Quigley Down Under (1990)

PG-13 | 120 mins | Western | 19 October 1990

Director:

Simon Wincer

Writer:

John Hill

Cinematographer:

David Eggby

Editor:

Peter Burgess

Production Designer:

Ross Major

Production Company:

Pathé Entertainment
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HISTORY

       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files and the 5 Dec 1989 HR, principal photography began 18 Sep 1989 in Alice Springs, the first of fifty-one Australian Northern Territory locations. Three months later, the 18 Dec 1989 DV noted that filming had recently finished. The “Marston Station” was built for $1 million as a copy of a 19th century “station,” or ranch, with animal pens, stables, outbuildings, and homestead house. The fishing village was a museum replica of an 1860 port town in Meekathanga on the shores of Apollo Bay, Victoria. The port city of Warrnambool in Victoria stood in for Fremantle. An “Old West” expert, Jerry Croft from South Dakota, supplied the Western gear owned by “Matthew Quigley.” Most of the cast and crew, including director Simon Wincer, were Australians.
       Writer John Hill originally developed the script for Quigley Down Under in 1984 as a Warner Bros. project, and the studio reactivated the project two years later, the 27 Jun 1990 HR and 15 Oct 1990 DV reported. Though Warner Bros. lost the project to Pathé Entertainment, it picked up the finished film for a summer 1990 release. However, the deal fell apart, and MGM /UA “inherited” the movie.
       The film’s original director, Lewis Gilbert, left after several rewrites and a budget reduction from AUS$40 million to AUS$20 million, the 27 Jan 1987 HR reported. The 16 Dec 1989 TV Week estimated the film cost (U.S.) $15 million.
       Quigley Down Under grossed a “reliable $11 million” over its first three weekends, according to the Dec 1990 Box. ... More Less

       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files and the 5 Dec 1989 HR, principal photography began 18 Sep 1989 in Alice Springs, the first of fifty-one Australian Northern Territory locations. Three months later, the 18 Dec 1989 DV noted that filming had recently finished. The “Marston Station” was built for $1 million as a copy of a 19th century “station,” or ranch, with animal pens, stables, outbuildings, and homestead house. The fishing village was a museum replica of an 1860 port town in Meekathanga on the shores of Apollo Bay, Victoria. The port city of Warrnambool in Victoria stood in for Fremantle. An “Old West” expert, Jerry Croft from South Dakota, supplied the Western gear owned by “Matthew Quigley.” Most of the cast and crew, including director Simon Wincer, were Australians.
       Writer John Hill originally developed the script for Quigley Down Under in 1984 as a Warner Bros. project, and the studio reactivated the project two years later, the 27 Jun 1990 HR and 15 Oct 1990 DV reported. Though Warner Bros. lost the project to Pathé Entertainment, it picked up the finished film for a summer 1990 release. However, the deal fell apart, and MGM /UA “inherited” the movie.
       The film’s original director, Lewis Gilbert, left after several rewrites and a budget reduction from AUS$40 million to AUS$20 million, the 27 Jan 1987 HR reported. The 16 Dec 1989 TV Week estimated the film cost (U.S.) $15 million.
       Quigley Down Under grossed a “reliable $11 million” over its first three weekends, according to the Dec 1990 Box.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “The producers would like to thank Shiloh Rifle Manufacturing Co., Big Timber, Montana, for the creation of Quigley’s rifle.” Also, “The producers gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the Conservation Commission of the Northern Territory, Australia; Northern Territory Tourism Commission; Ross River Homestead; Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum, Warrnambool, Australia.”

      The film begins with the following title card: “Fremantle, Western Australia.” End credits give the following information: “Filmed on location at Alice Springs, Northern Territory; Warrnambool, Apollo Bay; and Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Dec 1990.
---
Daily Variety
18 Dec 1989
p. 3.
Daily Variety
15 Oct 1990
p. 2, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 1990
p. 5, 29.
Los Angeles Times
19 Oct 1990
p. 13.
New York Times
19 Oct 1990
p. 14.
Screen International
3 Nov 1990.
---
TV Week
16 Dec 1989.
---
Variety
17 Dec 1986
p. 107.
Variety
9 Aug 1989
p. 33.
Variety
27 Sep 1989
p. 47.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Pathé Entertainment Presents
A Simon Wincer Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
Unit mgr, 2d unit
Asst unit mgr
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Steadicam op
Still photog
Cam maintenance
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Focus puller, 2d unit
Clapper loader, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Generator op
[Photog equip provided by]
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Draughtsman
Storyboard artist/Glass paintings
Art dept buyer
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst ed
Post prod supv
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop
Prop buyer
Prop buyer
Prop buyer
Quigley's saddlery and leather apparel
Armorer
Armorer
Armorer
Const supv
Scenic artist
Const mgr
Const mgr
Lead carpenter
Standby carpenter
Set finisher
Set finisher
Set finisher
COSTUMES
Mr. Selleck's and Ms. San Giacomo's ward des by
Addl cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Standby dresser
Ward buyer
Asst standby dresser
Ward asst
Cost cutter
Military uniforms by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
End titles
Opticals
Opticals
MAKEUP
Mr. Selleck's and Ms. San Giacomo's makeup
Makeup supv
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod supv
Casting
Casting
U.S. casting consultant
Horsemaster
Projectionist
Prod coord
Cost controller
Accounts
Accounts asst
Accounts asst
Asst to Ms. Rose
Asst to Mr. Selleck
Aboriginal liaison
Aboriginal liaison
Aboriginal liaison
Aboriginal liaison
Unit pub (U.S.)
Unit pub (Australia)
Prod secy
Post prod facilities
Post prod facilities
Transportation coord
Extra casting
Catering
Safety officer
Unit asst
Unit asst
Unit asst
Unit asst
Unit asst
Unit asst
Unit asst
Animal trainer
Animal handler
Animal handler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Bullock wrangler
Stable girl
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Asst stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 October 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 19 October 1990
Production Date:
18 September--mid December 1989
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR® in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
120
Length(in feet):
10,817
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Countries:
Australia, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30369
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the late nineteenth century, Wyoming cowboy Matthew Quigley sails to Fremantle, Western Australia, at the behest of cattle baron Elliott Marston. At the dock, he gets into a fight with Coogan, Whitey, and Hobb, three men who are trying to force an hysterical American woman named “Crazy Cora” into their wagon. When Cora runs behind Quigley and calls him “Roy,” he tells her his name is Matthew Quigley. Hearing his name, Coogan announces they are the ones Elliott Marston sent to pick him up. They ride for several days in an oxen-pulled wagon. At one point, they stop for a detachment of Major Ashley-Pitt’s British cavalry soldiers, who are looking for a cattle thief. When the wagon finally arrives at the ranch, Quigley demands that Marston pay the “$50 in gold coin” he was promised for simply showing up. Since Quigley boasted on his job application that he could shoot a target 900 yards away, Elliott Marston requests a demonstration. Quigley pulls his .45-caliber, thirty-four-inch-barrel, Sharps rifle from its leather sleeve. Testing the wind, he affixes a scope and fires at a distant bucket, hitting it three times. Mr. Dobkin, one of Marston’s men, brings in two British army deserters from Ashley-Pitt’s unit. Assuring the men they will be sent back for court martial and certain death, Marston tells Dobkin to cut their bonds, knowing the men will try to grab their captors’ weapons. When the deserters react, Marston shoots them with his Colt .45. He invites Quigley for dinner. At the table, Marston reveals himself to be a fan of the American West who prides himself on being handy with a Colt pistol, but Quigley has no ... +


In the late nineteenth century, Wyoming cowboy Matthew Quigley sails to Fremantle, Western Australia, at the behest of cattle baron Elliott Marston. At the dock, he gets into a fight with Coogan, Whitey, and Hobb, three men who are trying to force an hysterical American woman named “Crazy Cora” into their wagon. When Cora runs behind Quigley and calls him “Roy,” he tells her his name is Matthew Quigley. Hearing his name, Coogan announces they are the ones Elliott Marston sent to pick him up. They ride for several days in an oxen-pulled wagon. At one point, they stop for a detachment of Major Ashley-Pitt’s British cavalry soldiers, who are looking for a cattle thief. When the wagon finally arrives at the ranch, Quigley demands that Marston pay the “$50 in gold coin” he was promised for simply showing up. Since Quigley boasted on his job application that he could shoot a target 900 yards away, Elliott Marston requests a demonstration. Quigley pulls his .45-caliber, thirty-four-inch-barrel, Sharps rifle from its leather sleeve. Testing the wind, he affixes a scope and fires at a distant bucket, hitting it three times. Mr. Dobkin, one of Marston’s men, brings in two British army deserters from Ashley-Pitt’s unit. Assuring the men they will be sent back for court martial and certain death, Marston tells Dobkin to cut their bonds, knowing the men will try to grab their captors’ weapons. When the deserters react, Marston shoots them with his Colt .45. He invites Quigley for dinner. At the table, Marston reveals himself to be a fan of the American West who prides himself on being handy with a Colt pistol, but Quigley has no use for pistols. He wonders why he was brought thousands of miles to shoot wild dingoes for ten pounds a month when Marston has dozens of men. With his aged Australian Aborigine servant standing quietly nearby, Marston explains that Aborigines slaughtered his parents, and now they slaughter his sheep and cattle. However, they keep out of normal rifle range, and that is the real reason he brought Quigley to Australia. Outraged, the American throws his host through the front door. Marston orders his ranch hands into the house to get him, but the old Aborigine knocks Quigley unconscious from behind. Marston’s men drag him outside and beat him. When Crazy Cora intercedes, Coogan hits her in the face. Marston orders him to put Quigley and Cora on a buckboard, take them far into the outback, and dump them. A day or so later, Coogan and Miller throw the two Americans on the ground, and as they prepare to leave, Quigley offers to trade his gold coin for water. Having already commandeered Quigley’s rifle and bandolier, Coogan decides to take the coin, too, but Quigley pulls a knife from his boot and stabs him. As Miller hurries away, Quigley grabs the rifle and shoots him off the buckboard. However, the horses keep running. When Cora comments that things do not always go well on a new job, they laugh together, then begin a trek through the desert. Later, at Marston Station, Major Ashley-Pitt’s troops arrive with the bodies of Coogan and Miller. Meanwhile, Aborigines find Quigley and Cora unconscious and give them water to drink and bugs to eat. Cora befriends several of the women and a little girl. To Quigley, she compares the Aborigines to Comanche Indians back home, and recounts how Comanches came to her home one night when her husband, Roy, was gone. Hiding with her baby, Cora accidentally smothered the boy trying to keep him from crying. The Comanches found her anyway, but were drunk and meant her no harm. When Roy returned, he buried the baby, took Cora to Galveston, Texas, and put her on a boat, declaring he did not want a woman who would kill his son. In the morning, Quigley and Cora awaken as the Aborigines leave, then see Marston’s men approaching on horseback. As the ranchers shoot at the natives, Cora runs toward the little girl, who has fallen. Using his rifle, Quigley shoots three of Marston’s men. An Aborigine spears another, and only one rider escapes. Realizing that Marston will soon know where they are, Quigley captures one of the horses and rides away with Cora. That night, she wants to cuddle with Quigley, but he refuses until she stops calling him Roy. When Elliott Marston learns that Quigley shot most of his men, he offers Dobkin, O’Flynn, and other hired hands a substantial reward to bring him back. Meanwhile, Quigley and Cora come upon several of Marston’s other men chasing Aborigines toward a cliff. Quigley shoots a couple of the men off their horses, and the others ride away, but not before several Aborigines fall to their deaths. Crying over the loss of Aborigine life, Cora runs to the bottom of the cliff and discovers that a baby boy has survived. Quigley approaches the wounded Hobb, one of the three men who met him in Freemantle. With his back broken and no chance of survival, Hobb agrees to point Quigley to the nearest town in return for his gun, so that he can shoot himself before the dingoes get him. Later, Quigley leaves Cora and the baby in a cave with food, water, and a gun, and promises to be back in two days. He rides to a small fishing village, enters Grimmelman’s General Store, and befriends the German immigrant proprietor. Grimmelman trades with local Aborigines and knows Elliott Marston is a murderer. Mrs. Grimmelman packs dried meat and condensed milk for Quigley to take back to Cora and the baby. Quigley is surprised to discover from Grimmelman’s son, Klaus, that Aborigines are already talking about a “spirit warrior” with a long rifle. Outside, two of Marston’s men see Klaus Grimmelman saddling Quigley’s horse, grab the boy, and round up their search party. Meanwhile, as dingoes approach, Cora puts her hand over the crying baby’s mouth, but pulls it away and tells the baby to cry as loud as it wants. She fires her guns to frighten off the wild dogs. Matthew Quigley senses something wrong outside the general store. He evades Marston’s men and crashes through a hotel window, but a henchman’s stray bullet knocks over an oil lamp and sets the place on fire. Quigley escapes the inferno through a skylight and jumps to the next roof. He shoots three of Marston’s men, but when he returns to the store, Mrs. Grimmelman is dead from a stray bullet. Pulling Marston’s last man off his horse, Quigley tells him to ride back to the ranch and inform Marston he is coming for him. Quigley returns to the cave to find Cora and the baby alive, surrounded by dead dingoes. Along with food, he brings her a new dress and hat. They return to the village together, where Grimmelman arranges for Cora to give the baby to an Aboriginal family. Saying goodbye, Quigley returns to Marston Station and sends the horse into the compound with a note telling Marston’s men they can leave safely before dawn. Anticipating a night attack, Marston keeps the men awake, while Quigley lays booby traps in the nearby hills. In the morning, Quigley picks off two of Marston’s men, and when others chase after him into the hills, he scatters them with rolling logs and kills them. However, O’Flynn and Dobkin wound him. They tie Quigley to a horse and drag him into the compound. Marston orders them to put a Colt pistol in the American’s belt, then orders Quigley to draw. Quigley pulls the pistol and shoots all three. To the dying Marston, Quigley explains that what he said at dinner was that he never had much use for a Colt, not that he did not know how to use one. The old Aborigine servant returns the rifle to Quigley, then rips off his European clothes and walks into the hills to join other Aborigines. When Ashley-Pitt and his soldiers arrive with a warrant for Quigley’s arrest, a dust storm blows up, and hundreds of Aborigines, led by the old man, appear with spears on the hilltops. The British turn and leave without Quigley, and the natives disappear as quickly as they appeared. At a port city, Quigley prepares to book a ship back to America. The booking clerk, holding a gun and looking at a reward poster for Matthew Quigley under his desk, asks his name. As Cora suddenly appears, Quigley gives his name as Roy Cobb, and the clerk lays down his gun. Outside, Cora calls him Matthew Quigley, and they kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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