. However, when they take the arrestees to be booked, they claim the deal netted just two kilos of the drug. They then learn that the two men are employees of the drug dealer, and that he is unhappy over their arrest. On their way to return the drugs and explain themselves to Donatelli, Scalise and Parnell are waylaid by Jimmie and his confederates, who handcuff the officers and take the cocaine. To buy time, Scalise and Parnell tell Donatelli that they will return his drugs the next day. Donatelli gives them until noon, and says that he will kill them and their families if they fail to deliver. Back at the police station, Scalise and Parnell receive a phone call from Malcolm, claiming to be one of the men that held them up. Malcolm tells the cops that he and his associates demand $20,000, and sets a place to make the transfer. As Jimmie prepares for the final confrontation with Scalise and Parnell, he tells Kate that they will soon have their lives back, but urges her to leave him if he is arrested again. At the transfer point, Malcolm meets Scalise and Parnell, and hands them a portion of the drugs. Parnell grabs Malcolm and holds a gun to his head, demanding that the rest of the load be handed over. In a nearby car, Fitzgerald watches and records the conversation. To save Malcolm's life, Jimmie reveals himself, hands the drugs to Scalise, and pleads for Parnell to let Malcolm go. However, as Malcolm walks toward Jimmie, Parnell shoots him in the back. Fitzgerald announces himself and attempts to arrest the rogue cops, but is nearly run over by Scalise. Fitzgerald kills Scalise, but Parnell gets away, telling the gathering crowd of curious onlookers that he is a cop. Jimmy tackles Parnell, and a fight ensues. Jimmie grabs Parnell’s knife and nearly slits his throat when Kate arrives, begging him to withdraw. Jimmie complies, but gives Parnell a final beating. As Parnell begins his sentence at Oroville State Prison, he marches toward his cell and hears someone shout, “Hey, officer!” He looks up to see Virgil grinning down at him from a cellblock above. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime, Prison


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.