The Addams Family (1991)

PG-13 | 100 mins | Comedy, Horror, Fantasy | 22 November 1991

Director:

Barry Sonnenfeld

Producer:

Scott Rudin

Cinematographer:

Owen Roizman

Production Designer:

Richard MacDonald

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

       Plans for an “Addams Family” feature film were first announced in 1965, when the 16 Jun HR suggested that The Addams Family (ABC, 18 Sep 1964—2 Sep 1966) television creator David Levy had received approval from cartoonist Charles Addams. Series production company, Filmways, Inc., agreed to produce the project through their motion picture division. A 5 Oct 1987 People magazine news item suggested that a motion picture was still in development following the success of that year’s other television-to-film adaptations, Dragnet and The Untouchables (see entries).
       By 1989, Orion Pictures had acquired ownership of the Filmways library, and executives Marc Platt and Mike Medavoy included The Addams Family among the properties they might potentially adapt into a motion picture. According to a 31 Mar 1991 LAT article, producer Scott Rudin, then head of production at Twentieth Century Fox, also hoped to make an “Addams Family” film, but was unable to obtain rights from the Charles Addams estate. Lady Barbara Colyton, the cartoonist’s second wife and executor, eventually decided to sell the motion picture rights to Orion on condition that Rudin serve as producer. A 31 Oct 1991 DV news story estimated the deal at $14.5 million.
       Despite numerous reports that Anjelica Huston was the only actress considered to play “Morticia,” the 18 Nov 1989 Screen International announced that Ivan Reitman was initially hired to direct Cher opposite Kevin Kline as “Gomez,” with production set to begin in the spring of 1990. The following summer, the 11 Aug 1990 Screen International suggested Robin Williams was rumored to ... More Less

       Plans for an “Addams Family” feature film were first announced in 1965, when the 16 Jun HR suggested that The Addams Family (ABC, 18 Sep 1964—2 Sep 1966) television creator David Levy had received approval from cartoonist Charles Addams. Series production company, Filmways, Inc., agreed to produce the project through their motion picture division. A 5 Oct 1987 People magazine news item suggested that a motion picture was still in development following the success of that year’s other television-to-film adaptations, Dragnet and The Untouchables (see entries).
       By 1989, Orion Pictures had acquired ownership of the Filmways library, and executives Marc Platt and Mike Medavoy included The Addams Family among the properties they might potentially adapt into a motion picture. According to a 31 Mar 1991 LAT article, producer Scott Rudin, then head of production at Twentieth Century Fox, also hoped to make an “Addams Family” film, but was unable to obtain rights from the Charles Addams estate. Lady Barbara Colyton, the cartoonist’s second wife and executor, eventually decided to sell the motion picture rights to Orion on condition that Rudin serve as producer. A 31 Oct 1991 DV news story estimated the deal at $14.5 million.
       Despite numerous reports that Anjelica Huston was the only actress considered to play “Morticia,” the 18 Nov 1989 Screen International announced that Ivan Reitman was initially hired to direct Cher opposite Kevin Kline as “Gomez,” with production set to begin in the spring of 1990. The following summer, the 11 Aug 1990 Screen International suggested Robin Williams was rumored to star opposite Huston. A 23 Jan 1991 HR item also included Matt Marfoglia among the cast, but he is not credited onscreen.
       The 18-24 Nov 1993 edition of Drama-Logue claimed that producers considered using a puppeteer and mechanical voice for “Cousin Itt” before John Franklin was selected for the role. To portray “Thing,” the hand of magician-actor Christopher Hart was chosen from various magicians, puppeteers, mimes, and models. Since Hart was physically present to perform in scenes with the other actors, producers ensured he received an onscreen acting credit by appealing to the Screen Actors Guild (SAG).
       According to the 31 Mar 1991 LAT, Rudin hired his friend, novelist Paul Rudnick, to rewrite the script. In the 9 Jan 1992 issue of Rolling Stone, Larry Wilson disputed previous claims that the original script was “devoid of laughs,” and revealed that Rudnick did not receive onscreen credit due to an arbitration with the Writers Guild of America (WGA). With several scenes added to the new draft, the film’s budget escalated from $25 million to nearly $30 million.
       The article also indicated that cinematographer-turned-first-time director Barry Sonnenfeld was not Rudin’s first choice for The Addams Family. The producer frequently joked with Sonnenfeld about the other directors considered for the job, including: Tim Burton, Joe Dante, Terry Gilliam, Richard Benjamin, David Lynch, Arthur Hiller, and Rob Reiner. Sonnenfeld reportedly struggled with stress on the project, and once fainted on set while speaking with Orion employee Ron Lynch, who monitored production costs.
       An 8 Feb 1991 DV story stated that rehearsals began in Oct 1990. A 26 Mar 1991 HR production chart confirmed a start date of 26 Nov 1990, in Los Angeles, CA. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filming took place at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre and the Brentwood Theatre at the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Motel scenes were shot at the Wampum Court Motel in Sylmar, CA. The Oct 1991 issue of Theatre Crafts stated that production designer Richard MacDonald created sketches of the Addams mansion as a reference for location scouts, but was unable to find a suitable location and opted to build a seventy-five foot façade in the Burbank mountains. Interiors for the ballroom, upstairs bedrooms, and master bedroom were constructed on four stages at Hollywood Center Studios, while additional sets were built at CBS Studio Center in Studio City, CA, Ren-Mar Studio in Hollywood, CA, and Stage 15 at the Paramount studio. The picture marked the ninth feature film collaboration of MacDonald with his wife, costume designer Ruth Myers.
       The Oct 1991 issue of Los Angeles Magazine stated that food stylist and caterer Nina Solomon created various “vile” meals the characters ate onscreen using food coloring and objects such as goat heads, hooves, brains, cow’s liver, and tripe. Solomon is not credited onscreen.
       A 25 Feb 1991 DV brief reported that Owen Roizman left the project earlier that month to fulfill a prior commitment on Grand Canyon (1991, see entry). LAT stated that his replacement, assistant photographer Gale Tattersall, was hospitalized with a sinus infection in late Feb 1991, causing production to shut down for several days. Filming was delayed again in early Mar 1991, when Sonnenfeld went east to attend his wife’s surgery in NY.
       Around this time, financially strained Orion decided to sell domestic rights to The Addams Family in an attempt to repay interest on nearly $500 million in debt. The film was part of a multi-picture package on which Orion hoped to earn a combined $70-$90 million. However, the company was unable to attract sufficient investors after “underselling” foreign distribution rights to Columbia Pictures for $3.5 million in order to acquire a $175 million advance. After weeks of bidding against Universal Pictures, the 15 Mar 1991 DV announced that Paramount Pictures had acquired the property for $21-$23 million. The deal would reimburse Orion for the $11 million already spent on production, as well as the remaining $10-$11 million expected to complete the remaining twenty days of filming. With $800,000 in cost overruns, Rudin gave up his $400,000 salary in order to get the project set up at Paramount, where his production company was based.
       Production notes and the 17 Apr 1991 DV suggested that the 100-day shooting schedule concluded mid-Apr 1991.
       Although the 11 Feb 1991 Newsweek indicated that release was originally scheduled for Christmas 1991, the 15 Mar 1991 DV indicated that the film’s move from Orion to Paramount did not give the new studio enough time to capitalize on the desired marketing opportunities leading up to the holiday season. With the opening rescheduled for 17 Nov 1991, the 30 Oct 1991 HR announced Paramount’s plans to attract child and teenage audiences by producing a three-minute promotional music video with Capitol Records and Fragile Films, featuring Huston, Julia, and rap artist, Hammer, who wrote several songs for the film. In addition, the Nickelodeon cable television network scheduled a 13 Nov 1991 TV segment hosted by Christina Ricci, titled, “Wednesday’s Wednesday.” The 31 Oct 1991 DV reported that Paramount also obtained exclusive global merchandising rights to Hanna-Barbera’s animated television series, The Addams Family (ABC, 12 Sep 1992—6 Nov 1993). While the show was not scheduled to air until after the release of the film, the acquisition gave the studio complete merchandising rights to the “Addams Family” characters.
       The 15 Aug 1991 HR stated that the feature was first screened 24 Oct 1991, at ShowEast in Atlantic City, NJ. According to a 9 Oct 1991 DV brief, the West Coast premiere was scheduled to take place 19 Nov 1991 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater, with proceeds contributing to the American Cinematheqeue Program Fund. A 28 Oct 1991 New York magazine item indicated that Sonnenfeld chose to host a 16 Nov 1991 East Coast premiere in East Hampton, NY, to benefit his stepdaughter’s school, Hampton Day School, in Bridgehampton, NY.
       According to a 26 Nov 1991 DV article, the film was a commercial success, earning $24.2 million during its opening weekend. The 13 Jan 1992 LAT announced that the picture had surpassed a $100 million domestic box-office gross, to date.
       As a result, Sonnenfeld, Rudin, the principal cast, and many of the crew returned for Addams Family Values (1993, see entry). Carel Struycken and Christopher Hart reprised their roles for the 1998 direct-to-video Warner Bros. film, Addams Family Reunion, which was created as a pilot for the Fox Family television series, The New Addams Family (1998—1999). In addition to a successful Broadway production, the 31 Oct 2013 DV announced that Charles Addams’ characters were set to appear in a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer animated feature, following the dissolution of Illumination Entertainment’s plans for a stop-motion animated picture directed by Tim Burton.
       After The Addams Family’s release, David Levy filed a $50 million lawsuit against Paramount, Orion, Rudin, and Colyton, alleging that he created several “creative elements” specially for the television series, such as character names, character traits, and Vic Mizzy’s theme music, which appeared in the film series without his permission. Levy requested an injunction against the continued use of his ideas. The outcome of the case could not be determined.
      End credits misspell the name of John Franklin’s character, Cousin Itt, as “Cousin It,” and include the following statements: “The Producer and Director wish to gratefully acknowledge the consulting services and assistance of The Lady Colyton in the making of this film,” and, “Special Thanks to Bill Bernstein, Marc Platt, Ron Lynch, William Sherak, Susan Ringo.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1991.
---
Daily Variety
25 Feb 1991.
---
Daily Variety
15 Mar 1991
p. 1, 27.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1991.
---
Daily Variety
9 Oct 1991.
---
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1991.
---
Daily Variety
26 Nov 1991
p. 1.
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1992
p. 3, 60.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 2013.
---
Drama-Logue
18-24 Nov 1993
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1965.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1991
p. 1, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1991
p. 3, 8.
Los Angeles Magazine
Oct 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Mar 1991
Calendar, pp. 6-7, 20, 27.
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1991
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jan 1992.
---
New York
28 Oct 1991.
---
New York Times
22 Nov 1991
p. 1.
Newsweek
11 Feb 1991.
---
People
5 Oct 1987.
---
Rolling Stone
9 Jan 1992.
---
Screen International
18 Nov 1989.
---
Screen International
11 Aug 1990.
---
Theatre Crafts
Oct 1991
p. 41.
Variety
18 Nov 1991
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Scott Rudin Production
A Barry Sonnenfeld Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst photog
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
2d asst photog
Film loader
Still photog
Video asst
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Chief rigging lighting tech
1st company grip
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Cranes and dollies by
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec
Asst prop master
Prop person
Leadperson
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set des
Set des
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Const coord
Const foreperson
Paint foreperson
Greens foreperson
Prod painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Cutter/Fitter
MUSIC
Dance mus arr
Mus score prod by
Mus score prod by/Orch cond by
Addl orch by
Addl orch by
Addl orch by
Addl orch by
Addl orch by
Orch contractor
Mus preparation
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Co-supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR rec
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Addl sd eff created by
Addl sd eff created by
Addl sd eff created by
Re-rec at
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Visual eff co-supv
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreperson
Spec eff foreperson
Titles and opt eff by
Main title des by
Main title des by
Opt composites, Visual eff unit
Visual Concepts Engineering
Opt composites, Visual eff unit
Anim eff, Visual eff unit
Anim eff, Visual eff unit
Anim eff, Visual eff unit
Photog eff, Visual eff unit
Photog eff, Visual eff unit
Photog eff, Visual eff unit
Visual eff ed, Visual eff unit
Visual eff ed, Visual eff unit
Opt eff line up, Visual eff unit
Opt eff line up, Visual eff unit
Opt eff line up, Visual eff unit
Opt eff line up, Visual eff unit
Opt printing, Visual eff unit
Opt printing, Visual eff unit
Opt printing, Visual eff unit
Opt printing, Visual eff unit
VCE admin, Visual eff unit
VCE admin, Visual eff unit
Visual eff primary prod illustrator, Visual eff un
Storyboards, Visual eff unit
Coord, Visual eff unit
Continuity, Visual eff unit
Key asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Spec makeup, Visual eff unit
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Cam asst, Visual eff unit
Cam asst, Visual eff unit
Cam asst, Visual eff unit
Chief lighting tech, Visual eff unit
Chief lighting tech, Visual eff unit
Chief lighting tech, Visual eff unit
1st company grip, Visual eff unit
1st company grip, Visual eff unit
Spec prosthetics and mechanical devices, Visual ef
Alterian Studios, Inc.
Spec prosthetics and mechanical devices, Visual ef
"Thing" prosthetics and puppets, Visual eff unit
David Miller Studios
"Thing" prosthetics and puppets, Visual eff unit
Model train crash, Visual eff unit
Matte art/Composites, Visual eff unit
Illusion Arts
Matte art/Composites, Visual eff unit
Illusion Arts
Matte art/Composites, Visual eff unit
DANCE
Choreog
Fencing choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup des
Hair des
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Scr supv
Voice casting
Key prod asst
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Sonnenfeld
Asst to Mr. Sonnenfeld
Asst to Ms. Huston
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Security
First aid
Product placement services
"Sally Jessy Raphael" excerpts furnished courtesy
Filmed at
Hollywood, California
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Processing by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Charles Addams.
MUSIC
"The Addams Family Theme" by Vic Mizzy.
SONGS
"The Addams Groove," music by Hammer/Pilate, lyric by Hammer, includes "The Addams Family Theme" by Vic Mizzy, performed by Hammer
"Too Legit To Quit," music by Hammer/Pilate/Early/Kelly/Burrell, lyric by Hammer, performed by Hammer
"This Is The Way We Roll," music by Hammer/Pilate, lyric by Hammer, performed by Hammer
+
SONGS
"The Addams Groove," music by Hammer/Pilate, lyric by Hammer, includes "The Addams Family Theme" by Vic Mizzy, performed by Hammer
"Too Legit To Quit," music by Hammer/Pilate/Early/Kelly/Burrell, lyric by Hammer, performed by Hammer
"This Is The Way We Roll," music by Hammer/Pilate, lyric by Hammer, performed by Hammer
"Burn It Up," music by Hammer/Pilate, lyric by Hammer, performed by Hammer
"Mamushka," music by Marc Shaiman, lyric by Betty Comden and Adolph Green
"Carol Of The Bells," by M. Leontovich & Peter J. Wilhousky, "Deck The Halls (Arrangement)/The Fa-La-La Song," by Nick D'Amico, performed by The Caroling Company
"Playmates," by Saxie Dowell, performed by The Kipper Kids
"O Sole Mio," by Edoardo di Capua, Giovanni Capurro, and Alfredo Mazzucchi, performed by Beniamino Gigli, courtesy of Angel/EMI, A Division of Capitol Records, Inc. by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"The Mooche," by Duke Ellington and Irving Mills
"Getting To Know You," by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
"La Folia," arranged and performed by Carole Koenig, courtesy of Music on the Hammered Dulcimer
"Sally Jesse Raphael," by Dan Radlauer.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 November 1991
Premiere Information:
East Hampton, NY premiere: 16 November 1991
Los Angeles premiere: 19 November 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 November 1991
Production Date:
26 November 1990--mid April 1991 in Los Angeles
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30985
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Gomez Addams bemoans the loss of his estranged brother, Fester, who left after a disagreement twenty-five years earlier. As he discusses his feelings with his wife, Morticia, Gomez receives a visit from his lawyer, Tully Alford, who hopes to repay his illicit debts by gaining access to the Addams fortune. Meanwhile, Tully’s wife, Margaret, helps Morticia and Granny the witch select items to donate to an upcoming charity auction. At his office, Tully meets with vindictive loan shark, Abigail Craven, and her son, Gordon, who have come to collect their money. Realizing that Gordon closely resembles Gomez’s long-lost brother Fester, Abigail conspires to send him to the Addams home to rob the family’s secret vault. That night, the Alfords join Gomez, Morticia, and their children, Wednesday and Pugsley, for Granny’s séance to summon Fester. With his head shaved to resemble Fester, Gordon appears at the front door with Abigail, posing as his psychiatrist, “Dr. Greta Pinder-Schloss.” She explains that she found “Fester” in Miami, Florida, after he disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle. All except Wednesday are convinced by the charade, since the skeptical girl studied the Bermuda Triangle as a hobby. After breakfast the next morning, Gordon is pleasantly surprised when Gomez brings him to the vault, hidden hundreds of feet below the house. There, the men watch childhood home videos, and Gordon learns that the rift between Fester and his brother began when Gomez jealously seduced Fester’s lovers, conjoined twins Flora and Fauna Amor. Over time, Gomez and Morticia grow suspicious when Gordon forgets essential details about Fester’s past. Dreading discovery, Gordon telephones his mother, who returns to the house as Dr. Pinder-Schloss, claiming that Gomez’s suspicions stem ... +


Gomez Addams bemoans the loss of his estranged brother, Fester, who left after a disagreement twenty-five years earlier. As he discusses his feelings with his wife, Morticia, Gomez receives a visit from his lawyer, Tully Alford, who hopes to repay his illicit debts by gaining access to the Addams fortune. Meanwhile, Tully’s wife, Margaret, helps Morticia and Granny the witch select items to donate to an upcoming charity auction. At his office, Tully meets with vindictive loan shark, Abigail Craven, and her son, Gordon, who have come to collect their money. Realizing that Gordon closely resembles Gomez’s long-lost brother Fester, Abigail conspires to send him to the Addams home to rob the family’s secret vault. That night, the Alfords join Gomez, Morticia, and their children, Wednesday and Pugsley, for Granny’s séance to summon Fester. With his head shaved to resemble Fester, Gordon appears at the front door with Abigail, posing as his psychiatrist, “Dr. Greta Pinder-Schloss.” She explains that she found “Fester” in Miami, Florida, after he disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle. All except Wednesday are convinced by the charade, since the skeptical girl studied the Bermuda Triangle as a hobby. After breakfast the next morning, Gordon is pleasantly surprised when Gomez brings him to the vault, hidden hundreds of feet below the house. There, the men watch childhood home videos, and Gordon learns that the rift between Fester and his brother began when Gomez jealously seduced Fester’s lovers, conjoined twins Flora and Fauna Amor. Over time, Gomez and Morticia grow suspicious when Gordon forgets essential details about Fester’s past. Dreading discovery, Gordon telephones his mother, who returns to the house as Dr. Pinder-Schloss, claiming that Gomez’s suspicions stem from displaced guilt. As Gordon grows closer to Wednesday and Pugsley, he disobeys Abigail’s orders to rob the vault while home alone, and instead accompanies the family to see a play at the children’s school. In the greenhouse the next morning, the lumbering butler, Lurch, finds Abigail trapped in a tangle of vines. She scolds Gordon for growing too attached to the Addams family, and plans to find the vault herself. To celebrate “Fester’s” return, Morticia and Gomez host a farewell party attended by extended family members and the effusive Amor twins, who tell Tully that Fester is heir to the Addams fortune. Upstairs, Wednesday sees Abigail shaving Gordon’s head and discovers he is an imposter. Using an escape chute, Wednesday flees to the graveyard behind the house, leaving Gordon no choice but to return to the party. As Gomez invites Gordon to reprise Fester’s traditional “Mamushka” dance routine, Abigail continues to doubt her son’s commitment to carrying out their plan. Margaret Alford develops an attraction to the Addams’ hair-covered Cousin Itt, and Tully approaches the family’s disgruntled neighbor, Judge George Womack, with a plan to name Fester legal executor of the estate. Claiming that Fester feels threatened by Gomez, Tully forces the remainder of the family to evacuate the house and move into a motel. As the Addamses search for jobs to support themselves, Abigail and Gordon repeatedly fail to break past the vault’s complicated security system. One night, Morticia returns to the house to speak with Gordon, but is taken hostage by Abigail and Tully. “Thing,” a disembodied hand the family keeps as a pet, alerts Gomez that Morticia is in danger and leads him back to the house. Tired of his mother’s bullying, Gordon forsakes Abigail and opens a cursed copy of a novel titled Hurricane Irene, which unleashes a violent storm within the library. As Morticia and Gomez escape unharmed, the winds eject Abigail and Tully out the window and into two empty graves dug by Wednesday and Pugsley. Seven months later, the Addams family hosts a Halloween party. Gomez reveals that Gordon was Fester all along, but suffered from amnesia after being trapped in the Bermuda Triangle. When a lightning strike during the hurricane restored his memory, Fester was welcomed back to the family. Joined by newly-coupled Margaret and Cousin Itt, Fester and the children play in the graveyard as Morticia and Gomez watch contentedly. Pulling out a knitted baby garment, Morticia reveals that she is pregnant, and Gomez kisses her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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