Road House (1989)

R | 114 mins | Comedy | 19 May 1989

Full page view
HISTORY

Several sources, including the 23 Feb 1988 HR, the 14 Jun 1988 HR, and the 7 May 1989 LAT, erroneously refer to the film as Roadhouse, rather than Road House.
       Articles in the 23 Feb 1988 HR, the 20 Apr 1988 DV, and the 26 Apr 1988 HR state that R. Lance Hill and Hilary Henkin wrote the Road House screenplay. However, onscreen credits note the story is by David Lee Henry, with the screenplay by David Lee Henry and Hilary Henkin. Reportedly, David Lee Henry is a pseudonym used by R. Lance Hill. The Oliver Stone Encyclopedia by James Michael Welsh and Donald M. Whaley states that R. Lance Hill was credited as David Lee Henry on the 1986 film 8 Million Ways to Die (see entry). While some sources claim that David Lee Henry was the pseudonym used by Robert Towne on that film, the book Virgin Film: Oliver Stone by Stephen Lavnington reported that David Lee Henry “heavily rewrote” Oliver Stone’s original script, “with later amendments by Robert Towne, renowned in Hollywood as a freelance script doctor.”
       According to the 4 May 1988 Var, principal photography began 18 Apr 1988. The 11 Jul 1988 DV stated the film’s budget was $15 million. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the use of Southern California locations in the Santa Clarita Valley included Newhall, Valencia, and Canyon Country. The filmmakers also traveled to Reedley, CA, to film at the Harris Ranch on ... More Less

Several sources, including the 23 Feb 1988 HR, the 14 Jun 1988 HR, and the 7 May 1989 LAT, erroneously refer to the film as Roadhouse, rather than Road House.
       Articles in the 23 Feb 1988 HR, the 20 Apr 1988 DV, and the 26 Apr 1988 HR state that R. Lance Hill and Hilary Henkin wrote the Road House screenplay. However, onscreen credits note the story is by David Lee Henry, with the screenplay by David Lee Henry and Hilary Henkin. Reportedly, David Lee Henry is a pseudonym used by R. Lance Hill. The Oliver Stone Encyclopedia by James Michael Welsh and Donald M. Whaley states that R. Lance Hill was credited as David Lee Henry on the 1986 film 8 Million Ways to Die (see entry). While some sources claim that David Lee Henry was the pseudonym used by Robert Towne on that film, the book Virgin Film: Oliver Stone by Stephen Lavnington reported that David Lee Henry “heavily rewrote” Oliver Stone’s original script, “with later amendments by Robert Towne, renowned in Hollywood as a freelance script doctor.”
       According to the 4 May 1988 Var, principal photography began 18 Apr 1988. The 11 Jul 1988 DV stated the film’s budget was $15 million. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the use of Southern California locations in the Santa Clarita Valley included Newhall, Valencia, and Canyon Country. The filmmakers also traveled to Reedley, CA, to film at the Harris Ranch on the banks of the King River. “The Bandstand” club where the character of “Dalton” is introduced was filmed at a club with the same name in Anaheim, CA.
       The film received mostly negative reviews. The 7 May 1989 LAT reported that Road House was removed from a Jun 1989 Premiere article predicting the “summer’s top twenty money-makers,” and an MGM/UA representative acknowledged the film was on that list until the Premiere writers saw Road House. The 28 May 1989 LAT reported the film’s first weekend box-office gross was $5.9 million.
       An item in the 30 Aug 2004 Var reported that MGM was entering the direct-to-DVD business and planned a sequel to Road House. Road House 2: Last Call was released on video in 2006.
       The 15 Jan 2004 HR announced a stage adaptation of the film at the Barrow Street Theater in New York City. The play was titled Road House: The Stage Version of the Cinema Classic That Starred Patrick Swayze, Except This One Stars Taimak, from the ‘80s Cult Classic “The Last Dragon,” Wearing a Blonde Mullet Wig.
       A 9 Sep 2015 Var article announced that Ronda Rousey, an Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fighter, would star in MGM’s remake of Road House. Principal photography is planned to begin in 2016.
End credits include the following statement: “Special thanks to: Armand Hammer, Big Foot 4 X 4 Inc., Brad Brown and Associates, California Film Commission, Disco Lighting From Today’s Music, Heuer Time and Electronics Corp., Kawasaki Motor Corp., Marsha Gleeman, Mercedes Benz of North America, Michelin Tires, Norm Marshall and Associates, Novtele, Southwest Auto Leasing, Pepsi Cola®, Picadilly Inn at University, Prop Art, P.V. Electronics Roy Lott, Vista Group.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Apr 1988.
---
Daily Variety
11 Jul 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 1988
p. 4, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1989
p. 4, 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 2004.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 May 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 May 1989
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
28 May 1989.
---
New York Times
19 May 1989
p. 17.
Variety
4 May 1988.
---
Variety
24 May 1989
p. 34.
Variety
30 Aug 2004.
---
Variety
9 Sep 2015
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
United Artists Presents
A Silver Pictures Production
From United Artists, An MGM/UA Communications Company
In Association with Star Partners II, Ltd.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Still photog
Playback op
Chief set lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Generator op (Sequoia)
Musco light op
Musco light op
Key grip
Best boy grip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Visual consultant/ Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Weapons specialist
Const coord
Const foreman
Labor foreman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Standby painter
Greensman
Knives des and built by
Weatherford, TX
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Women's set costumer
Men's set costumer
Addl costumer
Addl costumer
Asst to cost des
MUSIC
Mus score by
Featured mus performance by
Playback op
Mus ed
Supv mus ed
Orch cond by
Scoring mixer
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable op
Supv sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd eff rec
Post prod dial
Supv dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Asst dial ed
Supv ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Voice casting
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley by
Foley by
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd asst
Machine op
Machine op
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Eng
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff transportation
Spec opt effects by
Main and end titles des by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Scr supv
Martial arts tech adv
Tai chi tech adv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Joel Silver
Asst to Joel Silver
Asst to Joel Silver
Asst to Patrick Swayze
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting assoc
Dial coach
Extras casting
Extras casting
Spec talent coord
First aid
Transportation coord
Set transportation coord
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Caterer
Craft service
Craft service
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Accounting asst
Pub coord
Projectionist
Process coord
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Don’t Throw Stones,” written by Tito Larriva, produced by Waddy Wachtel, performed by Cruzados, courtesy of Arista Records
“Savoire Faire,” written by Willy DeVille, produced by Waddy Wachtel, performed by Cruzados, courtesy of Arista Records
“On The Road Again,” written by Floyd V. Jones and Alan C. Wilson, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
+
SONGS
“Don’t Throw Stones,” written by Tito Larriva, produced by Waddy Wachtel, performed by Cruzados, courtesy of Arista Records
“Savoire Faire,” written by Willy DeVille, produced by Waddy Wachtel, performed by Cruzados, courtesy of Arista Records
“On The Road Again,” written by Floyd V. Jones and Alan C. Wilson, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Confidence Man,” written by John Hiatt, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Runaround Sue,” written by Dion Di Mucci and Ernest Maresca, performed by Dion, courtesy of Laurie Records by arrangement with Continental Communications Corp
“Long Tall Sally,” written by Robert Blackwell, Enotris Johnson and Richard Penniman, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Travelin’ Band,” written by J. C. Fogerty, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Good Heart,” written by Maria McKee, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by Kris McKay, courtesy of Arista Records
“Blue Monday,” written by Dave Bartholomew and Antoine “Fats” Domino, produced by Bob Seger, performed by Bob Seger, courtesy of Capitol Records
“Sh-Boom,” written by James Keys, Carl Feaster, Claude Feaster, Floyd McRae and James W. Edwards, performed by The Crew Cuts, courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc
“One Foot On The Gravel,” written by Jeff Healey, Tom Stephan and Joseph Rockman, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Hear That Guitar Ring,” written by Jack Lavin and Tom Lavin, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Mustang Sally,” written by Bonny Rice, performed by Wilson Pickett, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Knock On Wood,” written by Eddie Floyd and Steve Cropper, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band and Kathleen Wilhoite, The Jeff Healey Band appears courtesy of Arista Records
“I’m Tore Down,” written by Sonny Thompson, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Fire In The Night,” written by Bob Corbin, performed by Alabama, courtesy of RCA Records
“Do You Really Want Me,” written by Keith Holland, Geri Berry and Kristine Weitz, performed by Kristine Weitz, courtesy of Genius Records, a division of Jam-Power, Inc
“Roadhouse Blues,” written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, John Densmore and Ray Manzarek, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“I Sold My Soul To Rock And Roll,” written by Klaus Thiel and Paul Psilias, performed by Bullet, courtesy of Arista Records
“These Arms Of Mine,” written by Otis Redding, performed by Otis Redding, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Projects
“Raising Heaven (In Hell) Tonight,” written by Willie Nile and Martin Briley, produced by David Kershenbaum and Bob Marlette, performed by Patrick Swayze
“Cliff’s Edge,” written by Patrick Swayze, Stacy Widelitz and Bob Marlette, produced by David Kershenbaum and Bob Marlette, performed by Patrick Swayze
“Right From The Start,” written by Billy Herzig and Randy Watkins, performed by Earl Thomas Conley, courtesy of RCA Records
“All My Ex’s Live In Texas,” written by Sanger D. Shafer and Lyndia J. Shafer, performed by George Strait, courtesy of MCA Records
“Rad Gumbo,” written by Bill Payne, Paul Barrere, Martin Kibbee, Sam Clayton and Kenny Gradney, produced by George Massenburg and Bill Payne, performed by Little Feat, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“White Room,” written by Jack Bruce and Peter Brown, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“Hoochie Coochie Man,” written by Willie Dixon, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records
“When The Night Comes Falling From The Sky,” written by Bob Dylan, produced by Jimmy Iovine, performed by The Jeff Healey Band, courtesy of Arista Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Roadhouse
Release Date:
19 May 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 19 May 1989
Production Date:
began 18 April 1988
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording® Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
114
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29677
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Frank Tilghman, owner of the Double Deuce road house in Jasper, Missouri, travels to New York City to hire legendary bouncer, Dalton, to help clean up the Double Deuce. Dalton leaves his decrepit automobile in New York and drives his Mercedes-Benz to Jasper, where he purchases another decrepit car and several tires. He rents an apartment over a barn from a local farmer named Emmet. Across the river is the mansion of Brad Wesley, a business tycoon extorting money from the town’s citizens under the guise of the “Jasper Improvement Society.” The Double Deuce is filled with rowdy customers, constant fighting, and a band forced to perform behind a chain link fence. As Dalton observes the situation, he notes an overly-aggressive bouncer, a waitress dealing drugs, and another bouncer who flirts with women instead of attending to his job. The band takes a break and Dalton reconnects with Cody, the blind singer. The two have crossed paths at various clubs in the country, and Cody admits this is one of the worst. Later, Tilghman reveals to his staff that he plans to improve the Double Deuce and introduces Dalton, declaring he is in charge of all bar business. Dalton fires the bad bouncers and the waitress who sold drugs. He claims the club has too many troublemakers, but that will change. The bouncers must be nice to the customers, take any problems or fights outside, and watch each other’s backs. That evening, Dalton notices Pat McGurn, the bartender, stealing money, and fires him. When he leaves for the evening, Dalton finds his tires slashed and the ... +


Frank Tilghman, owner of the Double Deuce road house in Jasper, Missouri, travels to New York City to hire legendary bouncer, Dalton, to help clean up the Double Deuce. Dalton leaves his decrepit automobile in New York and drives his Mercedes-Benz to Jasper, where he purchases another decrepit car and several tires. He rents an apartment over a barn from a local farmer named Emmet. Across the river is the mansion of Brad Wesley, a business tycoon extorting money from the town’s citizens under the guise of the “Jasper Improvement Society.” The Double Deuce is filled with rowdy customers, constant fighting, and a band forced to perform behind a chain link fence. As Dalton observes the situation, he notes an overly-aggressive bouncer, a waitress dealing drugs, and another bouncer who flirts with women instead of attending to his job. The band takes a break and Dalton reconnects with Cody, the blind singer. The two have crossed paths at various clubs in the country, and Cody admits this is one of the worst. Later, Tilghman reveals to his staff that he plans to improve the Double Deuce and introduces Dalton, declaring he is in charge of all bar business. Dalton fires the bad bouncers and the waitress who sold drugs. He claims the club has too many troublemakers, but that will change. The bouncers must be nice to the customers, take any problems or fights outside, and watch each other’s backs. That evening, Dalton notices Pat McGurn, the bartender, stealing money, and fires him. When he leaves for the evening, Dalton finds his tires slashed and the windshield broken. The next morning, he orders a new windshield from Red Webster, owner of the auto parts store, and Red laughs that Dalton might need a standing order for parts. Later, Dalton walks into Tilghman’s office and finds Pat McGurn demanding his job back. Backed by two thugs, O’Connor and Tinker, McGurn declares that his uncle, Brad Wesley, is in charge of supplying liquor to the bar, and Tilghman must rehire him and fire Dalton. McGurn pulls a knife and threatens Dalton, who disarms him and sends McGurn flying through the window. The two thugs battle Dalton and he receives a knife wound, but soon overpowers the men and has them escorted from the club. At the hospital, Dr. Elizabeth Clay treats his wound and he asks “Doc” to stop by the Double Deuce for coffee sometime. O’Connor and Tinker drive their monster truck to Wesley’s home. Wesley is furious that his nephew was not rehired and beats O’Connor for failing his assignment. Dalton stops at Red’s store and discovers that Wesley’s thugs vandalized the place. Red is angry about “being robbed” every week by Wesley’s extortion racket, but notes that every business in town pays. Dalton telephones his mentor, Wade Garrett, an older, equally legendary bouncer, and asks him about Wesley, but Garrett has not heard of the businessman. At the Double Deuce, the fence in front of the band is gone and the crowd is well-behaved. Several of Wesley’s thugs arrive, and as Dalton orders them to leave, he notices a knife protruding from a thug’s boot. He grabs the man’s leg and pulls him outside. Dalton and his bouncers fight the thugs, taking them down as Doc arrives. She and Dalton go for a cup of coffee and kiss. When Dalton returns home, O’Connor and Tinker are waiting. They take Dalton to meet Wesley, who wants to hire him. Dalton flatly refuses and leaves. Business is booming at the Double Deuce and Tilghman is happy, except that liquor is running low because Wesley will not allow distributors to deliver. Dalton promises to handle the problem. Doc stops at the club and Dalton learns she is Red’s niece. He takes her home and they make love. Doc suggests that Dalton could settle in Jasper, but he does not plan to do so. When the liquor delivery arrives at the Double Deuce, Wesley’s men attempt to stop it. As Dalton fights them, Wade Garrett arrives. He joins the fray and they defeat the thugs. That night, Red’s store is set on fire. Dalton races to help, but the building explodes as Red also arrives. When Dalton returns to the Double Deuce, Wesley and his entourage are inside. Wesley derides Red for refusing to help the town like everyone else, and introduces his newest hire, Jimmy, who taunts the other bouncers to fight him. Dalton allows his bouncers to fight, but Jimmy is highly skilled and takes them down. Jimmy challenges Wade and Dalton, but Wesley shoots his gun into the air and stops their brutal battle. As Wesley and his men leave, Jimmy threatens Dalton. Doc, Dalton, Tilghman, and local car dealer Stroudenmire try to convince Red to rebuild, but he refuses. He cannot prove Wesley set the fire and knows that the police force supports Wesley. Dalton and Doc are driving through town when they learn of trouble at Stroudenmire’s car dealership. They arrive as Wesley’s men drive their monster truck through the showroom, crushing several automobiles. Doc confronts Wesley, and he tells her to get Dalton out of town while that is still possible. Wesley declares Jasper is his town. Later, at Dalton’s place, Doc asks him to leave town for his own safety. Dalton refuses and insists Wesley should not have challenged him, because Dalton never loses a fight. They hear an explosion and run outside to find Emmet’s home on fire. Dalton runs inside to save Emmet, and they get outside just before the home is destroyed in a second explosion. Dalton spots Jimmy leaving on a motorcycle. He chases him, knocks Jimmy off the bike, and the two men fight. It is a brutal battle and when Dalton gains the upper hand, Jimmy pulls out a gun to kill him. Dalton knocks the gun aside, rips Jimmy’s throat out, and kicks his body into the water. Doc runs up, sees the dead body and walks away from Dalton. The next morning, Wesley calls as Dalton arrives at the Double Deuce and announces that he plans to kill Wade Garrett or Doc Clay, and Dalton must choose. As Dalton hangs up, Wade walks in, badly beaten. He tells Dalton to find Doc while he remains at the Double Deuce. Dalton races to the hospital and tells Doc that she must leave town with him, but she refuses and asks Dalton to leave. When he returns to the Double Deuce, Dalton discovers Wade’s body on the bar with a note from Wesley pinned to his chest with a knife. Dalton grabs the knife and heads for Wesley’s home. Wesley’s thugs are waiting and open fire as Dalton’s car speeds across the yard at them and crashes. However, Dalton is not inside the vehicle; he wedged the gas pedal with the knife used to kill Wade. The thugs search for Dalton, and he takes them down one by one. As Tinker searches Wesley’s trophy room, Dalton knocks him out. Wesley finds Dalton in the trophy room and shoots him in the shoulder. Dalton knocks the gun aside, and the two men fight. When Wesley retrieves his gun, Dalton knocks it aside again and pushes Wesley down. However, he stops himself from ripping out Wesley’s throat as Doc runs inside. Dalton steps toward her, and Wesley grabs his gun. However, Red, Stroudenmire and Tilghman arrive and shoot Wesley. They inform Wesley that this is their town, and Tilghman fires the kill shot. Red hides their weapons as police arrive. The sheriff asks what happened, but everyone insists they saw nothing. Tinker regains consciousness, assesses the situation, and declares he did not see anything, either. Dalton and Doc enjoy skinny-dipping in the river, and business at the Double Deuce flourishes. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.