Vision Quest (1985)

R | 107 mins | Drama | 15 February 1985

Director:

Harold Becker

Writer:

Darryl Ponicsan

Producers:

Jon Peters, Peter Guber

Cinematographer:

Owen Roizman

Editor:

Maury Winetrobe

Production Designer:

Bill Malley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

The film concludes with the following voiceover, spoken by Mathew Modine as the character “Louden Swain:” “I think a lot about those six minutes with Shute, and the time I spent with Carla that season. Kuch had it right: it was a Vision Quest. But all I ever settled for was that we’re born to live and then to die, and we’ve got to do it alone, each in his own way, and I guess that’s why we gotta love those people who deserve it like there’s no tomorrow cause when you get right down to it, there isn’t.”
       End credits include the following acknowledgement: “With Special Thanks to the people of Spokane, Washington.”
       Vision Quest marked the feature film debut of actress Linda Fiorentino.
       The picture was originally planned to be directed by Sean Cunningham, and produced by Barry Beckerman, as announced in the 2 Dec 1981 Var. However, they were later replaced by director Harold Becker, and producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters, who optioned film rights to Terry Davis’ 1979 novel, Vision Quest, according to production notes in AMPAS library files.
       Referring to the picture as visionQuest, the 19 Sep 1983 HR reported principal photography was set to begin that day in Spokane, Washington, and would continue until the third week of November 1983. A 1984 release date was noted.
       According to production notes, more than 2,000 Spokane residents were used as background actors. Additionally, fifty local high school wrestlers were chosen, and they joined lead actor Matthew Modine for eight weeks of training before filming began. ... More Less

The film concludes with the following voiceover, spoken by Mathew Modine as the character “Louden Swain:” “I think a lot about those six minutes with Shute, and the time I spent with Carla that season. Kuch had it right: it was a Vision Quest. But all I ever settled for was that we’re born to live and then to die, and we’ve got to do it alone, each in his own way, and I guess that’s why we gotta love those people who deserve it like there’s no tomorrow cause when you get right down to it, there isn’t.”
       End credits include the following acknowledgement: “With Special Thanks to the people of Spokane, Washington.”
       Vision Quest marked the feature film debut of actress Linda Fiorentino.
       The picture was originally planned to be directed by Sean Cunningham, and produced by Barry Beckerman, as announced in the 2 Dec 1981 Var. However, they were later replaced by director Harold Becker, and producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters, who optioned film rights to Terry Davis’ 1979 novel, Vision Quest, according to production notes in AMPAS library files.
       Referring to the picture as visionQuest, the 19 Sep 1983 HR reported principal photography was set to begin that day in Spokane, Washington, and would continue until the third week of November 1983. A 1984 release date was noted.
       According to production notes, more than 2,000 Spokane residents were used as background actors. Additionally, fifty local high school wrestlers were chosen, and they joined lead actor Matthew Modine for eight weeks of training before filming began. Actor Michael Schoeffling reportedly needed little coaching as he had earned a college wrestling scholarship before becoming an actor, and had won a gold medal for wrestling at the 1979 European Championships in Munich, Germany.
       The 5 Dec 1983 HR announced that filming had completed.
       An Aug 1984 release date was announced in the 28 Dec 1983 MPHPD. However, nearly a year later, a news item from the 23 Oct 1984 LAHExam reported that the release had been delayed until spring of 1985 so that filmmakers could add a better musical score. According to the 12 Feb 1985 DV, the picture was scheduled to open on 15 Feb 1985.
       The Apr 1985 Box reported box-office earnings of $2.7 million after the film's first four days in 993 theaters. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Apr 1985.
---
Daily Variety
12 Sep 1983.
---
Daily Variety
12 Feb 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 1983
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 1985
p. 3, 66.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
23 Oct 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
15 Feb 1985
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
28 Dec 1983.
---
New York Times
15 Feb 1985
p. 8.
Variety
2 Dec 1981
p. 21.
Variety
6 Feb 1985
p. 19.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring:
as Louden Swain
[and]
as Kuch
Also starring:
as Louden's dad
as the Coach
as Kevin
[and]
as Elmo
+

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Guber-Peters Company production
A Harold Becker film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Asst costumer
MUSIC
Mus score comp and performed by
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Post prod sd supv
Sd mixer
Boom man
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Loc mgr
Asst to Mr. Becker
Asst to the prods
Prod secy
Tech adv
Physical consultant
Unit pub
Loc casting
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Vision Quest by Terry Davis (New York, 1979).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“Only The Young,” performed by Journey, written by Steve Perry, Neal Schon, and Jonathan Cain, produced by Mike Stone and Kevin Elson, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Hungry For Heaven,” performed by Dio, music by Ronnie James Dio and Jimmy Bain, lyrics by Ronnie James Dio, produced by Ronnie James Dio
“I’ll Fall In Love Again,” performed by Sammy Hagar, written by Sammy Hagar, produced by Keith Olsen, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
“Only The Young,” performed by Journey, written by Steve Perry, Neal Schon, and Jonathan Cain, produced by Mike Stone and Kevin Elson, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Hungry For Heaven,” performed by Dio, music by Ronnie James Dio and Jimmy Bain, lyrics by Ronnie James Dio, produced by Ronnie James Dio
“I’ll Fall In Love Again,” performed by Sammy Hagar, written by Sammy Hagar, produced by Keith Olsen, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Hot Blooded,” performed by Foreigner, written by Lou Gramm and Mick Jones, produced by Keith Olsen, Mick Jones, and Ian McDonald, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Harden My Heart,” performed by Quarterflash, written by Marv Ross, produced by John Boylan, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Two Sides Of Love,” performed by Sammy Hagar, written by Sammy Hagar, produced by Ted Templeman, published by Warner Bros. Music Corp./Nine Music, from the album “VOA,” courtesy of Geffen Records, by special arrangement
“Gambler,” written and performed by Madonna, produced by Phil Ramone
“Crazy For You,” performed by Madonna, music by Jon Lind, lyrics by John Bettis, produced by Phil Ramone
“Lunatic Fringe,” performed by Red Rider, written by Tom Cochrane, produced by Richard Landis, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
“The Four Seasons/Summer,” composed by Antonio Vivaldi, performed by Jan Tomasow/I Sousti Di Zagreb/Antonio Janigro, conductor, courtesy of Vanguard Records
“Change,” performed by John Waite, written by Holly Knight, produced by Neil Geraldo, courtesy of Chrysalis Records
“Shout To The Top,” performed by The Style Council, written by Paul Weller, produced by Paul Weller, courtesy of Polydor Limited and Geffen Records
“She’s On The Zoom,” performed by Don Henley, written by Don Henley and Danny Kortchmar, produced by Don Henley, Danny Kortchmar, and Greg Ladanyi, courtesy of Geffen Records
“No More Words,” performed by Berlin, written by John Crawford, produced by Giorgio Moroder and Richie Zito, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
visionQuest
Visionquest
Release Date:
15 February 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 Feb 1985
Production Date:
19 Sep--late Nov 1983
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 May 1985
Copyright Number:
PA252454
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27474
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Eighteen-year-old Louden Swain is determined to make history at his Thompson High School wrestling team. His coach chastises him for attempting to wrestle at a much lower weight class, but after a successful spar with his teammate, Kuch, Louden dedicates himself to lose even more weight. He tells Kuch that his secret goal is to wrestle a rival named Shute, who is twenty-pounds lighter. Kuch reveals Louden’s plan to the school, and, pretending to be Native-American, Kuch insists that Louden is on a “vision quest” to find his “place in the circle.” Sometime later, Louden visit his mechanic father, Larry, at the car dealership where he works, and arrives after a scuffle between a salesman and a streetwise customer named Carla, who accused the salesman of selling her a “lemon.” Believing Carla was exploited, Larry punched his co-worker. He sends Louden to take the feisty young woman out for a hamburger, and Carla reveals that she used all her savings to buy the car to drive cross-country to San Francisco, California. Louden is smitten with the tough-talking woman, and asks his father if Carla can stay with them until her car is repaired. She hesitantly accepts the offer. Louden resumes his strict training, and, over time, Carla drops her guard. She confides to Louden that she is moving to San Francisco in hopes of being an artist. Sometime later, Louden sizes up his rival, Shute, and watches him carry a log up a flight of stairs as part of his training. At the hotel where Louden works as a room-service attendant, he tells his co-worker, Elmo, he is ... +


Eighteen-year-old Louden Swain is determined to make history at his Thompson High School wrestling team. His coach chastises him for attempting to wrestle at a much lower weight class, but after a successful spar with his teammate, Kuch, Louden dedicates himself to lose even more weight. He tells Kuch that his secret goal is to wrestle a rival named Shute, who is twenty-pounds lighter. Kuch reveals Louden’s plan to the school, and, pretending to be Native-American, Kuch insists that Louden is on a “vision quest” to find his “place in the circle.” Sometime later, Louden visit his mechanic father, Larry, at the car dealership where he works, and arrives after a scuffle between a salesman and a streetwise customer named Carla, who accused the salesman of selling her a “lemon.” Believing Carla was exploited, Larry punched his co-worker. He sends Louden to take the feisty young woman out for a hamburger, and Carla reveals that she used all her savings to buy the car to drive cross-country to San Francisco, California. Louden is smitten with the tough-talking woman, and asks his father if Carla can stay with them until her car is repaired. She hesitantly accepts the offer. Louden resumes his strict training, and, over time, Carla drops her guard. She confides to Louden that she is moving to San Francisco in hopes of being an artist. Sometime later, Louden sizes up his rival, Shute, and watches him carry a log up a flight of stairs as part of his training. At the hotel where Louden works as a room-service attendant, he tells his co-worker, Elmo, he is in love with Carla. However, Carla remains distant. When she sketches a picture of Louden, he is flattered. Carla sees Louden at a bar and asks him to dance, but he is disappointed to learn she is on a double date. At school, Louden collapses from dehydration. As he recovers, he tells his English teacher, Mr. Tanneran, that he is in love with Carla. Worried about Louden’s health, Carla visits him during wrestling practice and causes a stir amongst his teammates, but he is discouraged when she compares him to a stepbrother. Louden’s coach disapproves of his rigorous training, and forbids him from losing any more weight. However, Louden impresses his teammates by reaching the top of a climbing peg board, and the coach allows the boy to continue training. Sometime later, Louden suffers a nosebleed and worries if he can continue. He sees Carla on a date with Mr. Tanneran and feels betrayed. When Carla confronts Louden about giving her the “silent treatment,” he pushes her on the bed and orders her to have sex with him. She curses, but forgives his behavior. Louden visits Kuch at home, and sees him slapped and berated by his alcoholic father. Afterward, Louden consoles his friend and shares the story of his own mother, who left the family. Kuch confesses that he lied about being Native-American. Carla attends a wrestling match and cheers Louden on, but he is forced to forfeit when he suffers an uncontrollable nosebleed. Afterward, his nemesis, Shute, tries to intimidate him. Carla takes Louden out for coffee, and he asks her to stay in town. When he acquiesces to her relationship with his teacher, she kisses him. In time, Louden’s nosebleeds continue, and his father insists he take a break from training and visit his grandfather out of town. Carla offers to join him on the road trip. While camping, Louden admits he is a virgin, and Carla confesses that she and Louden’s teacher, Tanneran, are only friends. The next day, Carla kisses Louden and they make love. Afterward, Louden wonders aloud why he cares so much about beating Shute, but Carla encourages him to confront his rival. Sometime later, Louden returns from school to find Carla gone. He is distraught, and nearly misses his long-awaited weigh-in at his match with Shute. He arrives at the last minute and learns he has hit his target weight of 168 pounds. Before the match, Carla finds him alone in the locker room, and apologizes for hurting him, explaining she left because she thought she was a distraction. When Louden tells her he has no regrets, Carla emboldens him to win the match. Louden’s friends cheer him on during the tense bout with Shute. He suffers a nosebleed in the final seconds, but his coach gives him a pep talk. In the end, Louden wins, and the crowd cheers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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