3 Men and a Little Lady (1990)

PG | 99 mins | Comedy, Romance | 21 November 1990

Director:

Emile Ardolino

Cinematographer:

Adam Greenberg

Production Designer:

Stuart Wurtzel

Production Companies:

Touchstone Pictures, Radar Pictures
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HISTORY

3 Men and a Little Lady is a sequel to 1987’s 3 Men and a Baby (see entry), which was the top-grossing film of 1987, earning a total of $167.8 million, as reported in the 17 Jan 1990 DV. Lead actors, Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg, and Ted Danson, reprised their roles in the picture, along with actress Nancy Travis, who played the baby’s mother. However, original director Leonard Nimoy was already committed to directing Funny About Love (1990, see entry), and was unavailable to return for 3 Men and a Little Lady. Emile Ardolino, who had directed Dirty Dancing (1987, see entry), was hired as Nimoy’s replacement.
       Amid fears of a looming actors’ strike when the Screen Actors Guild contract expired in Jun 1989, Disney commissioned three story treatments. The 27 Dec 1988 Village Voice reported that Coline Serreau, who wrote and directed the original French film upon which 3 Men and a Baby was based, was at work on a sequel. An unnamed team of two men was also writing a treatment. In addition, Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon were hired to co-write another story. The Writers Guild of America told the Village Voice that having three teams working simultaneously on three different scripts was a legitimate practice, provided the writers all knew about their competition. The Parriott-McGibbon story was the one selected by Disney, and Charlie Peters wrote the screenplay from the treatment.
       Principal photography began on 10 Apr 1990, according to the 27 Apr 1990 DV production chart. Promotional materials in AMPAS library ... More Less

3 Men and a Little Lady is a sequel to 1987’s 3 Men and a Baby (see entry), which was the top-grossing film of 1987, earning a total of $167.8 million, as reported in the 17 Jan 1990 DV. Lead actors, Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg, and Ted Danson, reprised their roles in the picture, along with actress Nancy Travis, who played the baby’s mother. However, original director Leonard Nimoy was already committed to directing Funny About Love (1990, see entry), and was unavailable to return for 3 Men and a Little Lady. Emile Ardolino, who had directed Dirty Dancing (1987, see entry), was hired as Nimoy’s replacement.
       Amid fears of a looming actors’ strike when the Screen Actors Guild contract expired in Jun 1989, Disney commissioned three story treatments. The 27 Dec 1988 Village Voice reported that Coline Serreau, who wrote and directed the original French film upon which 3 Men and a Baby was based, was at work on a sequel. An unnamed team of two men was also writing a treatment. In addition, Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon were hired to co-write another story. The Writers Guild of America told the Village Voice that having three teams working simultaneously on three different scripts was a legitimate practice, provided the writers all knew about their competition. The Parriott-McGibbon story was the one selected by Disney, and Charlie Peters wrote the screenplay from the treatment.
       Principal photography began on 10 Apr 1990, according to the 27 Apr 1990 DV production chart. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate the film shot for six weeks in the greater Los Angeles, CA, area. The New York City brownstone apartment was built on a soundstage at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, CA. In Jun 1990, the film moved to New York City for two weeks of exteriors before relocating to England for the remainder of the shoot. The 700-year-old Broughton Castle near Banbury in the Cotswolds served as the Hargreave ancestral family home. Several scenes were shot on location in London and on soundstages at Shepperton Studios, in Surrey, England.
       Disney hoped to repeat the success of the original movie’s Thanksgiving day opening in 1987, and chose the Thanksgiving holiday on 21 Nov 1990 to release 3 Men and a Little Lady. The sequel opened on 1,281 screens and earned $29.7 million in sales receipts in its first twelve days, according to the 4 Dec 1990 DV box-office report.
       End credits state: “The Producers wish to thank: The New York Land Company and The KG Land New York Corporation.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Jan 1990
p. 1, 63.
Daily Variety
20 Nov 1990
p. 2, 15.
Daily Variety
27 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
4 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1990
p. 10, 73
Los Angeles Times
21 Nov 1990
Calendar, p. 1
New York Times
21 Nov 1990
p. 14
Variety
26 Nov 1990
p. 57
Village Voice
27 Dec 1988
p. 81-82.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures presents
Jean Francois Lepetit/ Interscope Communications, Inc. production
An Emile Ardolino Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
Unit prod mgr, United Kingdom crew
2d asst dir, United Kingdom crew
2d asst dir, United Kingdom crew
3d asst dir, United Kingdom crew
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy grip, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Best boy elec, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
Cam op, United Kingdom crew
Cam op, United Kingdom crew
1st asst cam, United Kingdom crew
Key grip, United Kingdom crew
Best boy grip, United Kingdom crew
Gaffer, United Kingdom crew
Best boy elec, United Kingdom crew
Still photog, United Kingdom crew
Arriflex® cameras and lenses provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed, New York crew
Asst ed, United Kingdom crew
SET DECORATORS
Lead set des
Set des
Set des
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Muralist
Set dec, New York crew
Set dec, United Kingdom crew
Prop master, United Kingdom crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer
Mr. Selleck's costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Score cond by
Score rec by
at Evergreen Recording Studios
Score mixed by
Mus scoring coord
Supv copyist
Contractor
SOUND
Split trak/Looping
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, New York crew
Boom op, New York crew
Cableman, New York crew
Sd mixer, United Kingdom crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Title des
Titles and opitcals
MAKEUP
Mr. Danson's old vicar makeup des by
Mr. Danson's old vicar makeup des by
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Mr. Selleck's makeup by
Mr. Selleck's hair by
Makeup artist, New York crew
Hairstylist, New York crew
Makeup artist, United Kingdom crew
Hairstylist, United Kingdom crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Cort
Asst to Mr. Ardolino
Loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Studio teacher
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Addl casting
Casting asst
Extras casting
Loc mgr, New York crew
Prod coord, New York crew
Transportation capt, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Loc mgr, United Kingdom crew
Prod coord, United Kingdom crew
Prod asst, United Kingdom crew
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Prod and distributed on
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the French film Trois hommes et un couffin by Coline Serreau (Flach Film, Soprofilms, TF1 Films Production, 1985).
SONGS
“Always Thinking Of You,” music by Tom Snow, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, performed by Donna DeLory, produced by Tom Snow
“Dancing In The Dark,” written by Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz
“Dance,” written by David Baerwald and Larry Klein, performed by David Baerwald, courtesy of A&M Records
+
SONGS
“Always Thinking Of You,” music by Tom Snow, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, performed by Donna DeLory, produced by Tom Snow
“Dancing In The Dark,” written by Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz
“Dance,” written by David Baerwald and Larry Klein, performed by David Baerwald, courtesy of A&M Records
“No Regrets,” written by Caron Wheeler, Tim Atkins, Peter Trotman and Karl Atkins, performed by Caron Wheeler, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capital Records, Inc./BMG Records (U.K.) Ltd.
“Get Up (Before The Night Is Over),” written by Jo Bogaert and Manuella Kamosi, performed by Technotronic, courtesy of SBK Records
“Rubber Duckie,” written by Jeffrey Moss, performed by Jim Henson, courtesy of Sesame Street Records
“Talkin’,” written by Najee Rasheed and Morris Pleasure, performed by Najee, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capital Records, Inc.
“Lento,” written by Jose Bordas, performed by Junior Rodriguez, courtesy of WEA Latina, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Waiting For A Star To Fall,” written by George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam, performed by Boy Meets Girl, courtesy of RCA Records
“The Three Men Rap,” written by Charlie Peters and G. Love E.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 November 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles, New York opening: 21 November 1990
Production Date:
10 April--late June 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures a.a.d.o. the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
26 November 1990
Copyright Number:
PA488001
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor ®
Duration(in mins):
99
Length(in feet):
9,322
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30787
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, five-year-old Mary Bennington is raised in a lavish brownstone apartment by four parents, her mother, actress Sylvia Bennington, and three adult male roommates, architect Peter Mitchell, artist Michael Kellam, and actor Jack Holden. Although Jack is Mary’s biological father, the three men have been raising Mary ever since a distraught Sylvia left her on their doorstep as an infant. When Sylvia came back for Mary, the men were too attached to let her go and came up with their unconventional living situation. The three men pitch in with every aspect of raising Mary and all attend a parents’ interview at a prestigious pre-school, the Morgan School. Although Sylvia was a struggling actress when she had Mary, she is now starring on Broadway in a production of Saint Joan. Sylvia is also dating the play’s director, Englishman Edward Hargreave. When Edward is invited to direct A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the National Theatre in London, England, he asks Sylvia to star in the production. He also proposes to Sylvia, but she delays giving him an answer. Later, Sylvia admits to her mother, Vera Bennington, that although she loves Edward, something is keeping her from saying yes to his proposal. Vera suggests that Sylvia has feelings for her roommate Peter, but Sylvia scoffs at the idea, saying that Peter will not open up to anyone except Mary. When Sylvia tells her living companions that Mary needs a more “normal” living environment, and adds that she would like to get married and have more children someday, the men are surprised. Shortly after, she accepts Edward’s proposal and tells her roommates ... +


In New York City, five-year-old Mary Bennington is raised in a lavish brownstone apartment by four parents, her mother, actress Sylvia Bennington, and three adult male roommates, architect Peter Mitchell, artist Michael Kellam, and actor Jack Holden. Although Jack is Mary’s biological father, the three men have been raising Mary ever since a distraught Sylvia left her on their doorstep as an infant. When Sylvia came back for Mary, the men were too attached to let her go and came up with their unconventional living situation. The three men pitch in with every aspect of raising Mary and all attend a parents’ interview at a prestigious pre-school, the Morgan School. Although Sylvia was a struggling actress when she had Mary, she is now starring on Broadway in a production of Saint Joan. Sylvia is also dating the play’s director, Englishman Edward Hargreave. When Edward is invited to direct A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the National Theatre in London, England, he asks Sylvia to star in the production. He also proposes to Sylvia, but she delays giving him an answer. Later, Sylvia admits to her mother, Vera Bennington, that although she loves Edward, something is keeping her from saying yes to his proposal. Vera suggests that Sylvia has feelings for her roommate Peter, but Sylvia scoffs at the idea, saying that Peter will not open up to anyone except Mary. When Sylvia tells her living companions that Mary needs a more “normal” living environment, and adds that she would like to get married and have more children someday, the men are surprised. Shortly after, she accepts Edward’s proposal and tells her roommates that she and Mary are moving to England. The men are distressed to lose Mary. One evening, Edward comes to dinner at the brownstone and makes a considerable effort to get along with the three “fathers,” but they do not like him, and warn him that raising a child is not as easy. After Edward leaves, Peter and Sylvia get into an argument and she slaps him. When Mary and Sylvia leave for London, the men console themselves by throwing an ill-fated party to celebrate their “return to bachelorhood.” Before long, Peter and Michael make a surprise trip to England to see Mary, and arrive at Edward Hargreave’s family estate during a garden party. Sylvia invites them to stay, but Edward is jealous of Peter, and suggests to his friend, Elsbeth Lomax, the headmistress of Pileforth Academy for Young Ladies, that Peter likes her. Elsbeth flirts with Peter at the party, but he is oblivious as he tries to sort out his feelings for Sylvia. Sometime later, Edward chastises Mary for disturbing his papers and impatiently sends her to her room. When Peter and Michael learn from Mary that Elsbeth Lomax measured her for a school uniform, they are upset at the thought of the young child being sent away to boarding school. They secretly visit Pileforth Academy, and are unimpressed. When they tell Sylvia that her future husband plans to send Mary to the boarding school, Edward denies it. Peter pleads with Sylvia not to marry Edward, but she dismisses him. Although angry at their interference, Sylvia allows the men to stay until the wedding, but orders them to mind their own business. As Jack arrives for the wedding, he credits Peter for holding their unconventional family together over the past five years. Jack suggests that Peter never allowed himself to admit his feelings for Sylvia, and believes she is only marrying Edward because she never received a proposal from her true love, Peter. Peter confides in Jack that he loves Sylvia, but fears a bad relationship, following a disastrous, short-lived marriage decades before. In time, Peter breaks into an office at Pileforth Academy and finds proof that Edward paid Mary’s tuition for the next semester. Elsbeth Lomax catches him and tries to seduce him. Peter flees, but when his car breaks down, he telephones Michael and Jack, and implores them to somehow delay the wedding. Elsbeth offers him a ride, and Peter explains the situation. When Elsbeth gets into a car accident en route to the wedding, they borrow a motorcycle and drive across a field to make it to the church on time. Meanwhile, Michael picks up the vicar who is to perform the ceremony, but deliberately takes him to the wrong church. At the correct church, Jack disguises himself as a bumbling, aging vicar, and tries to stall the nuptials. As the ceremony begins, Mary acts as both the flower girl and the ring bearer. Jack fumbles along, trying to delay the vows, but finally is forced to pronounce Edward and Sylvia married. Peter arrives as the newly married couple walks down the aisle, and presents proof that Edward has enrolled Mary at Pileforth Academy. Edward argues that it is the best place for the young girl to stay while they are touring the play. When Mary starts misbehaving, Edward yells at her, and Sylvia is convinced she married the wrong man. After punching Edward, Peter declares his love to Sylvia, and asks her to marry him. She says she loves Peter too, and they kiss. Edward reminds Sylvia that they are now married, but Jack takes off his disguise, revealing that the ceremony was a ruse. When Michael arrives with the real vicar, he marries Peter and Sylvia. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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