Young Guns II (1990)

PG-13 | 104 mins | Western | 1 August 1990

Director:

Geoff Murphy

Writer:

John Fusco

Producers:

Irby Smith, Paul Schiff

Cinematographer:

Dean Semler

Editor:

Bruce Green

Production Designer:

Gene Rudolf
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HISTORY

       Production was scheduled to begin in Sep 1989 in Santa Fe, NM, but Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, and Lou Diamond Phillips, the stars of the original Young Guns (1988, see entry), had not yet approved the last-minute script or negotiated their new contracts in the wake of the original film’s success, the 25 Aug 1989 Long Beach Press-Telegram noted. Principal photography eventually began on 19 Jan 1990 in Old Tucson, AZ, according to that day’s DV. Despite being a Young Guns sequel, the film was titled Hellbent for Leather during preproduction, the 12 Nov 1989 LAT noted.
       The film began production without Teamsters or International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) contracts, the 2 Feb 1990 DV reported, prompting IATSE president Al DiTolla to order business agents to “advise your members to refrain from rendering further services.”
       Lou Diamond Phillips, who played the Navajo Indian “Jose Chavez Y Chavez,” worked with a Navajo language instructor and medicine man to prepare for his role, as reported in the 9 Mar 1990 Globe and Mail (Toronto). Phillips was injured when a blank gunshot “spooked” his horse. With his foot trapped in a stirrup, the actor was dragged along the ground for fifty yards and suffered a broken elbow and lacerations. He was airlifted to a hospital in Albuquerque, NM, where he underwent surgery, and was unable to film his final scene before the production ended on 17 Mar 1990, according to the 18 Mar 1990 Austin American Statesman and 21 Mar 1990 Orange County Register. The loss of the ... More Less

       Production was scheduled to begin in Sep 1989 in Santa Fe, NM, but Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, and Lou Diamond Phillips, the stars of the original Young Guns (1988, see entry), had not yet approved the last-minute script or negotiated their new contracts in the wake of the original film’s success, the 25 Aug 1989 Long Beach Press-Telegram noted. Principal photography eventually began on 19 Jan 1990 in Old Tucson, AZ, according to that day’s DV. Despite being a Young Guns sequel, the film was titled Hellbent for Leather during preproduction, the 12 Nov 1989 LAT noted.
       The film began production without Teamsters or International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) contracts, the 2 Feb 1990 DV reported, prompting IATSE president Al DiTolla to order business agents to “advise your members to refrain from rendering further services.”
       Lou Diamond Phillips, who played the Navajo Indian “Jose Chavez Y Chavez,” worked with a Navajo language instructor and medicine man to prepare for his role, as reported in the 9 Mar 1990 Globe and Mail (Toronto). Phillips was injured when a blank gunshot “spooked” his horse. With his foot trapped in a stirrup, the actor was dragged along the ground for fifty yards and suffered a broken elbow and lacerations. He was airlifted to a hospital in Albuquerque, NM, where he underwent surgery, and was unable to film his final scene before the production ended on 17 Mar 1990, according to the 18 Mar 1990 Austin American Statesman and 21 Mar 1990 Orange County Register. The loss of the scene, which introduced his character, required the producers to “work a few expositional tricks” in the editing room, executive producer-screenwriter John Fusco told the 6 June 1990 Orange County Register. Fusco also complained that the film was beset with “rough weather,” including four snowstorms.
       William Peterson, who played “Pat Garrett,” replaced actor Patrick Wayne who portrayed Garrett in the original Young Guns, according to the 15 Jan 1990 Chicago Tribune. The 30 May 1990 Newsday (Long Island) noted that rock star Jon Bon Jovi, who provided music for Young Guns II, also appeared in an uncredited cameo as a prisoner shot during an escape attempt.
       A star-studded audience attended the film’s premiere on 30 Jul 1990 in Hollywood, CA, the 1 Aug 1990 LAT reported. Young Guns II received lukewarm reviews, but garnered “impressive numbers” at the box office during its first week of release.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks to Nomura Babcock & Brown Film Partners I; Linda Hutchinson, New Mexico Film Commission; Bill MacCallum and Bill Kirkpatrick, Arizona Film Commission; Department of Public Safety, State of New Mexico; J. W. Eaves; Bob Shelton, Old Tucson; Julie Shapiro, Travelcorps; American Humane Association; City of Bisbee; Al Tellez-Arizona Teamster Local 104; T-Shirt Gallery, Santa Fe.”
      Title cards early in the film give the following information: “Old Fort Sumner, New Mexican Territory, 1879” and “Town of Lincoln.” End credit title cards provide the following epilogues: “Arkansas Dave Rudabaugh was beheaded soon after arriving in Mexico as a warning to outlaws crossing the border”; “Pat Garrett’s book, The Authentic Life of Billy the Kid, was a failure. Garrett died in February 1908, shot by a 21 year old man”; and, “Brushy Bill Roberts went before New Mexico Governor Thomas Mabry on November 29, 1950. Despite identification by several surviving friends of the notorious outlaw, he was discredited. He died twenty-eight days later in Hico, Texas. Whether or not Brushy Bill Roberts was Billy the Kid remains a mystery.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Austin American Statesman
18 Mar 1990
Section A, p. 18
Chicago Tribune
15 Jan 1990
p. 12
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1989
p. 3
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1990
p. 3
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1990
p. 20
Daily Variety
19 Jan 1990
p. 33
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1990
p. 2, 18
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1990
p. 1
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1990
p. 14
Globe and Mail (Toronto)
9 Mar 1990
Section C, p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
23 Dec 1988
p. 1, 30
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1990
p. 5, 13
Long Beach Press-Telegram
25 Aug 1989
Section B., p. 18
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1989
Calendar, p. 23
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1990
Calendar, p. 3
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1990
Calendar, p. 7
New York Times
1 Aug 1990
p. 15
Newsday (Long Island, NY)
30 May 1990
p. 11
Orange County Register
15 May 1990
Section K, p. 4
Orange County Register
21 Mar 1990
Section L, p. 4
Orange County Register
6 Jun 1990
Section I, p. 4
Philadelphia Daily News
1 Aug 1990
p. 31
Variety
25 Apr 1990
p. 23
Variety
1 Aug 1990
pp. 65-66
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And
As Pat Garrett
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
James G. Robinson Presents
A Morgan Creek Production
A Film by Geoff Murphy
Released through Twentieth Century Fox
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Co-exec prod
Co-exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst 2d cam
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst cam-2d unit
1st asst cam-2d unit
Steadicam op
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Asst still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Art dept coord
Draftsman
Draftsman
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutting
Negative cutting, Gary Burritt
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Asst leadman
Key set dec
On-set dec
Set dressing coord
Set dressing coord
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Head scenic artist
On-set scenic
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Const coord - Arizona
Const coord - New Mexico
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Const shopper
Const asst
Const asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Asst cost des
Men`s ward
Women's ward
Extras' ward
Cost shop supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Songs by
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Guitar soloist
Mus contractor
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Supervising sd ed
Supervising sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Processed eff by
ADR supv
ADR asst
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR voices
Dial coach
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cable op
Cable op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Audio programming
Rec at
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Key eff
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff asst
Image general mgr
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup/Hair supv
Key hair artist
Makeup asst
Hair asst
Spec makeup eff creator
Spec makeup
Spec makeup
Spec makeup
Hair weaving
Hair weaving
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Asst to the prods
Prod assoc
Asst prod coord
Loc mgr - Arizona
Loc mgr - New Mexico
Loc scout - New Mexico
Loc asst - New Mexico
Loc casting - Arizona
Loc casting - New Mexico
Casting assoc
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Accounting clerk
Accounting clerk
Post prod accountant
Accounting asst
Prod secy
Unit pub
Projectionist
Projectionist
Head wrangler
Wrangler
Wrangler
Wrangler
Wrangler
Wrangler
Wrangler
Asst to Mr. Robinson
Asst to Mr. Barber
Asst to Mr. Nicksay
Asst to Mr. Fusco
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Estevez
Asst to Mr. Sutherland
Asst to Mr. Phillips
Asst to Mr. Petersen
Morgan Creek admin
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
2d unit coord
Tutor
Translator
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Chauffeur to Mr. Robinson
Security
Craft service
Asst craft service
Key medic
Firearms provided by
Completion guaranty provided by
Completion guaranty provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Color by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by John Fusco.
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Blaze Of Glory," written and performed by Jon Bon Jovi, © 1990 Bon Jovi Publishing/PRI Music, Inc. (ASCAP), courtesy of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"Billy Get Your Guns," written and performed by Jon Bon Jovi, © 1990 Bon Jovi Publishing/PRI Music, Inc. (ASCAP), courtesy of PolyGram Records, Inc. Music from & inspired by the film Young Guns II written & performed by Jon Bon Jovi, available on Mercury Records.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Hellbent for Leather
Release Date:
1 August 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 30 July 1990
Los Angeles opening: 1 August 1990
New York opening: 1 August 1990
Production Date:
19 January--17 March 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Morgan Creek Film Partners I
Copyright Date:
3 August 1990
Copyright Number:
PA473111
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
104
Length(in feet):
9,349
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30644
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1950, “Brushy” Bill Roberts, a terminally ill old man, meets attorney Charles Phalen on a desert highway in New Mexico. Brushy wants the state governor to pardon him for killing twenty-one men in the 1870s. He identifies himself as William H. Bonney, alias the outlaw “Billy the Kid,” but Phalen reminds him that Sheriff Pat Garrett killed Billy the Kid seventy years earlier. Ignoring the comment, Brushy recalls being wounded in the leg when he, Pat Garrett, and Arkansas Dave Rudabaugh ambushed and killed a posse of vigilantes at the end of the Lincoln County War; Billy and his gang ride to Old Fort Sumner in New Mexico Territory to dress his wound at Beever Smith’s rundown hacienda. Smith informs them that Governor Lew Wallace is arresting Billy’s former gang, the “Regulators,” for prosecution. Josiah G. “Doc” Scurlock has already been taken into custody and shares a jail cell in the sheriff’s basement with fellow Regulator Jose Chavez Y Chavez and several members of “the Murphy Gang,” their enemies in the Lincoln County War. However, Billy is at the top of the governor’s “hanging list.” Fifteen-year-old orphan Tom O’Folliard asks to join the gang because he idolizes Billy the Kid, but Billy tries to dissuade him. As Pat Garrett informs Billy that Governor Wallace is in Lincoln for the trial and wants to negotiate his surrender, an old friend named Inyo tries to shoot Billy to collect the $500 reward. Billy kills Inyo, and several U.S. soldiers attack, forcing Billy to escape Fort Sumner. He arrives unannounced at Governor Wallace’s quarters and is ushered into his office. The governor offers to pardon Billy’s crimes during the Lincoln County ... +


In 1950, “Brushy” Bill Roberts, a terminally ill old man, meets attorney Charles Phalen on a desert highway in New Mexico. Brushy wants the state governor to pardon him for killing twenty-one men in the 1870s. He identifies himself as William H. Bonney, alias the outlaw “Billy the Kid,” but Phalen reminds him that Sheriff Pat Garrett killed Billy the Kid seventy years earlier. Ignoring the comment, Brushy recalls being wounded in the leg when he, Pat Garrett, and Arkansas Dave Rudabaugh ambushed and killed a posse of vigilantes at the end of the Lincoln County War; Billy and his gang ride to Old Fort Sumner in New Mexico Territory to dress his wound at Beever Smith’s rundown hacienda. Smith informs them that Governor Lew Wallace is arresting Billy’s former gang, the “Regulators,” for prosecution. Josiah G. “Doc” Scurlock has already been taken into custody and shares a jail cell in the sheriff’s basement with fellow Regulator Jose Chavez Y Chavez and several members of “the Murphy Gang,” their enemies in the Lincoln County War. However, Billy is at the top of the governor’s “hanging list.” Fifteen-year-old orphan Tom O’Folliard asks to join the gang because he idolizes Billy the Kid, but Billy tries to dissuade him. As Pat Garrett informs Billy that Governor Wallace is in Lincoln for the trial and wants to negotiate his surrender, an old friend named Inyo tries to shoot Billy to collect the $500 reward. Billy kills Inyo, and several U.S. soldiers attack, forcing Billy to escape Fort Sumner. He arrives unannounced at Governor Wallace’s quarters and is ushered into his office. The governor offers to pardon Billy’s crimes during the Lincoln County War in return for testifying against the Murphy gang, with the proviso that Billy must then leave New Mexico. Billy agrees to be kept under guard in the comfort of a Lincoln hotel for his own protection. However, as soon as Governor Wallace leaves town, D.A. Rynerson decides to convict and hang Billy. The outlaw slips his bonds, escapes from the hotel, and sees that Chavez Y Chavez, Doc Scurlock, and the Murphy boys are jailed in the sheriff's cellar. That night, when masked vigilantes arrive to lynch the prisoners, D.A. Rynerson and Sheriff Kimbel stand aside and let them take Doc Scurlock and Chavez Y Chavez. However, as the vigilantes ride away with their captives, they pull off their hoods and reveal themselves as Billy the Kid and his gang. At that moment, a real lynch mob arrives, and a battle ensues. Billy’s gang kills most of the posse and sets half the town on fire. The next morning, Billy and Doc Scurlock fight over old slights, but Doc decides to ride with Billy’s gang to Mexico. D.A. Rynerson tells Sheriff Kimbel to bring Billy and his outlaws back, but the lawman refuses. At Beever Smith’s hacienda, Hendry William French, a farmer whose land was stolen by rancher John Simpson Chisum, joins the gang, along with young Tom O’Folliard, but Pat Garrett decides to leave and open a tavern. The gang rides to Chisum’s ranch to collect $500 he owes for past services, but Chisum defies them. When they shoot two of Chisum’s men and leave, Chisum appeals to Governor Wallace and D.A. Rynerson to exterminate Billy’s band of outlaws. They hire Pat Garrett to be the new sheriff of Lincoln County because he knows Billy the Kid’s habits and hideouts, and as an incentive, they pay him $1,000. Meanwhile, the gang rustles Chisum’s cattle. Hendry wants a nickname like the other outlaws, but Billy tells him he will have to earn one. Pat Garrett hires a local newspaper publisher, Ashmun Upson, to ride along with him and write a book about the hunt for Billy the Kid. John W. Poe and the Cattlemen’s Association join Garrett as his posse. When Billy the Kid’s gang hears news that Pat Garrett has turned against them, they continue toward Mexico. As they pass through Indian territory, Chavez Y Chavez attacks Dave Rudabaugh for vandalizing a burial ground, but the others break up the fight. To taunt Garrett, Billy leaves behind a dried buffalo scrotum on a wall that contains Garrett’s photograph with the eyes shot out. The six outlaws arrive in White Oaks, where Jane Greathouse runs a brothel. Indians surround Garrett’s posse, thinking they disturbed the sacred burial ground, but Ashmun Upson, who speaks their language, convinces them that Billy the Kid’s outlaws were the culprits. In White Oaks, townspeople form a mob to capture the gang inside the brothel, and Deputy James Carlyle goes inside to negotiate their escape in return for letting the town hang “the Indian,” Chavez Y Chavez. However, Billy disarms the deputy, dresses him with Chavez Y Chavez’s Mexican hat and blanket, and shoves him out the door. The townspeople open fire, but scatter in shame when they realize they killed their own deputy. When Pat Garrett arrives, he renews his acquaintance with Jane, but burns down her house when she defies him. Hurrying after Billy’s gang, Garrett’s posse overtakes them at a guano mine and drives them into the hills. Garrett shoots young Tom O’Folliard, but the others escape. At an abandoned adobe settlement, Billy admits to Doc Scurlock that the trail they are following does not go to Mexico after all. Accusing Billy of leading young Tom O’Folliard to his death, Doc threatens to shoot him, but changes his mind. As Doc leaves, he is killed by gunfire from Garrett’s posse. Chavez Y Chavez, Rudabaugh, and Hendry escape, but the Indian is wounded. Garrett captures Billy the Kid and returns him to Lincoln for hanging. However, Jane Greathouse slips Billy a note revealing that she has hidden a gun in the sheriff’s outhouse. There, Billy shoots both the sheriff and deputy. He secretly returns to Beever Smith’s hacienda in Fort Sumner just as Chavez and Hendry arrive and announce that Arkansas Dave Rudabaugh escaped to Mexico. Billy contemplates riding to Canada, but Chavez Y Chavez plans to stay in New Mexico because he is mortally wounded. Although Billy finally gives Hendry a moniker, “Buckshot George,” the farmer decides to return to normal life. At a town festival, Billy sees an effigy of himself hanging from a fake gallows. He spends the night with a Mexican woman, but when he steps outside in the morning, Pat Garrett confronts him. Billy tells his former friend to shoot, but Garrett, who taunts him for not going to Mexico, allows him to escape. Later, Billy the Kid’s empty coffin is buried during a funeral attended by Pat Garrett, John W. Poe, and the cattlemen. “Brushy” Bill Roberts finishes telling his story to Charles Phalen, then guides his horse into the desert. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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