K-9 (1989)

PG-13 | 102 mins | Comedy | 28 April 1989

Director:

Rod Daniel

Cinematographer:

Dean Semler

Production Designer:

George Costello

Production Company:

Gordon Company
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HISTORY

A 22 Feb 1987 LAT news piece reported that when 20th Century Fox received the script for K-9 by first-time writers Andrew Charles and Scott Myers, they did not like the writing, but loved the concept. What the studio did not know was that “Andrew Charles” was a pseudonym for Steve Siegel, an assistant to 20th Century Fox executive Michael Levy. The studio offered the writers $30,000 for the first draft, but a bidding war with other studios occurred. The winning bid came from Universal Pictures, for $300,000, plus an additional $300,000 if K-9 was produced.
       A 16 Aug 1988 HR production chart reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin that month, and a 23 Dec 1988 Back Stage reported filming had recently been completed after two months of shooting in San Diego, CA. The production reportedly employed 2,016 San Diego locals and spent upward of $3.1 million in the area.
       Although critical reviews were mixed, K-9 grossed $40 million at the box office, according to an article in the 21 Jun 1989 LAT.
T K-9 spawned two sequels, both starring James Belushi: K-911 (1999) and K-9: PI (2002). Both were direct-to-video releases.
       The search for “Jerry Lee,” the German shepherd, began in 1987, as noted in a 22 May 1989 People article. The dog was ultimately played by “Rando,” one of four German shepherds that Gail Mooring of K-9 Paws (a technical advisor on the film) bought in West Germany for $10,000, after failing to find the right dog in ... More Less

A 22 Feb 1987 LAT news piece reported that when 20th Century Fox received the script for K-9 by first-time writers Andrew Charles and Scott Myers, they did not like the writing, but loved the concept. What the studio did not know was that “Andrew Charles” was a pseudonym for Steve Siegel, an assistant to 20th Century Fox executive Michael Levy. The studio offered the writers $30,000 for the first draft, but a bidding war with other studios occurred. The winning bid came from Universal Pictures, for $300,000, plus an additional $300,000 if K-9 was produced.
       A 16 Aug 1988 HR production chart reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin that month, and a 23 Dec 1988 Back Stage reported filming had recently been completed after two months of shooting in San Diego, CA. The production reportedly employed 2,016 San Diego locals and spent upward of $3.1 million in the area.
       Although critical reviews were mixed, K-9 grossed $40 million at the box office, according to an article in the 21 Jun 1989 LAT.
T K-9 spawned two sequels, both starring James Belushi: K-911 (1999) and K-9: PI (2002). Both were direct-to-video releases.
       The search for “Jerry Lee,” the German shepherd, began in 1987, as noted in a 22 May 1989 People article. The dog was ultimately played by “Rando,” one of four German shepherds that Gail Mooring of K-9 Paws (a technical advisor on the film) bought in West Germany for $10,000, after failing to find the right dog in the U.S. Part of the difficulty, according to Mooring, was that German shepherds in the U.S. were bred for dark pigment. Animal trainer Karl Miller taught all four dogs English and trained them for the film. After twelve weeks, Rando, who could perform over 125 actions, was picked to star in the film.
       The following written statement appears in end credits: "The producers would like to give special thanks to: City of San Diego, San Diego Mayor's Office, San Diego Motion Picture and Television Bureau." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Back Stage
23 Dec 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 1989
p. 4, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1998.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Feb 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Apr 1989
p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
21 Jul 1989.
---
New York Times
28 Apr 1989
p. 19.
People
22 May 1989.
---
Variety
3 May 1989
p. 12, 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Gordon Company Production
A Rod Daniel Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
Film loader
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Best boy grip
Still photog
Projectionist
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Storyboard artist
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept mgr
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Asst film ed
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Addl ed
1st asst ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Asst set dec
Set dresser
Leadman
Swing gang key
Swing
Prop master
Asst prop master
2d asst prop
Const coord
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Set painter
Set painter
Labor foreman
Laborer
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Asst costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus contractor
Mus rec by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Dog vocals ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd eff rec
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley walker
Foley walker
VISUAL EFFECTS
Mechanical eff coord
Mechanical eff coord, Image Engineering, Inc.
Eff key
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Eff tech
Image coord
Title des
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Animal action by
Asst animal trainer
Prod coord
Scr supv
K-9 tech adv
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Prod secy
Prod liaison
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Accounting prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Mr. Belushi's driver
Mr. Belushi's driver
Shotmaker driver
Caterer
Caterer
Craft service
Asst craft service
Unit pub
Asst to Rod Daniel
Asst to Lawrence Gordon
Asst to Lawrence Gordon
Asst to Charles Gordon
Asst to Charles Gordon
Asst to Donna Smith
Asst to Lloyd Levin
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Animal handler
Animal handler
Prod utility
Prod utility
Prod utility
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras coord
Promotional coord
Promotional asst
First aid
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Iko Iko," written by Hawkins/Jones/Hawkins/Jones/Johnson/Jones/Thomas, performed by Amy Holland
"Main Title (Theme From 'Jaws')," music composed by John Williams, courtesy of MCA Records
"I Feel Good," written by James Brown, performed by James Brown, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Iko Iko," written by Hawkins/Jones/Hawkins/Jones/Johnson/Jones/Thomas, performed by Amy Holland
"Main Title (Theme From 'Jaws')," music composed by John Williams, courtesy of MCA Records
"I Feel Good," written by James Brown, performed by James Brown, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Records, Inc.
"Oh Yea," written by Boris Blank and Dieter Meir, performed by Yello, courtesy of Polygram Records, Inc.
"Car Wash," written by Norman Whitfield, performed by Rose Royce, courtesy of MCA Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 April 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 April 1989
Production Date:
fall 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 August 1989
Copyright Number:
PA436610
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® camera & lenses
Duration(in mins):
102
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29714
SYNOPSIS

San Diego detective Mike Dooley sits in his car on lover’s lane awaiting an informant. Realizing he is going to be late for a date, he asks a partially dressed couple in a Rolls Royce to use their car telephone. A helicopter appears and a hoodlum, “Benny the Mule,” machine guns Dooley’s automobile before flying away. Dooley rushes to the police station to request another car. Lieutenant Roger Byers refuses to give him one unless he takes a partner. Dooley insults Byers, and Byers punches him in the face. Arriving home three hours late, Dooley finds a romantic dinner set out on the table. He apologizes to his girl friend, Tracy, who accuses him of putting work before their relationship. The next morning, Dooley spots his informant, Freddie, who failed to show up the night before. As payback, Dooley takes Freddie on a “jog” by handcuffing him to his automobile and driving down the street. Freddie confesses that Ken Lyman, a major drug dealer who pretends to be a businessman, is storing narcotics in a warehouse complex, but suggests that Dooley will never find the drugs unless he has a “great nose.” At a crime scene, Dooley persuades K-9 officer Brannigan to help him get a police dog. Brannigan takes him to the police kennels and warns him that the available dog, Jerry Lee, is semi-retired due to stress. Dooley suits up and enters the cage, but the dog does not react. Brannigan suggests Dooley give a command. Dooley yells “Kill!” Jerry Lee attacks, bringing Dooley to ground. Brannigan brags that Jerry Lee ... +


San Diego detective Mike Dooley sits in his car on lover’s lane awaiting an informant. Realizing he is going to be late for a date, he asks a partially dressed couple in a Rolls Royce to use their car telephone. A helicopter appears and a hoodlum, “Benny the Mule,” machine guns Dooley’s automobile before flying away. Dooley rushes to the police station to request another car. Lieutenant Roger Byers refuses to give him one unless he takes a partner. Dooley insults Byers, and Byers punches him in the face. Arriving home three hours late, Dooley finds a romantic dinner set out on the table. He apologizes to his girl friend, Tracy, who accuses him of putting work before their relationship. The next morning, Dooley spots his informant, Freddie, who failed to show up the night before. As payback, Dooley takes Freddie on a “jog” by handcuffing him to his automobile and driving down the street. Freddie confesses that Ken Lyman, a major drug dealer who pretends to be a businessman, is storing narcotics in a warehouse complex, but suggests that Dooley will never find the drugs unless he has a “great nose.” At a crime scene, Dooley persuades K-9 officer Brannigan to help him get a police dog. Brannigan takes him to the police kennels and warns him that the available dog, Jerry Lee, is semi-retired due to stress. Dooley suits up and enters the cage, but the dog does not react. Brannigan suggests Dooley give a command. Dooley yells “Kill!” Jerry Lee attacks, bringing Dooley to ground. Brannigan brags that Jerry Lee is the best drug-sniffing dog in the city. At the warehouse Freddie told him about, Dooley is humiliated when Jerry Lee does not follow his commands, until he tells the dog to “find the dope.” Just as Ken Lyman appears and asks Dooley for his search warrant, Jerry Lee runs up to a small shed and barks. Dooley replies that the dog smells drugs, therefore he does not need a warrant. He kicks the door down to find a worker smoking a marijuana cigarette. Lyman asks if he should call in a task force for one “joint.” Infuriated, Dooley drives to a dive bar and orders Jerry Lee to stay in the car. Inside, Dooley interrupts a barroom brawl in progress. Everyone stops when Benny the Mule identifies Dooley as a cop. When thugs leap on Dooley, Jerry Lee comes in snarling. Benny hurls a cue ball at the dog, who catches it, bites it in half, and attacks. Jerry Lee soon has the men against the wall. Benny picks up a pool cue, and Jerry Lee bites him in the crotch. Dooley urges Benny to talk. Benny blurts out that Lyman is making a drug deal with a man named Gilliam. Uniformed police arrive, and Benny is arrested for attempted murder. Dooley steps outside and berates Jerry Lee for losing his composure and leaving the car. Jerry Lee buries his face in his paws to show he is sorry. Claiming the dog stinks, Dooley buys Jerry Lee “doggy deodorant,” but the canine almost bites his hand off when he sprays it on him, so Dooley runs the dog through a car wash in a convertible with the top down. Dooley lectures Jerry Lee that he is boss and will always win an argument, and the animal responds by biting out the car radio. At Lyman’s mansion, Freddie promises he did not tell Dooley about the warehouse. Lyman shoots him in the head and orders his right-hand man, Dillon, to kill Dooley. Dooley takes Jerry Lee home, pretending he is a gift for Tracy. She instantly falls in love with the dog and instructs him to do tricks. When Dooley tries to kiss her, Jerry Lee snarls. Dooley takes Jerry Lee aside and informs him that Tracy is his. The next day, when Dooley goes to a fancy restaurant, he ties Jerry Lee to the car mirror so he will stay. Inside, he identifies Gilliam, Lyman’s partner, by having a waiter bring the criminal a bottle of champagne. Jerry Lee arrives, dragging the car mirror behind him as Gilliam leaves. They follow Gilliam to the beach, and observe him meeting with Lyman. However, before Dooley can get close, Jerry Lee spots a flying Frisbee and gives chase, dragging Dooley with him. Later, at a doughnut shop, a hitman takes a shot at Dooley and drives off. During the ensuing car chase, the hitman crashes into a woodshed, then flees on foot. Dooley and Jerry Lee pursue the man across rooftops until he slips and falls through a skylight. A quick search of the would-be killer’s car leads them to a Mercedes dealership. Halstead, the owner, says he recently reported a Mercedes was stolen from his lot. Jerry Lee smells drugs in a red convertible, but Dooley drags him away, explaining they will wait for Halstead to make the exchange with Lyman before making any arrests. Dooley returns home to discover Tracy has been kidnapped. A message on his answering machine promises that if he lets the drug shipment go through, Tracy will be released unharmed. Dooley drives to Lyman’s mansion, where he finds a dinner party in progress. He accuses Lyman of being a murderer and drug runner, and puts a gun to his head just as police arrive and drag him away. Lt. Byers puts Dooley and Jerry Lee under arrest. As Byers drives to the police station, Jerry Lee passes gas, causing Byers to pull over and let the dog out. When Jerry Lee does not return, Byers and Dooley step out to find him. Dooley sees the dog sneak back into the police car, leaps in, and drives off without Byers. Back at the dealership, Dooley watches Halstead get into a car carrier full off automobiles. He sounds the siren and orders Halstead to pull over. Instead, Halstead opens fire with a shotgun, blowing out Dooley’s engine. Jerry Lee leaps into the carrier and forces Halstead to stop. Dooley drives the carrier to the drug rendezvous. Spotting Tracy in Lyman’s car, he holds up what looks like a detonator and informs Lyman the car carrier is wired with explosives. The drug buyer arrives in a helicopter. Dooley offers to swap the carrier for Tracy, but as Lyman is ready to make the exchange, the device in Dooley’s hand beeps, revealing it to be a handheld video game. Bullets fly as Jerry Lee springs from the carrier and attacks Dillon. Lyman shoots Jerry Lee and races toward the helicopter, but Dooley kills Lyman, and the helicopter lifts off. Tracy and Dooley rush Jerry Lee to a human hospital, where a doctor refuses to operate on the dog. Dooley pulls his revolver, declaring that Jerry Lee is a cop and his partner, and the doctor changes his mind. Later, Dooley finds Jerry Lee unconscious and thinks he is dead. Jerry Lee wakes up, but keeps his eyes shut as Dooley apologizes for how badly he treated his partner. When he realizes Jerry Lee is faking, Dooley reprimands him, but calms down when the dog licks his face. Days later, Dooley takes Tracy and Jerry Lee on a vacation to Las Vegas, Nevada. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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