Wild Orchid (1990)

R | 110 mins | Drama, Romance | 27 April 1990

Director:

Zalman King

Producers:

Mark Damon, Tony Anthony

Cinematographer:

Gale Tattersall

Production Designer:

Carlos Conti

Production Company:

Vision
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HISTORY

End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks to: Jean-Jacques Brutschi, Jacques Griffault; Patrick Bastin, and all our friends at Credit Lyonnais Bank Nederland without whose support this film could not have been made”; “And further thanks to: Dino Menasche and Morris Israel; Companhia Cervejaria Brahma; Sheraton Rio Hotel and Towers; Bahia Othon Palace Hotel, Salvador, Bahia; Hotel Quitandinha, Petropolis R. J.; Zau Bijoux Jewelry of Rio; Veuve Clicquot Champagnes; Mr. Silvio Eisenberg; Embraer; Orlane Cosmetics; Dijon S.A. Water and Wines; Teachers Whiskey; Parker Pens; Greyhound Lines, Inc.; La Coupe Haircare; Zippo Lighters; Merle Worth; Mr. Nelson Saidy; Buffalo Clothing; Nosso Som Records; Valentina Hertz; Tim Rooney; Gary Kurfirst.”
       Foley artist Edward M. Steidele is credited onscreen as "Edward Steidel."
       A 12 Dec 1988 HR news item announced that Mickey Rourke would reteam with producer Mark Damon, and married screenwriters Zalman King and Patricia Louisianna Knop, with whom he had collaborated on 9 ½ Weeks (1986, see entry), for Wild Orchid. The picture was expected to cost $10 million, with a fifteen-week shooting schedule, to begin early 1989 in Brazil. Zalman King was set to direct.
       Although Anne Archer was originally cast as “Claudia,” she dropped out of the project over “creative differences,” according to a 21 Apr 1989 LAHExam brief. The actress was rumored to be concerned over the film’s eroticism. However, LAHExam stated that Archer, whose contract stipulated co-star approval, did not agree with the casting of first-time-actress Carré Otis in the role of “Emily.” Brooke Shields had previously been attached to play Emily, but left the project because her manager-mother wanted a body double to appear ... More Less

End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks to: Jean-Jacques Brutschi, Jacques Griffault; Patrick Bastin, and all our friends at Credit Lyonnais Bank Nederland without whose support this film could not have been made”; “And further thanks to: Dino Menasche and Morris Israel; Companhia Cervejaria Brahma; Sheraton Rio Hotel and Towers; Bahia Othon Palace Hotel, Salvador, Bahia; Hotel Quitandinha, Petropolis R. J.; Zau Bijoux Jewelry of Rio; Veuve Clicquot Champagnes; Mr. Silvio Eisenberg; Embraer; Orlane Cosmetics; Dijon S.A. Water and Wines; Teachers Whiskey; Parker Pens; Greyhound Lines, Inc.; La Coupe Haircare; Zippo Lighters; Merle Worth; Mr. Nelson Saidy; Buffalo Clothing; Nosso Som Records; Valentina Hertz; Tim Rooney; Gary Kurfirst.”
       Foley artist Edward M. Steidele is credited onscreen as "Edward Steidel."
       A 12 Dec 1988 HR news item announced that Mickey Rourke would reteam with producer Mark Damon, and married screenwriters Zalman King and Patricia Louisianna Knop, with whom he had collaborated on 9 ½ Weeks (1986, see entry), for Wild Orchid. The picture was expected to cost $10 million, with a fifteen-week shooting schedule, to begin early 1989 in Brazil. Zalman King was set to direct.
       Although Anne Archer was originally cast as “Claudia,” she dropped out of the project over “creative differences,” according to a 21 Apr 1989 LAHExam brief. The actress was rumored to be concerned over the film’s eroticism. However, LAHExam stated that Archer, whose contract stipulated co-star approval, did not agree with the casting of first-time-actress Carré Otis in the role of “Emily.” Brooke Shields had previously been attached to play Emily, but left the project because her manager-mother wanted a body double to appear in Shields’s nude scenes, as noted in the 7 Mar 1989 LAHExam. Model Cindy Crawford was also mentioned in a 21 Mar 1989 LAHExam brief as a contender for the role of Emily, before fellow model Carré Otis’s casting was confirmed.
       Jacqueline Bisset, a longtime friend of Zalman King and Patricia Louisianna Knop, replaced Anne Archer, as announced in the 10 Apr 1989 HR. According to a 9 Jun 1989 NYT article, Bisset was the first actress King and Knop had approached, but she had initially turned down the role because “the timing was inappropriate.”
       H.K. Stern Jewelers allegedly refused to loan jewelry to the filmmakers after reviewing the script and deeming it “too pornographic,” according to a 4 Dec 1989 HR “Rambling Reporter” column. The 18 Nov 1988 DV announced that Givenchy would release a “Wild Orchid” fragrance as a tie-in promotion with the film. A soundtrack was also set to be released by Seymour Stine’s Sire Records, as noted in a 10 Apr 1989 DV news item.
       Principal photography began 2 May 1989 in Salvador Bahia, Brazil, according to a 19 May 1989 HR item. Nine weeks of filming was set to take place in Solar do Unhao, a sugar cane plantation. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, and New York City were listed as additional filming locales. The shoot concluded on 14 Jul 1989, as noted in a 10 Aug 1989 HR item.
       With three months of editing remaining, filmmakers discovered that a pirated videotape containing erotic sequences from the unfinished film was “circulating in unspecified circles,” according to the 10 Aug 1989 HR. The film negative was subsequently checked for stolen segments.
       Wild Orchid was initially rated “X” by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), as stated in a 28 Mar 1990 Var article. The “objectionable scene” showed what appeared to be Rourke and Otis having sex. According to a 23 Apr 1990 Newsweek brief, rumors circulated that Rourke and Otis’s final sex scene was not simulated, possibly fueled by the producers’ admission that Rourke and Otis had begun a romantic relationship offscreen.
       A 4 May 1990 HR news brief announced that Carré Otis filed an injunction against Vision P.D.G., Vision International, Brazil Star Film, and Kruger Brent Group Inc., for “breach of contract, fraud, infliction of emotional distress and infringement on the rights to publicity.” Otis claimed that nude publicity photos were used without her consent in Playboy magazine, and the German magazine Kano. Mickey Rourke filed a nearly identical suit, as reported in the 14 May 1990 DV, seeking “compensatory and punitive damages.” Vision International filed cross-complaints against both actors, citing their refusal to promote the film, and accusing Rourke of “hostile and uncooperative behavior” that impeded production. A 26 Sep LAT item later reported that Rourke and Otis had settled their lawsuits on undisclosed terms.
       The world premiere took place 21 Dec 1989 in Rome, Italy, where an unrated version of the film debuted, according to a 27 Dec 1989 Var brief. The U.S. release of the R-rated version was originally scheduled for 20 Apr 1990, as noted in the 21 Feb 1990 Var, but was pushed back one week to 27 Apr 1990.
       Critical reception was overwhelmingly negative. Rourke’s “puffy” appearance was criticized by several reviewers, while overall performances, the script, and King’s direction were routinely panned. A 2 May 1990 HR “Hollywood Report” column described the $2.6 million opening weekend box-office grosses as “tame.” The film fared better overseas. In Italy, the unrated version grossed $403,210 in its first week, with a per screen average of $40,321. As stated in a 1 Aug 1990 DV, Wild Orchid was the first U.S. film in fifty years to screen concurrently in East and West Berlin, Germany, and only the second U.S. film to receive a wide release in East Germany.
       The 27 Aug 1990 DV reported that RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video was planning a 31 Oct 1990 release of two home video versions of Wild Orchid, one with an “R” rating, and the other unrated, with an additional six minutes of footage.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1988.
---
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1989.
---
Daily Variety
15 Jan 1990
p. 2, 29.
Daily Variety
14 May 1990.
---
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1990.
---
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1989
p. 1, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1990
p. 4, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 1990
p. 4, 21.
LAHExam
7 Mar 1989.
---
LAHExam
21 Mar 1989.
---
LAHExam
28 Mar 1989.
---
LAHExam
21 Apr 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Apr 1990
Calendar, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
26 Sep 1990
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
9 Jun 1989
Section C, p. 10.
New York Times
28 Apr 1990
p. 14.
Newsweek
23 Apr 1990.
---
Variety
27 Dec 1989.
---
Variety
17 Jan 1990
p. 29.
Variety
21 Feb 1990.
---
Variety
28 Mar 1990
p. 1, 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Vision P.D.G. presents
A Damon/Saunders Production
A Film by Zalman King
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
Brazilian 1st asst dir
Brazilian 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog/Carnival
Dir of photog/Kansas
Focus puller
2d asst cam
Elec best boy
Brazilian gaffer
Brazilian elec best boy
Brazilian key grip
Grip
Grip
Dir of photog/Op, 2d unit
Aerial photog, 2d unit
Focus puller, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Still photog, 2d unit
Still photog, 2d unit
Grip and lighting equip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Art dir
Art dir
Art dir/USA
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Asst const coord
Asst set dec
Set dresser
Prop master
Prop asst
Set painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Ward des by
Key costumer
Ward supv
Seamstress
Ward asst
Tuxedos and accessories by
Casual clothing
Fine jewelry
Beach apparel and clothing
Persal sunglasses
Lingerie
Lingerie
Hosiery
MUSIC
Orig score by
Orig score by
Soundtrack album exec prod
Soundtrack album exec prod
Soundtrack album prod
Mus coord
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Score rec at
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Sd transfer
Sd des and supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR group coord
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
ADR/Foley rec
Re-rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
Main title des
DANCE
Asst choreog, 2d unit
MAKEUP
Hair & make-up des
Asst. make-up & hair des
Ms. Bissel's hair & make-up
Mr. Rourke's hairstyle des
Mr. Rourke's hair stylist
Mr. Rourke's make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Brazilian prod coord
Brazilian prod coord
Prod assoc
Prod asst
LA prod coord
LA prod coord
LA prod coord
Prod controller
Asst. prod controller
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Post prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Trainee, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Mr. Rourke's trainer, 2d unit
Project consultant, 2d unit
Unit pub, 2d unit
Asst pub, 2d unit
Asst pub, 2d unit
Public relations, 2d unit
Account supv, 2d unit
Promotional consultant, 2d unit
Marketing supv, 2d unit
Marketing liaison, 2d unit
Marketing liaison, 2d unit
Casting, 2d unit
Casting, 2d unit
Casting, 2d unit
Addl casting, 2d unit
Casting services, 2d unit
Brazilian casting, 2d unit
Brazilian extra casting, 2d unit
Brazilian extra casting, 2d unit
Brazilian extra casting, 2d unit
Asst to Mr. King, 2d unit
Asst to producers, 2d unit
Asst to producers, 2d unit
Asst to producers, 2d unit
Asst to Mr. Rourke, 2d unit
Spec guest appearance, 2d unit
Spec guest appearance, 2d unit
Shipping and customs brokerage
Shipping and customs brokerage
Travel/Customs
Film delivery/Shipments
Air transportation
Account supv
Customized motorcycle service
Completion guarantor
Financial consultant
Asst to Mr. Afman
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stand-in
Mr. Rourke's stunt double
Mr. Rourke's double
Stunt coord, 2d unit
COLOR PERSONNEL
Laboratory services
Laboratory services
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Uma Historia De Ifá (Ejigbo),” written by Rey Zulú and Ytthama Tropitalia, performed by Margareth Menezes, published by Latino Editorial Musical, Ltda./Music Bras (BMI), courtesy of Polygram do Brasil Ltda
“Dark Secret,” written by Andy Paley/David Rudder/ Paul Pesco/Jeff Vincent, performed by David Rudder and Margareth Menezes, produced by Anay Paley/Paul Pesco/ Jeff Vincent, published by Warner-Chappell (BMI-ASCAP), CBS Songs (ASCAP) & London Music, UK
“Shake The Sheik,” written by Josch/Mullrich/ Klein/Spremburg, performed by Dissidenten, produced by Marlon Klein, published by Copyright Control
+
SONGS
“Uma Historia De Ifá (Ejigbo),” written by Rey Zulú and Ytthama Tropitalia, performed by Margareth Menezes, published by Latino Editorial Musical, Ltda./Music Bras (BMI), courtesy of Polygram do Brasil Ltda
“Dark Secret,” written by Andy Paley/David Rudder/ Paul Pesco/Jeff Vincent, performed by David Rudder and Margareth Menezes, produced by Anay Paley/Paul Pesco/ Jeff Vincent, published by Warner-Chappell (BMI-ASCAP), CBS Songs (ASCAP) & London Music, UK
“Shake The Sheik,” written by Josch/Mullrich/ Klein/Spremburg, performed by Dissidenten, produced by Marlon Klein, published by Copyright Control
“Slave Dreams,” written by Ofra Haza, Bezalel Aloni & Aharon Amram, performed by Ofra Haza, produced by Ofra Haza, Bezalel Aloni, assimilated and remixed by Mark Kramins, published by Edition/Tazagi Music (GEMA) (ASCAP)
“Love Song,” written by Bezalel Aloni, performed by Ofra Haza, produced by Wally Brill, published by Edition Tazagi Music (GEMA) (ASCAP)
“Bird Boy,” composed by Nana Vasconcelos and Don Cherry, performed by Nana Vasconcelos and The Bushdancers, published by Island Music, Inc. and Eternal River (BMI), courtesy of Antilles New Directions Records and Island Records Company
“It Only Has To Happen Once,” written by Arto Lindsay, Peter Scherer & Nana Vasconcelos, performed by Ambitious Lovers, published by Virgin Music, Inc. (ASCAP)/ Virgin Songs, Inc. (BMI)/ Nanavas Music (Enemy Publishing) (BMI)
“Twistin’ With Annie,” written by Hank Ballard and Andy Paley, performed by Hank Ballard, produced by Andy Paley, published by Gambi Music, Inc. Canada
“Magic Jeweled Limousine,” written by Momo, performed by NASA, produced by Momo & Andy Paley, published by Copyright Control
“Oxossi,” written and performed by Geronimo, published by Arca & Flecha Editoes E promocoes, Ltda., distributed by Continental (Gravacoes Electritas S.A.)
“Sol Negro,” written by Caetano Velosa, performed by Maria Bethania and Gal Costa, published by BMG Arabella Ltda., courtesy of BMG Ariola Brasil
“Children of Fire,” written by Jeff Vincent/Paul Pesco/David Rudder/ Andy Paley, performed by David Rudder, produced by Andy Paley/Paul Pesco/Jeff Vincent, published by Warner-Chappell (BMI-ASCAP), CBS Songs & London Music, UK
“Promised Land,” written by Karl Hyde, Rick Smith, Alfie Thomas, performed by Underworld, produced by Rick Smith, published by SBK Music Inc. (BMI)
“Warrior,” written by John London/Jon McGeogh/ Allan Dias/Bruce Smith/Lu Edmonds, performed by Public Image Ltd., published by Virgin Music, Inc. (ASCAP)
“Flor Cubana,” written by Clovis Gogo & Cedir, performed by Simone Morena, published by Latino Editora Music Ltda
“Just A Carnival,” written and performed by David Rudder, produced by Paul Pesco and David Rudder, produced by Paul Pesco and David Rudder, published by London Music, UK
“Wheeler’s Howl,” written by J.W. Harding/Andy Paley/Jeff Vincent, performed by The Rhythm Methodists, produced b Andy Paley/Jeff Vincent, published by Warner-Chappell (BMI-ASCAP), Plangens Visions, UK.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 April 1990
Premiere Information:
World premiere: 21 December 1989 in Rome, Italy
Los Angeles opening: 27 April 1990
New York opening: week of 28 April 1990
Production Date:
2 May--14 July 1989
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Emily Reed, a beautiful young lawyer, leaves the Midwest for the first time to interview for jobs in New York City. During an interview at a firm specializing in international law, she claims to be fluent in several languages, including Portugese, and asserts that she has always been fascinated by other cultures. Emily is offered the job, as long as she is willing to travel to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, that morning. After she accepts, Emily meets Claudia Dennis, with whom she will travel to Brazil. Claudia informs Emily about the real estate deal they are going to close. Arriving in Rio de Janeiro, they are welcomed by Flavio, a hotel concierge, and driven to a construction site. Claudia points out an old hotel that will be torn down and replaced after their deal is brokered, and describes plans for a marina. Claudia seeks out Elliot Costa, who is due to sign over the land, but discovers that he has gone to Buenos Aires, Argentina, for a wedding. She decides to follow him there and instructs Emily to go on a date in her place that night. Claudia describes her date as “a predator” and warns Emily not to reveal too much. With Claudia gone, Emily explores the grounds and spies a Brazilian couple having sex inside the dilapidated hotel. Scandalized, Emily hurries back to her room and puts on the dress that Claudia left for her to wear. In the lobby, she meets Claudia’s date, James Wheeler, an enigmatic businessman accompanied by two bodyguards. They walk to a restaurant, and Wheeler lags behind so that he can watch Emily. At dinner, he asks Emily to guess the ... +


Emily Reed, a beautiful young lawyer, leaves the Midwest for the first time to interview for jobs in New York City. During an interview at a firm specializing in international law, she claims to be fluent in several languages, including Portugese, and asserts that she has always been fascinated by other cultures. Emily is offered the job, as long as she is willing to travel to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, that morning. After she accepts, Emily meets Claudia Dennis, with whom she will travel to Brazil. Claudia informs Emily about the real estate deal they are going to close. Arriving in Rio de Janeiro, they are welcomed by Flavio, a hotel concierge, and driven to a construction site. Claudia points out an old hotel that will be torn down and replaced after their deal is brokered, and describes plans for a marina. Claudia seeks out Elliot Costa, who is due to sign over the land, but discovers that he has gone to Buenos Aires, Argentina, for a wedding. She decides to follow him there and instructs Emily to go on a date in her place that night. Claudia describes her date as “a predator” and warns Emily not to reveal too much. With Claudia gone, Emily explores the grounds and spies a Brazilian couple having sex inside the dilapidated hotel. Scandalized, Emily hurries back to her room and puts on the dress that Claudia left for her to wear. In the lobby, she meets Claudia’s date, James Wheeler, an enigmatic businessman accompanied by two bodyguards. They walk to a restaurant, and Wheeler lags behind so that he can watch Emily. At dinner, he asks Emily to guess the personal secrets of other diners. She describes an attractive married couple, stating that they met at a ski resort and honeymooned at a “grand hotel” that was surprisingly rundown. Wheeler presses for more information, but Emily does not want to go further. When he threatens to approach the couple, Emily stops him, continuing her story about the honeymoon. She describes the couple having sex in full view of a voyeur. Wheeler leads Emily to a patio, where they don masks and join a group of samba dancers. As she watches a couple doing a seductive dance, Emily is startled by a man in a wolf mask, who bites her neck. She runs back to her hotel. In the morning, Emily is shocked to find James Wheeler in her room. She accuses him of biting her neck but he denies doing it. Claudia calls from Buenos Aires and gives Emily orders to set up a meeting with Elliot Costa’s lawyers at the airport. Wheeler makes a date to pick up Emily that afternoon. When she meets him, he introduces her to Hanna and Otto Munch, the couple they observed at dinner. Wheeler has invited Otto, a racecar driver, to accompany him on a motorcycle ride. Emily joins Wheeler on his motorcycle, while Hanna rides alongside Otto’s motorcycle in a limousine. Wheeler leads them to a Carnival celebration by the beach. There, Hanna is harassed on the dance floor, and Wheeler steps in to protect her. As Wheeler fights Hanna’s harasser, another man tries to steal Hanna’s necklace. Her dress is torn, exposing her breasts. Otto tries to cover Hanna up, but she yells at him to look at her. Wheeler ushers Otto, Hanna, and Emily back into the limousine. They ride in silence until Hanna starts to cover her breasts. Wheeler stops her, expressing his desire to look at Hanna’s body. He compliments Hanna’s breasts and torso, and suspects that Otto’s anger toward her must stem from a past infidelity. Wheeler encourages Otto to admire Hanna, and places the man’s hand on Hanna’s thigh. He watches as they begin to make love. Emily becomes uncomfortable and asks Wheeler to stop them. Wheeler claims he cannot, and wonders if Emily has ever given in to primal urges. Wheeler takes Emily back to Elliot Costa’s land and leads her inside the dilapidated hotel. Emily embraces him, but he evades her, claiming he is not good at being touched. That night, Emily waits for Wheeler at an outdoor bar. She is offended when an American named Jerome propositions her for sex. Wheeler arrives, and Emily explains the situation in tears. However, Wheeler encourages her to go back to Jerome’s room. Emily tentatively collects the stack of money and room key Jerome left behind, and follows him to his room. She stands in the window so that Wheeler can see her as Jerome removes her dress. Changing her mind, she tries to get away, but Jerome wrestles her to the floor. She relents, and they have sex. The next day, Claudia and Elliot Costa return from Buenos Aires. At the airport, they sit down with Emily, and Elliot Costa’s lawyers, including Jerome McFarland, to finalize the real estate deal. Pretending not to recognize Jerome, Emily pulls Claudia aside and confesses the details of their tryst. Emily suggests she remove herself from negotiations, but Claudia tells her the fun is only just beginning. When Elliot’s lawyers attempt to demand more from the deal, Claudia asks Jerome about his wife, Cynthia, indirectly threatening to expose his infidelity. The deal is signed, and Claudia plans a celebration for that evening, when Mr. Chin, the Chinese investor whom she and Emily represent, arrives. Claudia asks Emily what she thinks about Wheeler, and Emily describes him as strange. Claudia admits she has been obsessed with him since they first met, and even hired a private detective to follow him. She uncovered that he grew up an orphan in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and had a debilitating stutter as a child. Just before greeting Mr. Chin, Claudia and Emily learn that Wheeler thwarted their land deal by buying the deed to Elliot Costa’s hotel. Claudia forbids Emily from disclosing the information to Chin, and their celebration goes on as planned. In the morning, Emily and Claudia spot an attractive Brazilian man on the beach, and Claudia gives him the key to her room. When he arrives, Claudia forces Emily to stay with them and translate their conversation. After Claudia instructs the man to undress, Wheeler barges in, attacks the man, and leaves in a huff. Emily runs after Wheeler, and accuses him of setting her up for failure. He tells her she is “like all the rest of them” and storms out of the hotel. Later, Emily receives a package, containing the deed to the old hotel, which Wheeler has signed over to her. She informs Claudia that their deal is saved. Later, Wheeler shows up at Emily’s hotel room and discusses his hardscrabble childhood. He began investing in real estate at sixteen years old and found that women were attracted to his success, despite his stutter. The more remote he became, the more women pursued him. Therefore, he began “playing games” with romantic partners, and the games became a way of life. Emily begs him to touch her. At first, he refuses. However, he gives in, and they make love. +

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Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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