On Trial (1939)

61-62 or 65 mins | Drama | 1 April 1939

Director:

Terry Morse

Writer:

Don Ryan

Cinematographer:

L. W. O'Connell

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title for this film was The Strickland Case . According to a contemporary news item, On Trial originally was set for direction by William McGann. Information contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that the PCA informed Warner Bros. in Dec 1938 that the final script was "unacceptable from the point of view of the Production Code, for the reason that it repeatedly treats the subject of illicit sex with objectionable detail, and without compensating moral values." In addition, the PCA noted that the "objection refers to the details of those portions of the story characterizing Trask as an habitual adulterer and the detailed showing of Mrs. Strickland's relationship with Trask."
       Other films based on Rice's play, both of which also were entitled On Trial , include a 1917 Essanay film directed by James Young and starring Barbara Castleton and Sydney Ainsworth and a 1928 Warner Bros. film, directed by Archie Mayo and starring Pauline Frederick and Bert Lytell (see entries ... More Less

The working title for this film was The Strickland Case . According to a contemporary news item, On Trial originally was set for direction by William McGann. Information contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that the PCA informed Warner Bros. in Dec 1938 that the final script was "unacceptable from the point of view of the Production Code, for the reason that it repeatedly treats the subject of illicit sex with objectionable detail, and without compensating moral values." In addition, the PCA noted that the "objection refers to the details of those portions of the story characterizing Trask as an habitual adulterer and the detailed showing of Mrs. Strickland's relationship with Trask."
       Other films based on Rice's play, both of which also were entitled On Trial , include a 1917 Essanay film directed by James Young and starring Barbara Castleton and Sydney Ainsworth and a 1928 Warner Bros. film, directed by Archie Mayo and starring Pauline Frederick and Bert Lytell (see entries above). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Mar 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Apr 39
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 39
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
14-Dec-38
---
Motion Picture Daily
24 Mar 39
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Feb 39
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Mar 39
p. 41.
New York Times
5 Apr 39
p. 31.
Variety
29 Mar 39
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play On Trial by Elmer L. Rice (New York, 19 Aug 1914).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Strickland Case
Release Date:
1 April 1939
Production Date:
began 27 December 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 April 1939
Copyright Number:
LP8740
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
61-62 or 65
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4985
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Robert Strickland, a young businessman on trial for the murder of Gerald Trask, makes no effort to defend himself or cooperate with Arbuckle, his young and inexperienced attorney. He also shows no sign of distress as the prosecution recounts for the jury how he murdered the wealthy businessman, who apparently caught him burglarizing his home. When Gerald's wife Joan is called to the witness stand, she testifies that prior to the murder she witnessed Glover, her husband's secretary, putting a large sum of money in the living room safe. After that, she tells the jury, she answered a strange telephone call from an unidentified woman who asked to speak with her husband. Joan also informs the court that she had recently asked her husband for a divorce because of his deceitful ways, and that while she was on the phone, someone entered her home and grabbed her from behind. Gerald rushed to her aid, but he was shot by the assailant. Glover, the next witness to testify, confirms Joan's story and adds that Robert struck him with a cane to get the card with the combination of the safe from him. Robert's fate appears to be sealed by the evidence against him until the judge allows Doris, Robert's six-year-old daughter, to take the stand. Her testimony about her mother's unusual behavior at home on that particular day implicates her mother Mae in the crime. Doris says that she witnessed her mother anguishing over the loss of her purse that afternoon, and that she lied to Robert when a man delivered her purse and Robert found Gerald's address inside it. Doris ... +


Robert Strickland, a young businessman on trial for the murder of Gerald Trask, makes no effort to defend himself or cooperate with Arbuckle, his young and inexperienced attorney. He also shows no sign of distress as the prosecution recounts for the jury how he murdered the wealthy businessman, who apparently caught him burglarizing his home. When Gerald's wife Joan is called to the witness stand, she testifies that prior to the murder she witnessed Glover, her husband's secretary, putting a large sum of money in the living room safe. After that, she tells the jury, she answered a strange telephone call from an unidentified woman who asked to speak with her husband. Joan also informs the court that she had recently asked her husband for a divorce because of his deceitful ways, and that while she was on the phone, someone entered her home and grabbed her from behind. Gerald rushed to her aid, but he was shot by the assailant. Glover, the next witness to testify, confirms Joan's story and adds that Robert struck him with a cane to get the card with the combination of the safe from him. Robert's fate appears to be sealed by the evidence against him until the judge allows Doris, Robert's six-year-old daughter, to take the stand. Her testimony about her mother's unusual behavior at home on that particular day implicates her mother Mae in the crime. Doris says that she witnessed her mother anguishing over the loss of her purse that afternoon, and that she lied to Robert when a man delivered her purse and Robert found Gerald's address inside it. Doris also states that her father forced her mother to confess her affair with Gerald, the man to whom Robert owed $20,000, which Robert planned to repay that evening. Doris concludes her testimony with the revelation that when her mother phoned Gerald to warn him that Robert was on his way, she screamed "he killed him!" into the phone. When Mae is called as a witness, she states that Gerald was a womanizer who arranged a fake marriage between them and was then caught by his wife. She also says that years later he blackmailed her into continuing the illicit affair with threats of ruining Robert's business. Though Mae requests that she be the one to take the blame for her husband murdering the man who tormented her, the jury acquits her and Robert when it is revealed that Glover stole the $20,000 that Robert had brought to the house. Following the acquittal, the Strickland family is joyfully reunited. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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