Full page view
HISTORY

Sometime in 1979, when Bruce Willis was a struggling actor in New York City, he co-wrote a song, “The Hudson Hawk,” with his friend Robert Kraft, a composer-musician. As he gained prominence as an actor, Willis had the idea of bringing the song’s cat burglar character to the big screen. On 26 Feb 1987, DV announced that the actor planned to make Hudson Hawk for his own production company. A script had been written by Jeff Reno and Ron Osborn, writer-producers of the popular television show, Moonlighting (ABC, 3 Mar 1985--14 May 1989), on which Willis played a leading role. One year later, an 18 Nov 1988 DV news item indicated that producer Joel Silver, who had worked with Willis on Die Hard (1988, see entry) and Die Hard 2 (1990, see entry), would oversee Hudson Hawk for Tri-Star Pictures. Willis’s salary was listed as “$4 million plus.” In 1989, the LAT reported that screenwriter Steven de Souza had penned a fresh script. The 4 Jun news brief also announced Michael E. Lehmann’s appointment as director. Sometime between that announcement and the start of production in 1990, writer Daniel Waters was brought on to share screenwriting credit with de Souza. Waters had previously worked with Lehmann on the black comedy, Heathers (1988, see entry). In a 19 May 1991 interview with the LAT, Silver and Willis credited Waters with the script’s overall “attitude.”
       On 12 Nov 1989, the LAT reported that actress Isabella Rossellini would co-star opposite Willis in the role of “Anna Baragli.” However, in the ... More Less

Sometime in 1979, when Bruce Willis was a struggling actor in New York City, he co-wrote a song, “The Hudson Hawk,” with his friend Robert Kraft, a composer-musician. As he gained prominence as an actor, Willis had the idea of bringing the song’s cat burglar character to the big screen. On 26 Feb 1987, DV announced that the actor planned to make Hudson Hawk for his own production company. A script had been written by Jeff Reno and Ron Osborn, writer-producers of the popular television show, Moonlighting (ABC, 3 Mar 1985--14 May 1989), on which Willis played a leading role. One year later, an 18 Nov 1988 DV news item indicated that producer Joel Silver, who had worked with Willis on Die Hard (1988, see entry) and Die Hard 2 (1990, see entry), would oversee Hudson Hawk for Tri-Star Pictures. Willis’s salary was listed as “$4 million plus.” In 1989, the LAT reported that screenwriter Steven de Souza had penned a fresh script. The 4 Jun news brief also announced Michael E. Lehmann’s appointment as director. Sometime between that announcement and the start of production in 1990, writer Daniel Waters was brought on to share screenwriting credit with de Souza. Waters had previously worked with Lehmann on the black comedy, Heathers (1988, see entry). In a 19 May 1991 interview with the LAT, Silver and Willis credited Waters with the script’s overall “attitude.”
       On 12 Nov 1989, the LAT reported that actress Isabella Rossellini would co-star opposite Willis in the role of “Anna Baragli.” However, in the spring of 1990, various contemporary sources indicated that French actress Isabelle Adjani had joined the cast, replacing Rossellini. A few months later, Adjani was no longer listed among the cast, as evidenced by a 10 Jul 1990 HR production chart. When Var announced, on 25 Jul 1990, that Dutch actress Maruschka Detmers would be co-starring in the picture, principal photography had already begun.
       Hudson Hawk was filmed in New York, NY; Rome, Italy; Rimini, Italy; Budapest, Hungary; London, England; and Los Angeles, CA. Principal photography began 9 Jul 1990, with cinematographer Jost Vacano behind the camera. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, cast and crew spent the first three weeks in New York City and its environs, where a chase scene necessitated closing the outbound side of the Brooklyn Bridge for “an entire week.” Although the closure occurred at night, a 13 Aug 1990 Newsweek item criticized the production for causing horrible traffic jams. At the beginning of Aug 1990, cast and crew relocated to Rome, Italy, where they began filming at various landmark locations, as well as at Cinecittá Studios.
       Supporting actor Richard E. Grant, who wrote an article about his on-set experiences for the Apr 1996 issue of Vanity Fair, recalled that, at the end of the company’s first week in Rome, Bruce Willis and Joel Silver went to Nice, France, to meet with pop singer and actress, Madonna. Meanwhile, cast and crew learned that Maruschka Detmers was bowing out of the picture due to back problems. Grant claimed that Willis and Silver went to Nice to ask Madonna to assume the role of Anna Baragli. However, the touring singer denied their request. Various contemporary sources reported that American actress Andie MacDowell joined the production when it returned to Rome, replacing Detmers. Grant noted that MacDowell’s arrival coincided with the arrival of a new cinematographer, Dante Spinotti. When the NYT published a 26 May 1991 article about Hudson Hawk’s chaotic production, the change in cinematographers was attributed to Joel Silver’s desire to recoup days that had been lost to the schedule. The producer thought Spinotti could work at an accelerated pace.
       At Cinecittá Studios in Rome, production designers re-created a “room in the Vatican Art Museum,” from which Bruce Willis’s character steals a rare book. Various contemporary sources indicated that, although filmmakers hoped to shoot in Vatican City, the papal administration would not grant permission. In search of substitute exterior shots, the production moved to Rimini, Italy, a seaside resort several hundred miles north of Rome. There, a nearby fifteenth century castle, the Fortress of San Leo, became the setting for several key scenes.
       After three months filming in Italy, the production moved to Budapest, Hungary. Richard E. Grant noted that the date of the company’s departure to Budapest, 25 Oct 1990, was to have been his “final day” on the film, according to his contract. The actor recalled arriving at Mafilm Studios on 1 Nov 1990 for his first day of shooting in Budapest, fully aware that he would be working for three more weeks. Inside the Hungarian studio, the design team re-created the “Renaissance workshop” of Italian inventor Leonardo da Vinci. Two elaborate props, one built in England, and the other built in California, were flown to Budapest, a strategy viewed as “economical,” since filming in British or American studios would have been prohibitively expensive. Filming concluded in Budapest on 20 Nov 1990, according to Grant. Production notes state that a few additional days were spent shooting in London and Los Angeles. Production ended during the first week of Dec, marking five months since the start of principal photography.
       Accounts of the film’s budget varied greatly. A 12 Nov 1990 Var article reported that the picture, budgeted at $40 million, had gone over schedule and over budget, for an anticipated price tag of around $52 million. However, several contemporary sources speculated the picture cost at least $60 million, with articles in the 26 May 1991 LAT and 28 May 1991 HR suggesting that Tri-Star Pictures spent $70–$75 million on Hudson Hawk. However, producer Joel Silver and executive producer Robert Kraft maintained that the film strayed only a few million dollars over its projected budget.
       Hudson Hawk premiered in Los Angeles on 21 May 1991, and opened theatrically three days later. Critical reception was resoundingly negative, with a 24 May 1991 HR review describing the picture as a “relentlessly annoying,” “live-action Warner Bros. cartoon,” whose “stupidity quotient far outweighs the comedy.” On 29 May 1991, the LAT reported that the film earned only $7.1 million dollars in its opening weekend on 2,000 screens. A 4 Jun 1991 Wall Street Journal article noted that Hudson Hawk garnered $3.1 million its second weekend in release, a “catastrophe” for distributor Tri-Star Pictures. The WSJ conjectured that the only reason the film received a green light for development and production was to keep actor Bruce Willis involved with various studio projects. By the time cost overruns became apparent, it was too late to revoke the deal.
       End credits list the following additional production credits: “Cappuccino machines provided by Pasquini Espresso Co.; ‘The Gold Machine’ built by Enterprises Unlimited; ‘da Vinci’ gliders by AeroVironment Inc.; ‘Mr. Ed’ courtesy of Orion Television.” End credits also include the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks to Bill Blass Ltd.; Castello di San Leo, Italy; Cinecittà S.p.A.; Mail Rail; The New York City Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre and Broadcasting.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1987.
---
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1988.
---
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
23 May 1991.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 1991
p. 2, 13.
Daily Variety
30 Mar 1992.
---
Hollywood Drama-Logue
30 May--5 Jun 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1991
p. 10, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1991.
---
LAHExam
26 May 1989.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
27 May 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jun 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Mar 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Apr 1991
p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
19 May 1991
p. 20, 38-41, 44.
Los Angeles Times
24 May 1991
Calendar, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
29 May 1991.
---
New York
3 Jun 1991.
---
New York Times
24 May 1991
p. 8.
New York Times
26 May 1991
Section A, p. 9.
Newsweek
13 Aug 1990.
---
Reader
31 May 1991.
---
Screen International
5 May 1990.
---
Screen International
28 Jul 1990.
---
Screen International
29 Sep 1990.
---
Vanity Fair
Apr 1996.
---
Variety
25 Jul 1990.
---
Variety
12 Nov 1990
p. 1, 86.
Variety
27 May 1991
p. 77.
Variety
3 Jun 1991
p. 1, 77.
WSJ
4 Jun 1991.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Tri-Star Pictures presents
a Silver Pictures/Ace Bone production
a Michael Lehmann film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York unit
2d asst dir, New York unit
Asst unit prod mgr, New York unit
2d 2d asst dir, New York unit
DGA trainee, New York unit
Prod mgr, Rome unit
Asst dir, Rome unit
3d asst dir, Rome unit
Prod mgr, Budapest unit
Prod mgr, Budapest unit
Prod mgr, Budapest unit
Asst prod mgr, Budapest unit
Asst dir, Budapest unit
Unit prod mgr, Los Angeles unit
2d asst dir, Los Angeles unit
Unit mgr, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
Asst dir, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Video playback
Still photog
Cam asst, New York unit
Chief lighting tech, New York unit
Best boy, New York unit
Key grip, New York unit
Dolly grip, New York unit
Still photog, New York unit
Process projection, Rome unit
Chief lighting tech, Rome unit
Elec best boy, Rome unit
Key grip, Rome unit
Dolly grip, Rome unit
1st asst cam, Los Angeles unit
Steadicam op, Los Angeles unit
Process projection supv, Los Angeles unit
Process projection coord, Los Angeles unit
Process eng, Los Angeles unit
Process eng, Los Angeles unit
Chief lighting tech, Los Angeles unit
Elec best boy, Los Angeles unit
Key grip, Los Angeles unit
Dolly grip, Los Angeles unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
Cam op, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
Key grip, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Art dept coord
Art dir, New York unit
Art dir, Rome unit
Asst art dir, Rome unit
Asst art dir, Rome unit
Art dir, Budapest unit
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed
Asst film ed, Rome unit
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec, New York unit
Set dresser, New York unit
Prop master, New York unit
Chargeman scenic artist, New York unit
Const coord, New York unit
Set des, Rome unit
Set des, Rome unit
Set des, Rome unit
Set des, Rome unit
Set des, Rome unit
Leadman, Rome unit
Props, Rome unit
Props, Rome unit
Gold machine supv, Budapest unit
Gold machine crew, Budapest unit
Gold machine crew, Budapest unit
Gold machine crew, Budapest unit
Gold machine crew, Budapest unit
Gold machine crew, Budapest unit
Set dec, Los Angeles unit
Set dresser, Los Angeles unit
Set dressing coord, Los Angeles unit
Leadman, Los Angeles unit
Prop master, Los Angeles unit
Props, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
COSTUMES
Selected men's ward for "Hudson Hawk" by
Cost supv
Asst cost des
Ward, Rome unit
Ward, Rome unit
MUSIC
Mus/Orch cond by
Mus/Mus supv
Orch
Orch
Scoring mixer
Electronic mus programming/Mus mixes by
Electronic mus programming
Electronic mus programming/Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Addl re-rec mixer
Addl re-rec mixer
Machine op
Machine op
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, New York unit
Boom op, New York unit
Sd mixer, Los Angeles unit
Boom op, Los Angeles unit
Sd rec, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Sr eff tech
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff, New York unit
Spec eff, Rome unit
Spec eff, Budapest unit
Pyrotechnician, Budapest unit
Spec visual eff by
A division of LucasArts Entertainment Company
Visual eff supv, ILM
Visual eff prod, ILM
Opt photog supv, ILM
Visual eff plate supv, ILM
Post prod prod, ILM
Stage mgr, ILM
Digital supv, ILM
Eff cam supv, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Gaffer, ILM
Elec, ILM
Key rigger, ILM
Anim, ILM
Asst ed, ILM
Rotoscope supv, ILM
Rotoscope artist, ILM
Rotoscope artist, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Digital op, ILM
Digital op, ILM
Scanning op, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Visual eff and miniatures by
Supv of visual eff and miniatures, The Magic Camer
Prod, The Magic Camera Company
Art dir, The Magic Camera Company
Dir of photog, The Magic Camera Company
Cam op, The Magic Camera Company
Cam op, The Magic Camera Company
Cam op, The Magic Camera Company
Focus puller, The Magic Camera Company
Clapper loader, The Magic Camera Company
Chief elec, The Magic Camera Company
Sr model maker, The Magic Camera Company
Video computer graphics by
Titles des by
&
Titles des by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv/Spec makeup eff
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Spec makeup eff
Spec makeup eff
Hairstylist
Hairstylist to Bruce Willis
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod accountant
Pub coord
Scr supv
Casting assoc
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Lehmann
Asst to Mr. Willis
Asst to Mr. Silver
Asst to Mr. Dryhurst
Prod asst
Product placement
Armorer
Prod accountant, New York unit
Extras casting, New York unit
Transportation coord, New York unit
Prod accountant, Rome unit
Payroll accountant, Rome unit
Asst accountant, Rome unit
Loc mgr, Rome unit
Transportation capt, Rome unit
Prod office coord, Rome unit
Asst prod office coord, Rome unit
"Flying pictures" helicopter crew, Rome unit
"Flying pictures" helicopter crew, Rome unit
"Spacecam" crew, Rome unit
"Spacecam" crew, Rome unit
"Spacecam" crew, Rome unit
Dog trainer, Rome unit
Loc mgr, Budapest unit
Transportation capt, Budapest unit
Prod office coord, Budapest unit
Loc mgr, Los Angeles unit
Transportation coord, Los Angeles unit
Prod office coord, Los Angeles unit
Asst prod office coord, Los Angeles unit
Scr supv, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Asst to stunt coord
Stunt liaison, 2d unit - Rome, Budapest
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hudson Hawk Theme," written by Bruce Willis and Robert Kraft, produced by Robert Kraft and Michael Kamen, performed by Dr. John, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"Hudson Hawk Theme" (Instrumental), written by Bruce Willis and Robert Kraft, produced and performed by Robert Kraft
"Big Girls Don't Cry," written by Bob Crewe & Bob Gaudio
+
SONGS
"Hudson Hawk Theme," written by Bruce Willis and Robert Kraft, produced by Robert Kraft and Michael Kamen, performed by Dr. John, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"Hudson Hawk Theme" (Instrumental), written by Bruce Willis and Robert Kraft, produced and performed by Robert Kraft
"Big Girls Don't Cry," written by Bob Crewe & Bob Gaudio
"Body Heat," written by Deanna Brown, Deidra Brown & Yamma Brown, performed by James Brown, courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Hail To The Chief," from the motion picture soundtrack of "In Like Flint," arranged by Jerry Goldsmith, courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
"The Hokey Pokey," written by L. Laprise, C. Macak & T. Baker
"Mona Lisa," written by Jay Livingston & Ray Evans
"The Name Game," written by Lincoln Chase & Shirley Elliston
"The Power," written by Benito Benitez, John Garrett III & Toni C., performed by SNAP, courtesy of BMG Ariola Munich/Logic/Arista Records
"Side By Side," written by Harry Woods
"Swinging On A Star," written by Johnny Burke & James Van Heusen, performed by Bing Crosby, courtesy of MCA Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 May 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 21 May 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 May 1991
Production Date:
9 July--early December 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Tri-Star Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 July 1991
Copyright Number:
PA526219
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31162
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1481 Italy, Leonardo da Vinci builds a machine to turn lead into bronze. While testing the device, he discovers it can transform lead into gold. He quickly disassembles the machine’s key component, a star-shaped crystal, and breaks it into three pieces. The inventor then surveys the various projects in his workshop. Five hundred years later, in New York State, cat burglar Eddie “Hudson Hawk” Hawkins is released from prison. As he leaves, his corrupt parole officer offers him a job stealing a piece of art from an auction house. Hawk dismisses the request, saying he is a reformed man. He meets his old buddy, Tommy “Five-Tone” Messina, outside prison, and they drive into New York City. At Tommy’s bar, Hawk encounters Cesar and Antony Mario, two mafia associates who insist he steal the item from the auction house. Hawk is not interested in the job, but Cesar threatens to interfere with his parole, and the thief realizes he has no choice. Later, Tommy helps Hawk prepare for the heist. The two men break into the auction house, where they outwit the guards and escape with a statue. Later, Hawk delivers the artwork to the Mario brothers. A British man arrives and smashes the statue to pieces, revealing a crystal hidden inside. He pockets the sparkling fragment and bids farewell to an astonished Hawk, who returns to the bar to tell Tommy about the incident. Tommy shows Hawk the morning newspaper, with headlines announcing the “attempted” burglary of a statue sculpted by Leonardo da Vinci. Perplexed, Hawk decides to attend the auction, where he sits next to the beautiful Anna Baragli, an art authenticator from the Vatican. When Anna ... +


In 1481 Italy, Leonardo da Vinci builds a machine to turn lead into bronze. While testing the device, he discovers it can transform lead into gold. He quickly disassembles the machine’s key component, a star-shaped crystal, and breaks it into three pieces. The inventor then surveys the various projects in his workshop. Five hundred years later, in New York State, cat burglar Eddie “Hudson Hawk” Hawkins is released from prison. As he leaves, his corrupt parole officer offers him a job stealing a piece of art from an auction house. Hawk dismisses the request, saying he is a reformed man. He meets his old buddy, Tommy “Five-Tone” Messina, outside prison, and they drive into New York City. At Tommy’s bar, Hawk encounters Cesar and Antony Mario, two mafia associates who insist he steal the item from the auction house. Hawk is not interested in the job, but Cesar threatens to interfere with his parole, and the thief realizes he has no choice. Later, Tommy helps Hawk prepare for the heist. The two men break into the auction house, where they outwit the guards and escape with a statue. Later, Hawk delivers the artwork to the Mario brothers. A British man arrives and smashes the statue to pieces, revealing a crystal hidden inside. He pockets the sparkling fragment and bids farewell to an astonished Hawk, who returns to the bar to tell Tommy about the incident. Tommy shows Hawk the morning newspaper, with headlines announcing the “attempted” burglary of a statue sculpted by Leonardo da Vinci. Perplexed, Hawk decides to attend the auction, where he sits next to the beautiful Anna Baragli, an art authenticator from the Vatican. When Anna is called to examine the statue, Hawk notices her skepticism and is surprised when she confirms its provenance. Bidding begins, and two rich art collectors, Darwin and Minerva Mayflower, offer a $100 million for the piece. The auctioneer strikes the gavel, triggering an explosion. Hawk attempts to rescue Anna but is knocked unconscious by falling debris. He awakens in the back of an ambulance, where Cesar and Antony Mario threaten him at gunpoint. Hawk escapes on a gurney, which he steers through lanes of traffic. When the gurney rolls to a stop, four eccentric individuals surround him, introducing themselves as associates of master criminal, George Kaplan. When Kaplan steps out of the shadows, Hawk lunges at him, remembering how the corrupt Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.) agent hired him to do a job, but set him up and sent him to prison. Kaplan laughs at the vengeful Hawk and informs the thief of a new assignment. Hawk protests, but Kaplan knocks him unconscious. The cat burglar awakens in Rome, Italy, where he is escorted into a limousine and meets Darwin Mayflower, the man from the art auction. Darwin proclaims himself a “villain” and announces his goal to dominate the world. At Mayflower corporate headquarters, Minerva Mayflower tasks Hawk with stealing Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook, “the Codex,” from the Vatican museum. A reluctant Hawk goes to the Vatican, where he makes notes about access points and escape routes. In the room containing the Codex, Anna Baragli lectures to a group of tourists. Hawk flirts with her, before grabbing a child’s toy and throwing it near the glass-encased notebook, triggering the security system. As smoke fills the room, Anna pulls Hawk into a secret passageway and demands to know what he is plotting. Hawk deflects her questions by asking her to dinner. She agrees, but when he leaves, she reveals herself to be a nun, working on behalf of the Vatican to protect the museum’s treasures. She reports Hawk’s activities to a cardinal. Meanwhile, Hawk makes a phone call to Tommy, unaware that his friend is already in Rome and hobnobbing with the Mayflowers. Just then, Hawk is intercepted by George Kaplan and his four associates. They insist the heist take place that night. Later, using the Vatican’s underground “mail rail,” Hawk infiltrates the museum and steals da Vinci’s notebook in time to keep his date with Anna. At dinner, Hawk reveals he spent time in prison, and Anna confesses she is attracted to “sinners.” They cut their dinner short and return to Hawk’s room, where they kiss passionately. However, their tryst is interrupted when Anna finds the Codex in Hawk’s knapsack. Angered, she asks if he is working with the Mayflowers to acquire da Vinci masterpieces. Hawk professes ignorance about the objects he has stolen, saying Kaplan and the Mayflowers hired him because he is an expert burglar. Anna puts a drug in Hawk’s cappuccino, and he passes out. When Kaplan’s associates break into the room, Anna demands to meet their boss. At a castle in the Italian countryside, Kaplan reassures Anna that he still works for the C.I.A. He claims to have convinced the Mayflowers otherwise, and reveals his plan to arrest them when they attempt to acquire the Codex from him. Anna is appeased, but as she leaves, she sees the Mayflower’s dog, and begins to doubt Kaplan’s story. She reports to the cardinal that Kaplan is working for the Mayflowers against the Vatican. Back at Mayflower corporate headquarters, Darwin and Minerva explain to Hawk that they are searching for the crystals to make da Vinci’s “gold machine” operational. They only need to obtain the last piece, which is hidden in a small “flying machine” scheduled to be on display at the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. Hawk refuses to be involved, but the Mayflowers bring Tommy Five-Tone into the room to coerce the unwilling burglar. Alone with Hawk, Tommy says he regrets double-crossing his friend. A fight ensues, and the two men fall out the window onto the street, where Tommy is shot in the chest. Kaplan and the Mayflowers watch in disbelief as a police van whisks the thieves away. The police van stops at the Roman Forum, and Hawk and Tommy emerge, unharmed. Anna greets them, and they all agree that without Hawk to steal the flying machine, the Mayflowers’ plans are foiled. Satisfied, they retire for the evening. In the morning, Hawk and Tommy are rudely awakened by George Kaplan and his associates. Kaplan paralyzes the men with a dart gun, before showing them the flying machine, which one of his associates stole from the Louvre. The C.I.A. agent removes a crystal hidden inside the contraption, laughing maniacally as he leaves the two burglars with a ticking bomb. At the Italian castle, Kaplan and the Mayflowers hold Anna hostage, demanding that she translate instructions for putting the crystal back together. Kaplan hears a noise and goes outside to investigate. He is confronted by Hawk, and a fight ensues. Meanwhile, Tommy intercepts Darwin Mayflower in the limousine, but the villain traps him inside, and the car careens over a cliff. Thwarted, Hawk and Anna are forced to help the Mayflowers. Hawk assembles the crystal pieces, which Minerva uses to start the gold machine, but because the cat burglar intentionally omitted one of the fragments, the machine explodes, killing Minerva and Darwin. As the castle falls in pieces around them, Hawk spies a fifteenth century hang glider, and he and Anna soar to a small town in the valley below. There, they profess their love for each other, before lamenting the death of Tommy Five-Tone. Just then, the disheveled Tommy Five-Tone appears, saying he was rescued by the car’s airbags. The three friends stop at a cafe and drink cappuccinos, pleased with the outcome of their caper. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.