Full page view
HISTORY

The opening credits of Turner & Hooch feature a montage depicting the obsessive compulsive behaviors of protagonist “Scott Turner.”
       As stated in HR production charts on 21 Mar 1989, principal photography began 23 Jan 1989 in Los Angeles and Pacific Grove, CA, with Roger Spottiswoode directing. However, a 10 Feb 1989 HR article announced that Spottiswoode was a replacement for actor-director Henry Winkler, and production was shut down on 9 Feb 1989 in the wake of an argument between Winkler and Touchstone Pictures. Winkler’s publicist told HR that the director had a different approach toward the story than the studio, but both parties agreed that he should leave the project. Filming was expected to resume 13 Feb 1989 under Spottiswoode’s direction. Another 10 Feb 1989 HR article noted that in Oct 1989, Winkler made arrangements with officials in Carmel, CA, to shoot at several locations in Apr of the same year. Although permits had been acquired through Carmel’s city council, some residents protested, claiming that their daily lives would be disrupted and cited the influx of tourists and movie fans to the town when actor-director Clint Eastwood was mayor as an example. While a 10 Feb 1989 LAT news item stated that the filmmakers were allowed to continue with their plans to shoot at outdoor locations in Carmel as planned, studio production notes from AMPAS library files reported that principal photography began 13 Feb 1989 at Terminal Island in Los Angeles, which was dressed to replicate the film’s fictional Cypress Beach Packing Plant and pier. The production moved to The ... More Less

The opening credits of Turner & Hooch feature a montage depicting the obsessive compulsive behaviors of protagonist “Scott Turner.”
       As stated in HR production charts on 21 Mar 1989, principal photography began 23 Jan 1989 in Los Angeles and Pacific Grove, CA, with Roger Spottiswoode directing. However, a 10 Feb 1989 HR article announced that Spottiswoode was a replacement for actor-director Henry Winkler, and production was shut down on 9 Feb 1989 in the wake of an argument between Winkler and Touchstone Pictures. Winkler’s publicist told HR that the director had a different approach toward the story than the studio, but both parties agreed that he should leave the project. Filming was expected to resume 13 Feb 1989 under Spottiswoode’s direction. Another 10 Feb 1989 HR article noted that in Oct 1989, Winkler made arrangements with officials in Carmel, CA, to shoot at several locations in Apr of the same year. Although permits had been acquired through Carmel’s city council, some residents protested, claiming that their daily lives would be disrupted and cited the influx of tourists and movie fans to the town when actor-director Clint Eastwood was mayor as an example. While a 10 Feb 1989 LAT news item stated that the filmmakers were allowed to continue with their plans to shoot at outdoor locations in Carmel as planned, studio production notes from AMPAS library files reported that principal photography began 13 Feb 1989 at Terminal Island in Los Angeles, which was dressed to replicate the film’s fictional Cypress Beach Packing Plant and pier. The production moved to The Walt Disney Studios lot in Burbank, CA, after twenty-two days of filming at Terminal Island, and shot on two sound stages for an additional two weeks. Principal photography continued in San Pedro, CA, and concluded after fifty-nine days of production in the city of Pacific Grove in Monterey Peninsula, CA.
       According to production notes, Beasley, the Dogue De Bordeaux canine that starred in the role of “Hooch,” was the first actor hired for the film, and the casting of animal talent before human actors was believed to be “unprecedented.” Beasley’s short five-month preparation for the role with his owner and trainer Clint Rowe was also considered unparalleled. Another Dogue De Bordeaux named Igor was cast as Beasley’s stunt double, but is not credited in the film. Production designer John DeCuir, Jr. worked closely with Rowe to make the set conducive to Beasley’s needs and to facilitate the photography of a dog. A 28 Aug 1989 People news item reported that there were less than 300 Dogues De Bordeaux in the U.S. at the time of the film’s release, and they sold for approximately $2,000.
       On 4 Aug 1989, HR reported that the picture was the U.S.’s top-grossing film its opening weekend and CinemaScore research showed that seventy-one percent of the audience was in attendance to see Tom Hanks. However, critical reception of the film was unenthusiastic. A 27 Jul 1989 HR review found the film’s “black cop/white cop” subplot clichéd and called the story “lowbrow” entertainment. The DV review published on the same day disparaged the screenwriter’s choice of “climaxing the story with a gut-wrenching act of violence that flip-flops the film from comedy to melodrama,” but noted that “the interplay between Hanks and the dog keeps the film watchable.” DV also suggested that without Hanks, the film appeared as a “telepic ripoff” of Universal Pictures’ K-9 (1989, see entry), which was released earlier that year.



Academic Network University of Washington, Seattle; student: Anagha Kulkarni [email protected]; Advisor: Jennifer M. Bean [email protected] . SBC 4/3/12. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1989
p. 2, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1989
p. 1, 82.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 May 1989
p. 26.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jul 1989
p. 4, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Feb 1989
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
28 Jul 1989
p. 7.
New York Times
28 Jul 1989
p. 8.
People
28 Aug 1989.
---
Variety
2 Aug 1989
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Raymond Wagner Production
A Roger Spottiswoode Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr, 2d unit/1st asst dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Steadicam op
Cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Asst cam, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Standby painter
Greens foreman
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Cost supv
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
Segue Music
Mus rec and mixed
Mus rec at
Mus rec at
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
ADR voice group
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley supv
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Main title des
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Casting
Extras casting
Central Casting
Monterey casting
Central Coast Production Services
Hooch owned & trained by
Animal trainer
Asst animal trainer
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Prod assoc
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Spottiswoode
Asst to Mr. Spottiswoode
Asst to Mr. Wagner
Asst to Mr. Hanks
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Mobile communications
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Also sprach Zarathustra," written by Richard Strauss, performed by Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Herman Krebbers, violin, conducted by Bernard Haitink, courtesy of Philips Records, a division of PolyGram Classics.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Turner and Hooch
Release Date:
28 July 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 July 1989
Production Date:
13 February--mid April 1989 in Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, a.a.d.o. the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
31 July 1989
Copyright Number:
PA418905
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29890
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the peaceful, port town of Cypress Beach, California, a compulsively neat and organized police investigator named Scott Turner trains his replacement, David Sutton, before his transfer to the Sacramento Police Department, where Turner hopes he will have more exciting work. At the pier, Turner introduces Sutton to seafood plant owner Walter Boyett and, across the dock, Turner visits his friend Amos Reed, a shipyard junk collector. Although Turner approaches the old man’s houseboat with trepidation, Amos’s imposing Dogue de Bordeaux, Hooch, pins Turner down by the throat. Amos claims that Hooch has affection for Turner, then complains of suspicious activity at Boyett’s plant. As Turner and Sutton drive away, they are called to Pinecone Beach, where siblings Mike and Christine Harper have discovered over $8,000 washed ashore in a plastic bag. Confiscating the money, Turner tells the children’s mother, Mrs. Kathy Harper, that the cash will belong to them if no one claims it, but they must use it for college. That night, back at the pier, Boyett orders his henchman, Zack Gregory, to kill a worker named Ferraday who stole a plastic bag filled with cash. Hearing Hooch’s barks from across the dock, Boyett sends Gregory to Amos’s houseboat, but when the old man refuses Gregory’s bribe to keep quiet, he is stabbed to death. However, Hooch witnesses the killing, jumps through a window and chases Gregory away. Early the next morning, Turner rushes to the scene of his first murder investigation and is saddened by the death of Amos. As Hooch barks from inside the houseboat where he has been confined, federal agents Harley McCabe and Jeff ... +


In the peaceful, port town of Cypress Beach, California, a compulsively neat and organized police investigator named Scott Turner trains his replacement, David Sutton, before his transfer to the Sacramento Police Department, where Turner hopes he will have more exciting work. At the pier, Turner introduces Sutton to seafood plant owner Walter Boyett and, across the dock, Turner visits his friend Amos Reed, a shipyard junk collector. Although Turner approaches the old man’s houseboat with trepidation, Amos’s imposing Dogue de Bordeaux, Hooch, pins Turner down by the throat. Amos claims that Hooch has affection for Turner, then complains of suspicious activity at Boyett’s plant. As Turner and Sutton drive away, they are called to Pinecone Beach, where siblings Mike and Christine Harper have discovered over $8,000 washed ashore in a plastic bag. Confiscating the money, Turner tells the children’s mother, Mrs. Kathy Harper, that the cash will belong to them if no one claims it, but they must use it for college. That night, back at the pier, Boyett orders his henchman, Zack Gregory, to kill a worker named Ferraday who stole a plastic bag filled with cash. Hearing Hooch’s barks from across the dock, Boyett sends Gregory to Amos’s houseboat, but when the old man refuses Gregory’s bribe to keep quiet, he is stabbed to death. However, Hooch witnesses the killing, jumps through a window and chases Gregory away. Early the next morning, Turner rushes to the scene of his first murder investigation and is saddened by the death of Amos. As Hooch barks from inside the houseboat where he has been confined, federal agents Harley McCabe and Jeff Foster attempt to muscle Turner off the case, but Turner convinces his boss, Chief Howard Hyde, to let him stay on the job an extra week so he and Sutton can find Amos’s killer. When animal control officers claim Hooch is rabid and threaten to shoot him, Turner says the dog is a witness and escorts him to the town’s new veterinarian, Emily Carson. Learning about the murder, Emily encourages Turner to take the dog home and use him to find the killer. The next day at the station, Turner reviews Amos’s autopsy report and determines by the exactness of the stab wound that the murderer was trained in the military. Chief Hyde complains that the investigation is too costly. Later, as Turner shops for dog food, Hooch wrecks his house. When Turner returns to find his order upturned, he goes after Hooch with a gun. Although Hooch runs away, he soon comes back with Emily’s pretty Collie, Camille. Turner returns the dogs to Emily’s home-based clinic, hoping to slip away without Hooch, but Emily sees him and invites him inside. They begin to fall in love. One day, Hooch spots Gregory at the wedding of Boyett’s daughter at a church across the street from the police station. As Hooch chases Gregory into his Cadillac, Turner and Sutton pursue the criminal and discover his identity through his license plate. Learning that Gregory is a former Marine who works for Boyett, Turner suspects he is Amos’s killer and asks Chief Hyde for a search warrant of Boyett’s plant. When the investigation is fruitless, Chief Hyde bids farewell to Turner and hands the case over to Sutton. Later, Turner and Emily make love and Turner decides to observe the plant through the night. He promises Emily that he will stay in town another few days. Although the stakeout is uneventful, Turner and Sutton search the plant again the next morning, this time with Hooch. Turner lets Hooch smell the bag of cash discovered by the Harper kids and the dog soon traces the scent to a box of matching plastic bags. Later, Turner investigates Gregory’s address at a local motel, leaving Hooch in the car. When Turner threatens the manager, he is held at gunpoint by Gregory. Although Gregory forces Turner into the driver’s seat of his Cadillac, Turner intentionally crashes the car into a wall and Hooch restrains Gregory by his throat. Terrified of the dog, Gregory confesses to killing Amos and discloses that Boyett is running a covert operation. After handcuffing Gregory and calling for reinforcements, Turner returns to the plant with Hooch and orders the dog to watch the back door. Just before entering the warehouse, Turner is surprised to see Chief Hyde, who claims that police are waiting nearby to back them up. Once inside, Tuner snatches Hyde’s shotgun and accuses the chief of collaborating with Boyett. Turner fires the weapon into a block of ice, revealing bags of cash hidden inside. Just then, Boyett shuts off the lights. Hyde recovers his weapon and a gunfight ensues. Meanwhile, Hooch finds his way into the building through a skylight and lunges onto Boyett as he aims at Turner, taking a bullet in his chest. Turner returns fire, shooting Boyett in the leg, but he is held up by Hyde. The police chief kills Boyett and demands that Turner keep quiet. Although Turner tries to humor his superior, Hyde cocks his gun; however, Hooch bites Hyde’s leg before he can shoot. As Turner seizes Hyde’s weapon, it discharges, killing the chief. Turner rushes Hooch to Emily’s clinic, but despite Turner’s soothing words and Emily’s attempts to save him, Hooch dies. Sometime later, Turner takes over as Cypress Beach’s police chief, marries Emily, and becomes the proud owner of a litter of puppies that Hooch sired with Camille before he died.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.