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HISTORY

RoboCop 2 is the sequel to 1987’s successful RoboCop (see entry). Lead actors Peter Weller and Nancy Allen returned for their roles as “RoboCop” and his police partner “Anne Lewis.” Supporting actors Daniel O’Herlihy and Felton Perry reprised their roles as the "Old Man,” the head of Omni Consumer Products (OPC), and his right hand man, “Donald Johnson,” while Robert Do’Qui also returned as “Sgt. Reed.”
       Three weeks after RoboCop opened in Jul 1987 to critical and public acclaim, Orion Pictures announced plans for a sequel. The 6 Aug 1987 HR reported that the sequel would be “funnier, more satirical, and less violent.” Orion did not have a script or director yet, but hoped to begin production in late fall 1987.
       Months later, the 30 Mar 1989 LAHExam reported that actor Peter Weller was not willing to return to the title role and Orion was looking for a replacement. However, Weller later agreed to star in the sequel. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate that the actor worked for six months with New York mime coach Moni Yakim, learning body language that would be “mechanical yet graceful and expressive” for RoboCop’s movements.
       Tim Hunter was set to direct the sequel, the 28 May 1989 LAT reported, but he was soon replaced by veteran director Irvin Kershner, according to the 2 Jun 1989 LAT.
       Acclaimed comic book writer Frank Miller, best known at the time for the graphic novel Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, devised the story and made his screenwriting debut, co-writing with Walon Green. Miller told the ... More Less

RoboCop 2 is the sequel to 1987’s successful RoboCop (see entry). Lead actors Peter Weller and Nancy Allen returned for their roles as “RoboCop” and his police partner “Anne Lewis.” Supporting actors Daniel O’Herlihy and Felton Perry reprised their roles as the "Old Man,” the head of Omni Consumer Products (OPC), and his right hand man, “Donald Johnson,” while Robert Do’Qui also returned as “Sgt. Reed.”
       Three weeks after RoboCop opened in Jul 1987 to critical and public acclaim, Orion Pictures announced plans for a sequel. The 6 Aug 1987 HR reported that the sequel would be “funnier, more satirical, and less violent.” Orion did not have a script or director yet, but hoped to begin production in late fall 1987.
       Months later, the 30 Mar 1989 LAHExam reported that actor Peter Weller was not willing to return to the title role and Orion was looking for a replacement. However, Weller later agreed to star in the sequel. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate that the actor worked for six months with New York mime coach Moni Yakim, learning body language that would be “mechanical yet graceful and expressive” for RoboCop’s movements.
       Tim Hunter was set to direct the sequel, the 28 May 1989 LAT reported, but he was soon replaced by veteran director Irvin Kershner, according to the 2 Jun 1989 LAT.
       Acclaimed comic book writer Frank Miller, best known at the time for the graphic novel Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, devised the story and made his screenwriting debut, co-writing with Walon Green. Miller told the 10 - 17 Oct 1990 issue of Time Out (London) that he wrote eight drafts of the script and was busy rewriting scenes on the set, with actors sometimes getting new lines ten minutes before filming. As a result of the last-minute script changes, Miller noted that several plot points were never fully developed, including “RoboCop’s” relationship with his wife, and the effect that the drug, “Nuke,” had on its users. Miller also had an unbilled cameo in the movie as the scientist devising a new formula for Nuke.
       Principal photography began on 13 Jul 1989 in Houston, TX, according to a 13 Oct 1989 DV production chart. Although Dallas, TX, was used for locations on the first film, Houston was selected for the sequel because it combined industrial buildings with a futuristic skyline, according to promotional materials. The Wortham Theater Center was used for the exterior of the futuristic “Civic Centrum,” while the George Brown Convention Center was used for the interiors. The abandoned Jefferson Davis Hospital served as “Cain’s” laboratory, and the Cullen Center was used for the OPC offices. The film had a three-month shooting schedule, according to Time Out. The 9 Apr 1990 DV reported that Irvin Kershner finished the shoot five days ahead of schedule.
       RoboCop 2 was budgeted at $25-30 million, based on estimates from the 11 Jun 1990 People magazine and the 22 Jun 1990 DV, respectively. The 27 Oct 1989 HR reported the production contributed $8 million to the Texas economy, making it the second largest production ever filmed in the state at that time.
       RoboCop 2 opened 22 Jun 1990 on 1,768 screens, grossing $25.8 million in its first ten days of release, according to the Aug 1990 Box. Although producers opted for the simple title of RoboCop 2, several other titles were considered. The 13 Mar 1988 LAT reported that Orion had registered the title RoboCop II: This Cyborg Is for Hire with the MPAA. The 18 Jun 1989 LAT stated that Orion had also registered RoboCop II: The Battle for Detroit and RoboCop: The Drug Wars.
       In 1993, another sequel, RoboCop 3 was released, and in 2014, a remake of the original movie was produced starring actor Joel Kinnaman as “Alex Murphy/RoboCop” (see entries).
       End credits state: “The Producers wish to acknowledge the following for their help: The City of Houston; Rick Ferguson; Lisa Graziano; AV Technology, Inc.; Certain material © Apple Computer, Inc. used with permission; Jordy Tollett, Director Civic Center Department; Myrias Computer Corporation; Northgate Computer Systems, Inc.; Uniden Corporation of America; Prime Time Marketing, Inc.; Larry Waterman, Proton; Location lighting & grip equipment supplied by Lee America West; Moviecam Cameras and Lenses provided by Ultravision; Cinema Truck of Texas; Joe Turnbough, Stardust Productions; Product design by Image Design, Hal Berger; Alex Pietersen; Daniel Paul; Lope de Vargas”; “Pre-recorded videotape supplied by CNN © Cable News Network, Inc. 1989. All rights reserved.”


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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Aug 1990.
---
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1989.
---
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1990
p. 2, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 1987
p. 1, 5.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1989
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1990
p. 6, 55.
Long Beach [CA] Press-Telegram
20 Jun 1990
p. A-8.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
30 Mar 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Mar 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 May 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1990
p. 1.
New York Times
22 Jun 1990
p. 12.
People
11 Jun 1990.
---
Premier
Jul 1990
p. 62-66.
Time Out (London)
10-17 Oct 1990
p. 14-15.
Variety
20 Jun 1990
p. 29.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring:
Daniel O'Herlihy
Tom Noonan
Co-starring:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Film by Irvin Kershner
A Jon Davison Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, The 2d unit
1st asst dir, The 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Focus
Clapper/Loader
Still photog
B cam op
Gaffer
Best boy
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video playback
2d unit dir of photog
Cam op, The 2d unit
1st asst cam, The 2d unit
1st asst cam, The 2d unit
2d asst cam, The 2d unit
Gaffer, The 2d unit
Best boy, The 2d unit
Key grip, The 2d unit
Best boy grip, The 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Robocop des and created by
Art dir
Illustrator
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
Head scenic artist
Scenic artist
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
Film ed
Film ed
Video editor
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Video prod
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Lead person
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst props
Asst props
Weapons master
Asst weapons
Const coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Metal fabricator
Head scenic artist
Scenic artist
Const office coord
Future city model
Prop master, The 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
RoboCop cost
Cost supv
Key costumer
Ward asst
Ward asst
Costumer, The 2d unit
Costumer, The 2d unit
MUSIC
Mus composed and cond by
Mus supv
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Mus contractor
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
ADR/Dial supv
ADR ed
ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd eff rec
Foley
Foley
Foley mixer
Sd eff transfer
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
ADR mixer
ADR group coord
Sd mixer, The 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photographic eff
Matte painitngs
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Computer graphics supv
Computer graphics
Computer graphics system
FX art dir, Robot monster crew
FX prod supv, Robot monster crew
Vis eff, Robot monster crew
Vis eff, Robot monster crew
Vis eff, Robot monster crew
Vista vision cam, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Stop motion anim, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Cam asst, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Model maker, Robot monster crew
Supv, Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
Miniature set const, Robot monster crew
FX cam, Robot monster crew
FX cam, Robot monster crew
FX ed, Robot monster crew
Armature machinist, Robot monster crew
Armature machinist, Robot monster crew
Mold maker, Robot monster crew
Asst mold maker, Robot monster crew
Opticals, Robot monster crew
Opticals, Robot monster crew
Opticals, Robot monster crew
Eng, Robot monster crew
Electronics, Robot monster crew
FX prod coord, Robot monster crew
FX prod coord, Robot monster crew
Accountant, Robot monster crew
FX prod asst, Robot monster crew
FX prod asst, Robot monster crew
FX prod asst, Robot monster crew
FX prod asst, Robot monster crew
RoboCop 2 wrangler, Robot monster crew
Monster movement, Robot monster crew
Monster movement, Robot monster crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Rob Bottin Productions Crew
Project coord
Project coord
Roboteam chief
Roboteam shop mgr
Roboteam painter
Roboteam painter
Roboteam dresser
Roboteam dresser
Roboteam dresser
Roboteam dresser
Roboteam dresser
Roboteam dresser
RoboCop prosthetic applied by
Digital character performance by
Tech supv, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Modeling, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Computer puppeteering, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Asst tech supv, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Prod, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Prod, deGraf/Wahrman, Inc.
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Opt eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Anim cam, VCE, Inc. crew
Eff amin, VCE, Inc. crew
Macintosh anim, VCE, Inc. crew
Macintosh anim, VCE, Inc. crew
Stage eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Stage eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Stage eff, VCE, Inc. crew
Eff ed, VCE, Inc. crew
Eff ed, VCE, Inc. crew
Admin, VCE, Inc. crew
RoboCop stunt suits
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Chris Walas, Inc. crew
Optical wrangler
Title des
MAKEUP
Makeup & hair supv
Makeup & hair
Makeup & hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Robo movement
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Loc mgr
Asst loc
Asst loc
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Loc casting
Extras coord
Extras asst
Asst prod coord
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Payroll clerk
Payroll clerk
Prod secy
Accounting clerk
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Kershner
Asst to the prod
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Weller
Asst to Mr. Weller
Caterer
Craft service
Tape to film transfer
Scr supv, The 2d unit
2d unit prod supv
2d unit asst coord
Transportation capt, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt co-coord
RoboCop stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Robocop 2 anim seq
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the characters created by Edward Neumeier and Michael Miner.
SONGS
“The Kid Goes Wild,” performed by Babylon A.D., courtesy of Arista Records, Inc., written by Derek Davis, Jack Ponti, & Vic Pepe, published by BMG Songs, Inc./Little Elvis Music/Jack Ponti Music/Perfect Pen Music/Warner Bros. Music Corp. (ASCAP)
“Born To Be Wild,” written by Mars Bonfire
“Robosalsa,” written, produced and performed by Randy Stern, courtesy of Ranscott Music.
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
RoboCop II: This Cyborg is for Hire
RoboCop II: The Battle for Detroit
RoboCop: The Drug Wars
Release Date:
22 June 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles, New York opening: 22 June 1990
Production Date:
13 July--late October 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
29 August 1990
Copyright Number:
PA477601
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo ® in selected theatres.
Color
Prints
DeLuxe ®
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30271
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the near future, the city of Detroit, Michigan, enters into an agreement with the multinational corporation, Omni Consumer Products (OCP), to operate its police force. When Detroit defaults on its $37 million debt to OCP, the corporation plans to foreclose on the city by seizing its assets and privatizing them. Mayor Kuzak accuses OCP of deliberately manipulating the city’s credit crisis, and the corporation offers no rebuttal. Meanwhile, the police force is on strike after OCP cuts salaries and cancels pensions. With just a few officers still on duty, crime runs rampant and the force becomes dependent on “RoboCop,” the powerful cyborg police officer introduced by OCP a year earlier. RoboCop was built on the shattered body of police officer Alex Murphy, using robotic parts and titanium limbs, covered with a Kevlar “skin.” He is programmed with three prime directives: serve the public trust, protect the innocent, and uphold the law. Crime is on the rise in Detroit, due to widespread use of the new designer drug, “Nuke.” A messiah-like man named Cain, who heads the cartel manufacturing Nuke, promises paradise for people who use the highly addictive narcotic. During a raid of one of Cain’s manufacturing plants, RoboCop encounters a twelve-year-old drug dealer named Hob, who reminds the officer of his son, Jimmy. RoboCop is unable to shoot the boy, allowing him to escape. Later, RoboCop is captured during a raid on Cain’s hideout. Cain and his men use electric drills and saws to cut the mechanical body into pieces, dumping the parts in front of a police station. OCP collects the parts, but is daunted by the high cost of rebuilding RoboCop. The company recently ... +


In the near future, the city of Detroit, Michigan, enters into an agreement with the multinational corporation, Omni Consumer Products (OCP), to operate its police force. When Detroit defaults on its $37 million debt to OCP, the corporation plans to foreclose on the city by seizing its assets and privatizing them. Mayor Kuzak accuses OCP of deliberately manipulating the city’s credit crisis, and the corporation offers no rebuttal. Meanwhile, the police force is on strike after OCP cuts salaries and cancels pensions. With just a few officers still on duty, crime runs rampant and the force becomes dependent on “RoboCop,” the powerful cyborg police officer introduced by OCP a year earlier. RoboCop was built on the shattered body of police officer Alex Murphy, using robotic parts and titanium limbs, covered with a Kevlar “skin.” He is programmed with three prime directives: serve the public trust, protect the innocent, and uphold the law. Crime is on the rise in Detroit, due to widespread use of the new designer drug, “Nuke.” A messiah-like man named Cain, who heads the cartel manufacturing Nuke, promises paradise for people who use the highly addictive narcotic. During a raid of one of Cain’s manufacturing plants, RoboCop encounters a twelve-year-old drug dealer named Hob, who reminds the officer of his son, Jimmy. RoboCop is unable to shoot the boy, allowing him to escape. Later, RoboCop is captured during a raid on Cain’s hideout. Cain and his men use electric drills and saws to cut the mechanical body into pieces, dumping the parts in front of a police station. OCP collects the parts, but is daunted by the high cost of rebuilding RoboCop. The company recently spent $19 million developing “RoboCop 2,” an updated, larger, more heavily armed version of the cyborg, but the prototypes have all malfunctioned, either killing innocents or themselves during testing. OCP hires psychologist Dr. Juliette Faxx to head the new “attitude adjustment team” to help find ideal subjects for transformation into RoboCops. Faxx deduces that Alex Murphy succeeded as the original RoboCop because he had a fierce sense of duty, while the men used for RoboCop 2 have had emotional problems and consequently could not be controlled. Faxx oversees the reconstruction of the original RoboCop, programming him with more than 250 new directives, which include being nicer to people and trying to negotiate with criminals before using his weapons. When RoboCop returns to duty, he is more friendly, positive, and outgoing. However, when called into action, his new programming prevents him from capturing the criminals. Doctors at the police station determine that the new directives conflict with each other, effectively stopping him from doing his job. RoboCop goes to a power transformer, exposes himself to high voltage electricity, and short circuits. When he revives, his system defaults to its original programming. RoboCop raids the factory where Cain is sampling a new formula for Nuke. The drug lord escapes in a truck and runs over the cyborg, but RoboCop remains unscathed and wrecks the vehicle. While Cain is hospitalized, Dr. Faxx believes his addiction to Nuke would make him easy to control, and harvests his brain and spinal cord for use in RoboCop 2. Once Cain begins life as a cyborg, Faxx promises to keep him supplied with Nuke, provided he follows instructions. Presuming their leader is dead, young Hob partners with Cain’s girl friend, Angie, in taking control of the drug syndicate. Hob meets with Mayor Kuzak, offering him $50 million to repay the city’s debt to OCP, providing he end his war on crime and narcotics. RoboCop 2 suddenly appears and opens fire, killing many. Although he reveals his true identity to Angie, his programming malfunctions and he kills her. The original RoboCop arrives to find Hob dying from gunshot wounds and the boy tells him that Cain is the new RoboCop. OCP takes over the city and promises a better life for residents. They move the city government to a new high-rise “Civic Centrum” and announce plans to demolish most of the existing structures, replacing them with skyscrapers. Mayor Kuzak criticizes the plan, saying there will be no neighborhoods in this new city and no elected officials. OCP counters that people can buy stock in the company and own a piece of the city. The corporation then unveils RoboCop 2, announcing plans to manufacture the cyborgs in Detroit for sale around the world. Holding up a canister of Nuke, the OCP chief executive officer, known as the “Old Man,” promises to use RoboCop 2 to rid the city of the drug. However, RoboCop 2 is still addicted to Nuke and attempts to grab the canister. Dr. Faxx tries to disable RoboCop 2, but the cyborg destroys her remote control. RoboCop engages RoboCop 2 in battle and many bystanders are killed in the ensuing fight. RoboCop’s partner, Anne Lewis, rams a tank into RoboCop 2, then lures him with a canister of Nuke, which he quickly inserts into his machinery. As the drug takes effect, RoboCop attacks his enemy, removing Cain’s brain and smashing it. RoboCop 2 collapses as the original cyborg proves triumphant. OCP avoids blame for RoboCop 2 by manufacturing evidence to prove that Dr. Faxx was solely responsible for the problematic cyborg.


+

Legend
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Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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