Short Time (1990)

PG-13 | 97 mins | Comedy-drama | 4 May 1990

Full page view
HISTORY

       Principal photography began 19 Jul 1989 in Vancouver, Canada, the 1 Aug 1989 HR noted, although the story was set in Seattle, WA. According to production notes, a dangerous sequence was filmed near the top of the twenty-six-story Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce building in downtown Vancouver, requiring that eight to ten city blocks be cordoned off. The film’s main high-speed chase scene, featuring nine primary cars and sixty background cars, was filmed on a newly constructed highway in the Vancouver suburb of Richmond, Canada. The 10 May 1990 Hollywood Drama-Logue, favorably comparing the chase to “the granddaddy of them all” in The French Connection (1971, see entry), reported that it took six days to shoot. The 22 Sep 1989 Vancouver Sun remarked that the production had “just wrapped.”
       Director Gregg Champion told the 27 Apr 1990 HR that he chose Vancouver as a location because he “could save about 15%” by shooting there. The film’s $9 million budget, stretched over “a tight shooting schedule of forty-three days,” would have been at least $14 million in the U.S. Champion had previously worked in Vancouver as a second-unit director on Stake Out (1987, see entry), which also used the city as a stand-in for Seattle.
       The 28 Jul 1989 Vancouver Sun reported that actress Janet Jones was a “serious contender” for the role of “Carolyn Simpson,” but the part went to Teri Garr.
       Reviews were generally negative. The 2 May 1990 DV thought Short Time was “routinely stupid” and “actively repulsive.” It “debuted weakly in 10th place,” according to the ... More Less

       Principal photography began 19 Jul 1989 in Vancouver, Canada, the 1 Aug 1989 HR noted, although the story was set in Seattle, WA. According to production notes, a dangerous sequence was filmed near the top of the twenty-six-story Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce building in downtown Vancouver, requiring that eight to ten city blocks be cordoned off. The film’s main high-speed chase scene, featuring nine primary cars and sixty background cars, was filmed on a newly constructed highway in the Vancouver suburb of Richmond, Canada. The 10 May 1990 Hollywood Drama-Logue, favorably comparing the chase to “the granddaddy of them all” in The French Connection (1971, see entry), reported that it took six days to shoot. The 22 Sep 1989 Vancouver Sun remarked that the production had “just wrapped.”
       Director Gregg Champion told the 27 Apr 1990 HR that he chose Vancouver as a location because he “could save about 15%” by shooting there. The film’s $9 million budget, stretched over “a tight shooting schedule of forty-three days,” would have been at least $14 million in the U.S. Champion had previously worked in Vancouver as a second-unit director on Stake Out (1987, see entry), which also used the city as a stand-in for Seattle.
       The 28 Jul 1989 Vancouver Sun reported that actress Janet Jones was a “serious contender” for the role of “Carolyn Simpson,” but the part went to Teri Garr.
       Reviews were generally negative. The 2 May 1990 DV thought Short Time was “routinely stupid” and “actively repulsive.” It “debuted weakly in 10th place,” according to the 8 May 1990 DV. The Jul 1990 Box reported that its “tentative release” on 557 screens grossed a disappointing $3.2 million over three weekends.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “The producers wish to thank MacKenzie Management Ltd.; the Pepsi Cola Company; Olympia Beer,” and “This film is dedicated to the loving memory of Gower Champion (1919-1980) [and] Blake Gower Champion (1962-1987).” There is also a reference to a segment of "Stakeout ©1987 Touchstone Pictures,” which is seen in the film.
      End credits contain the following information: “Filmed on location in Vancouver, B.C., Canada.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
2 May 1990
p. 2, 21
Daily Variety
8 May 1990
p. 1
Hollywood Drama-Logue
10 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 1990
p. 4, 15
Los Angeles Times
4 May 1990
Calendar, p. 23
New York Times
4 May 1990
p. 10
The Vancouver Sun
28 Jul 1989
Section C, p. 1
The Vancouver Sun
22 Sep 1989
Section D, p. 1
Variety
9 May 1990
p. 30
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Gladden Entertainment presents
A Joe Wizan production
Released by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
Trainee asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Supv prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Addl op
Focus puller
2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Still photog
Still photog
Rigging gaffer
Lamp op
Lamp op
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Generator op
Generator op
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
B cam op, 2d unit
B cam 1st asst, 2d unit
B cam 2d asst, 2d unit
Cam trainee, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Lamp op, 2d unit
Lamp op, 2d unit
Generator op, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip and lighting equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Prod illustrator
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post prod supv
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec
Set dec buyer
Set dec buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Asst set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop buyer
Prop buyer
Const coord
Lead carpenter
Head scenic artist
Lead painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter's helper
Laborer
Laborer
Laborer
Greensman
Props, 2d unit
Props asst, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Seamstress
Ward, 2d unit
MUSIC
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
ADR asst
Sd eff rec
Sd eff coord
Sd eff coord
Foley crew
Foley crew
Foley crew
Foley crew
Rerec at
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Sd facility supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff best boy
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff best boy, 2d unit
Spec eff asst, 2d unit
Spec eff asst, 2d unit
Spec eff asst, 2d unit
Spec eff asst, 2d unit
Title des
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Makeup artist, 2d unit
Hairdresser, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Casting
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Asst to supv prod
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst loc mgr
Asst prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Champion
Asst to Mr. Champion
Asst to Mr. Champion
Extra casting
Unit pub
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Prod asst
Prod assoc
Transportation co-ord
Driver capt
Picture car capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal trainer
Asst chef
Craft service/First aid
Prod intern
Scr supv, 2d unit
Craft service/First aid, 2d unit
Voice casting
Post prod accountant
Post prod asst
Pub relations representative, U. S. and Canada
Pub relations representative, International
Insurance provided by
Completion bond by
Financial consultant
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
ADR artist
Stunt coord
Canadian stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“Roll With It,” performed by Steve Winwood, courtesy of Virgin Records Limited.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 May 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 4 May 1990
New York opening: week of 4 May 1990
Production Date:
19 July--mid September 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Gladden Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
29 May 1990
Copyright Number:
PA464056
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Deluxe
Duration(in mins):
97
Length(in feet):
9,171
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30217
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Robbers hijack a U.S. Army truck and steal boxes of .50-caliber ammunition. When a police car follows them, leader Carl Stark fires at it with a rocket launcher and blows the car up. Elsewhere, policemen in a Seattle, Washington, squad room give Burt Simpson a premature retirement party with donuts, but the captain orders them back to work. Fearing being shot by an armor-piercing bullet before retirement, Burt wears two bulletproof vests under his shirt as he goes on duty as a plainclothes detective. He and his partner, Ernie Dills, patrol the streets in an unmarked car. As Burt peruses the wanted posters in the daily bulletin, he looks up and sees the familiar face of Carl Stark walking on the street. He and Ernie give chase on foot, but Stark disappears into an apartment building. Rather than call for backup, Ernie proceeds down a hallway and sees a suspicious door. He is ready to knock, but Burt Simpson holds him back. Suddenly, a shotgun blast tears a hole in the door. Burt and Ernie crash into the apartment and chase Stark up a fire escape to the roof, where he accidentally drops his weapon on Burt’s head. When the felon leaps to another building, Burt grabs Ernie and refuses to let him jump. At end-of-the-day roll call, the captain asks if they stopped the pursuit because Burt has only eight more days on the force. Luckily, Stark dropped his experimental weapon, which was part of last week’s hijacked Army shipment. Federal agents believe the job was done by a Chicago, Illinois, gang led by Carl Stark, and the captain warns Burt he had better not “chicken out” the ... +


Robbers hijack a U.S. Army truck and steal boxes of .50-caliber ammunition. When a police car follows them, leader Carl Stark fires at it with a rocket launcher and blows the car up. Elsewhere, policemen in a Seattle, Washington, squad room give Burt Simpson a premature retirement party with donuts, but the captain orders them back to work. Fearing being shot by an armor-piercing bullet before retirement, Burt wears two bulletproof vests under his shirt as he goes on duty as a plainclothes detective. He and his partner, Ernie Dills, patrol the streets in an unmarked car. As Burt peruses the wanted posters in the daily bulletin, he looks up and sees the familiar face of Carl Stark walking on the street. He and Ernie give chase on foot, but Stark disappears into an apartment building. Rather than call for backup, Ernie proceeds down a hallway and sees a suspicious door. He is ready to knock, but Burt Simpson holds him back. Suddenly, a shotgun blast tears a hole in the door. Burt and Ernie crash into the apartment and chase Stark up a fire escape to the roof, where he accidentally drops his weapon on Burt’s head. When the felon leaps to another building, Burt grabs Ernie and refuses to let him jump. At end-of-the-day roll call, the captain asks if they stopped the pursuit because Burt has only eight more days on the force. Luckily, Stark dropped his experimental weapon, which was part of last week’s hijacked Army shipment. Federal agents believe the job was done by a Chicago, Illinois, gang led by Carl Stark, and the captain warns Burt he had better not “chicken out” the next time he sees him. In the locker room, detective Dan Miller mocks Burt’s courage. Accompanied by Ernie, Burt goes to an insurance agent to buy life insurance, because now that he is in his fifties, he fears dying and leaving his ten-year-old son, Dougie, without money to go to Harvard University. Sitting across from them, Mr. Spivak, an African American bus driver, asks if they think a recent marijuana cigarette will show up on his company-ordered test. Burt flashes his badge and tells him yes. After Burt and Spivak get their blood tests, Spivak switches the labels on their vials. Burt picks up his son, Dougie, at school and gives him a Harvard beer stein to match the boy's Harvard sweatshirt. His ex-wife, Carolyn Simpson, complains that the Harvard souvenirs create academic pressure on their son, but Burt is certain Dougie will someday be accepted to the Ivy League school. Elsewhere, Vito drives his cousin, Scalese, to meet with Stark and his men. They show Scalese one of the weapons, a 50-caliber rifle with a special scope and an eleven-round magazine that uses magnesium-tipped bullets costing $20 apiece. When Scalese claims the bullets are priced too high, Stark demonstrates one by shooting Vito’s car and blowing a hole from door to door. Dr. Drexler telephones Burt to come to his office and introduces him to Dr. Goldman, a hematologist. Tests show that because of a rare blood disorder called “Wexler’s curtain,” Burt has less than three weeks to live. In shock, Burt drives to Dougie’s school and watches him play baseball in the schoolyard. He dreams that Dougie receives his acceptance letter from Harvard, but Carolyn informs him he will have to attend community college because the paltry money from his father’s life insurance policy is gone. At the police department personnel bureau, Burt learns that if he is killed in the line of duty, his heirs will receive a special payment of $350,000. He goes to the captain to request double duty in “the Flats,” Seattle’s toughest district, claiming he wants to make up for letting Stark escape. When the captain agrees, Burt leaves his gun and bulletproof vests in his locker, and tells Ernie he wants to drive the squad car. He takes the first radio call, but it turns out to be a domestic disturbance between old people. As Burt talks about life after death, Ernie claims his father was revived after he died, but remembered no tunnel or bright lights. When a call comes in about a getaway car on the East Seattle Parkway, Burt takes off without Ernie and recklessly races across town. Robbers Jonah and Michael Lutz fire a machine gun at pursuing police cars, knocking them off the road, but Burt stays on their tail despite damage to his car. By rear-ending their car, he knocks the machine gun out of one robber’s hands, pulls ahead, and swerves in front of them, causing the robbers to plow into him. The Lutz brothers are injured, but Burt Simpson walks away unhurt. The captain awards him a medal of valor. Dan Miller grits his teeth and congratulates Burt on nabbing the Lutz brothers, who are part of Carl Stark’s gang. Miller suggests that Burt get a bulletproof house because Stark hates cops. Burt visits a mortician to buy a casket, but the salesman tries to sell him the most expensive model. He apologizes to Carolyn for the past five years and tells her he loves her. Thinking he is having a midlife crisis, she asks him to leave, but he confesses all his unspoken feelings toward her during crucial moments of their marriage, which he was always afraid to express in the past. They make love, and both confess afterward that it has been a long time. On patrol with Ernie, Burt talks about the beauty of flowers, and Ernie asks what is wrong. They get a radio call about a man wired with dynamite threatening to blow up a store with several hostages if his wife does not return. Dressed in bomb squad gear, Dan Miller is ready to go inside, but the moment Burt arrives, he strips down to T-shirt and shorts and walks in. The bomber claims that love is dead in the world, but Burt insists that the suicidal man's wife still loves him, but he needs to make his feelings known to her. Before long, Burt has the bomber, and the hostages, in tears. The man lays down his bomb and embraces him. After they walk out, the store blows up. The captain awards Burt the department’s silver cross for bravery. Fuming with anger, Dan Miller confronts Burt in the locker room for taking away his chance to be a hero, but Burt knocks him out with a swinging locker door. He picks up Dougie at school, takes him to a used car lot, and buys a Ford Mustang convertible. They drive the streets and visit the zoo, and when Burt drives him home and puts him in bed, Dougie asks if they can do it again next week. On patrol, Ernie tells Burt that earlier that day, Carl Stark killed a traffic policeman. Burt takes his partner to a fancy restaurant for lunch and thanks him for ten years as his partner. He lectures Ernie about doing today what he normally puts off until tomorrow, then gives Ernie the keys to his Mustang. Ernie demands that Burt see a doctor. When Burt kisses him on the head, Ernie mistakes it for a homosexual advance. Burt goes to the hospital, where the Lutz brothers are in traction and under armed guard. After giving the cop a few minutes to use the bathroom and grab a snack, Burt tortures the brothers by jerking their pulleys until one of them gives him Stark’s whereabouts. Meanwhile, Ernie goes to see Dr. Drexler abut Burt’s mental health and discovers that his partner is dying. However, when the doctor mentions that he did not report the marijuana use or the incipient blindness to the police department, Ernie is confused. Meanwhile, Spivak, the bus driver, crashes his bus. The captain finds Ernie at the hospital and informs him that Burt tortured the Lutz brothers and left to pursue Stark. Ernie relieves the cop watching the door and tortures the brothers to find where they sent his partner. Meanwhile, at a garage, as Scalese buys weapons from Stark’s gang, Burt crashes through the door and starts a gunfight that sends everyone scrambling. Burt dares Stark to kill him, but a closing steel door blocks Stark’s shots and a tossed grenade bounces past Burt and explodes out of range. On the roof, Stark jumps on a window cleaners’ scaffolding and rides it down, but Burt jams the gears and slides down the cable. As they fight on the scaffolding, a helicopter flies nearby. Using a bullhorn, Ernie calls out to Burt that Dr. Drexel said he is not going to die. Suddenly, a cable breaks and the scaffolding hangs from one end. Burt clings to the railing and Stark grips his leg, but falls to the pavement far below. Trying to pull himself up, Burt also falls. At Spivak’s funeral, Burt arrives on crutches with Ernie, Carolyn, and Dougie. Afterward, the captain presents Burt with the helicopter pilot’s photograph of him hanging upside down from the scaffold by a cable wrapped around his foot. Ernie lets Burt borrow the Mustang to drive Carolyn and Dougie home. Seeing three patrol cars rushing to a call, Burt begins to follow, then remembers he has retired.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.