Mannequin Two: On the Move (1991)

PG | 94 mins | Romantic comedy, Fantasy | 17 May 1991

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HISTORY

Principal photography began on 23 Apr 1990 in Philadelphia, PA, according to the 15 May 1990 HR, which referred to the film as Mannequin on the Move. The 4 May 1990 HR reported an anticipated eight weeks of filming in Philadelphia, with would bring in an estimated $2.5 million to the local economy. As stated in the 6 July 1990 HR, the primary location was Wanamaker’s department store in “Center City” Philadelphia, with several store employees appearing as background actors. Other locations included Philadelphia International Airport and Wissahickon Park. Mayor Wilson Goode presented the production team with miniature replicas of the Liberty Bell, the Philadelphia equivalent of a “key to the city.”
       Nine months later, the 27 Mar 1991 HR announced 20th Century Fox Pictures as the film’s distributor. The picture opened on 17 May 1991 to generally negative reviews.
       According to a news item nearly two years after the film’s release, the 5 Apr 1993 Var reported a legal battle between 20th Century Fox and Gladden Entertainment. Fox was seeking seeking $4,514,875 in lost revenue, citing their 17 Dec 1990 distribution agreement with Gladden, who was required to reimburse the distributors for “any ‘guaranteed shortfall’ calculated 15 months after the film’s release by projecting the film’s ultimate gross receipts and costs.” Gladden and financier Bruce McNall countersued, alleging their participation in the deal was coerced by Fox, who threatened to cancel a previous ten-film distribution agreement with Gladden. Although Gladden reduced Fox’s obligation to nine films, the company was “forced” to produce Mannequin Two: On the Move as its tenth release to satisfy ... More Less

Principal photography began on 23 Apr 1990 in Philadelphia, PA, according to the 15 May 1990 HR, which referred to the film as Mannequin on the Move. The 4 May 1990 HR reported an anticipated eight weeks of filming in Philadelphia, with would bring in an estimated $2.5 million to the local economy. As stated in the 6 July 1990 HR, the primary location was Wanamaker’s department store in “Center City” Philadelphia, with several store employees appearing as background actors. Other locations included Philadelphia International Airport and Wissahickon Park. Mayor Wilson Goode presented the production team with miniature replicas of the Liberty Bell, the Philadelphia equivalent of a “key to the city.”
       Nine months later, the 27 Mar 1991 HR announced 20th Century Fox Pictures as the film’s distributor. The picture opened on 17 May 1991 to generally negative reviews.
       According to a news item nearly two years after the film’s release, the 5 Apr 1993 Var reported a legal battle between 20th Century Fox and Gladden Entertainment. Fox was seeking seeking $4,514,875 in lost revenue, citing their 17 Dec 1990 distribution agreement with Gladden, who was required to reimburse the distributors for “any ‘guaranteed shortfall’ calculated 15 months after the film’s release by projecting the film’s ultimate gross receipts and costs.” Gladden and financier Bruce McNall countersued, alleging their participation in the deal was coerced by Fox, who threatened to cancel a previous ten-film distribution agreement with Gladden. Although Gladden reduced Fox’s obligation to nine films, the company was “forced” to produce Mannequin Two: On the Move as its tenth release to satisfy “foreign distribution and financing agreements.” The following year, the 7 Apr 1994 HR stated that Gladden owed over $4.1 million in residuals to the actors, writers, and directorial staff who participated in the film, prompting the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the Directors Guild of America (DGA), and the Writers Guild of America (WGA) to file an ”involuntary bankruptcy proceeding” against the company. An advertisement in the 25 Apr 1995 HR announced the 1 Jun 1995 liquidation sale of Gladden’s assets, including “Mannequin II,” by Credit Lyonnais Bank Nederland N.V.
       End credits include the following statements: “Filmed on location in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,” and, “The producers wish to thank: Teamster Local 107, Philadelphia, Joseph Cimino, Jr., President; the management and staff of John Wanamaker, Philadelphia; Philadelphia Film Office, City of Philadelphia, W. Wilson Goode, Mayor; Philadelphia Police – Officer Mike Sternel, coordinator, Lt. Jack Snell – Marine Unit; University of Pennsylvania, Wharton-Sinkler Conference Center and Morris Arboretum; Browning-Ferris Industries, Valley Forge District; Jansport; Pepsi-Cola Company; Yves Saint Laurent Parfums Corporation; Abydos Couture.”
       The name of music producer Phil Bonanno is misspelled as "Bonnano" in end credits. Stuntperson Mark DeAllessandro's name is misspelled as “DeAllensandro." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1991
p. 9, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1994
p. 1, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1995.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 May 1991
p. 8.
New York Times
19 May 1991
p. 50.
Variety
27 May 1991
pp. 77-78.
Variety
5 Apr 1993.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Featuring:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Gladden Entertainment Presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
Still photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video interlock
Video interlock, Sync Lock Video
Grip and lighting equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Post-prod supv
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Mannequins sculpted by
Set dec
Leadman
Key set dresser
Matte paintings by
Matte paintings by Illusion Arts Inc.
Matte paintings by Illusion Arts Inc.
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Head scenic artist
Lead scenic artist
"Western Flyer" painting by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward asst
Jessie's necklace by
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus supv
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Boom op
Cableman
Sd ed supv
Sd facility mgr
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff best boy
Spec eff asst
Spec vis eff
Spec vis eff, Max W. Anderson for
Optical supv
Title des by
Title des by
Titles and opticals by
DANCE
Dance choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Key hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
Key makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Harding
Asst to Mr. Foreman
Scr supv
Unit pub
Animal wrangler
Philadelphia casting
Casting - New York
Casting asst
Asst prod accountant
Post-prod accounting
Post-prod accounting, Prep Shot Post
Asst prod coord
Asst loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Dept store coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Loc projectionist
Craft service/First aid
Public relations rep (U.S. and Canada)
Public relations rep (international)
Insurance provided by
Completion bond by
Financial consultant
Financial consultant, Frans J. Afman
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
ANIMATION
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Edward Rugoff and Michael Gottlieb.
SONGS
“Can't Believe My Eyes,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Jon Lind, words & music by John Bettis & Jon Lind
“Do It For Love,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Phil Galdston & John Van Tongeren, words & music by John Van Tongeren & Phil Galdston
“Wake Up,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Phil Galdston & John Van Tongeren, words & music by John Van Tongeren & Phil Galdston, “Pick Up The Pieces To My Heart,” performed by Cindy Valentine, produced by Tony Green for TGO Records, Ltd., courtesy of Artists Records, Inc., words & music by Cindy Valentine & Tony Green
+
SONGS
“Can't Believe My Eyes,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Jon Lind, words & music by John Bettis & Jon Lind
“Do It For Love,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Phil Galdston & John Van Tongeren, words & music by John Van Tongeren & Phil Galdston
“Wake Up,” performed by Gene Miller, produced by Phil Galdston & John Van Tongeren, words & music by John Van Tongeren & Phil Galdston, “Pick Up The Pieces To My Heart,” performed by Cindy Valentine, produced by Tony Green for TGO Records, Ltd., courtesy of Artists Records, Inc., words & music by Cindy Valentine & Tony Green
“Casa De Coati,” performed by Meshach Taylor & Coati Mundi, produced by Coati Mundi, words & music by Coati Mundi
“The Sea Hawk,” by Erich Wolfgang Korngold
“Feel The Way That I Do,” performed by Shoes, produced by Shoes, courtesy of Black Vinyl Records, words & music by John Murphy
“That Love Thang,” performed by E.I.E.I.O., produced by Phil Bonanno & E.I.E.I.O., courtesy of Frontier Records, words & music by Richard Szeluga & David Kendrick
“Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now,” performed by Jefferson Starship, produced by Narada Michael Walden, courtesy of RCA Records, words & music by Albert Hammond & Diane Warren.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Mannequin on the Move
Mannequin II
Mannequin: On the Move
Release Date:
17 May 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 May 1991
Production Date:
23 April--mid June 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Gladden Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
1 May 1991
Copyright Number:
PA515942
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30673
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In tenth-century Bavaria, Prince William of Hauptman-Koenig attempts to elope with a peasant girl named Jessie. The queen and her sorcerer, Gunther Spretzle, thwart William’s plan by giving Jessie a gold necklace that turns her into a mannequin. The spell will be broken after 1,000 years, or when Jessie “meets her true love from another land.” Prince William responds by cursing Hauptman-Koenig with perpetual rain. Nearly 1,000 years later, Jessie is displayed at the national museum as “The Enchanted Peasant Girl,” although her story is dismissed as a folk legend. The sorcerer, now known as Count Spretzle, has survived the centuries, anticipating Jessie’s return to life so they can be married. Count Spretzle travels with Jessie and the crown jewels on a tour of the United States. Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jason Williams, a direct descendent of Prince William, begins his first day at the Prince and Company department store, where he is tasked to assist the flamboyant “manager of visual merchandising,” Hollywood Montrose, in creating a presentation for the Hauptman-Koenig exhibit. Moments after they meet, Hollywood and Jason are notified that the van carrying the exhibit is teetering on a bridge above the Schuykill River. They arrive as Jessie falls into the river, and Jason jumps in to rescue her, along with Spretzle’s muscular assistants, Rolf, Egon, and Arnold. Although Jason is embarrassed to learn that he risked his life for a mannequin, he is entranced by her beauty. Upon returning to the store, Jason places Jessie in a storage room, and when he removes her necklace to examine it, she returns to life. Jessie is ... +


In tenth-century Bavaria, Prince William of Hauptman-Koenig attempts to elope with a peasant girl named Jessie. The queen and her sorcerer, Gunther Spretzle, thwart William’s plan by giving Jessie a gold necklace that turns her into a mannequin. The spell will be broken after 1,000 years, or when Jessie “meets her true love from another land.” Prince William responds by cursing Hauptman-Koenig with perpetual rain. Nearly 1,000 years later, Jessie is displayed at the national museum as “The Enchanted Peasant Girl,” although her story is dismissed as a folk legend. The sorcerer, now known as Count Spretzle, has survived the centuries, anticipating Jessie’s return to life so they can be married. Count Spretzle travels with Jessie and the crown jewels on a tour of the United States. Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jason Williams, a direct descendent of Prince William, begins his first day at the Prince and Company department store, where he is tasked to assist the flamboyant “manager of visual merchandising,” Hollywood Montrose, in creating a presentation for the Hauptman-Koenig exhibit. Moments after they meet, Hollywood and Jason are notified that the van carrying the exhibit is teetering on a bridge above the Schuykill River. They arrive as Jessie falls into the river, and Jason jumps in to rescue her, along with Spretzle’s muscular assistants, Rolf, Egon, and Arnold. Although Jason is embarrassed to learn that he risked his life for a mannequin, he is entranced by her beauty. Upon returning to the store, Jason places Jessie in a storage room, and when he removes her necklace to examine it, she returns to life. Jessie is shocked to learn she has been frozen for nearly ten centuries, but she is happy to be reunited with Jason, whom she believes is the reincarnation of Prince William. They spend the evening together, during which Jessie discovers automobile travel, cheesesteak sandwiches, and disco dancing. Meanwhile, Hollywood and the store manager, Mr. James, meet Count Spretzle, who claims the exhibit is intended to attract tourism to his beleaguered country. In reality, he and his three minions plan to steal the crown jewels and escape to Bermuda with Jessie. Later that evening, Jason brings Jessie to his mother’s home, and sleeps on the couch while she stays in his bedroom. In the morning, Jessie unwittingly dons her necklace and becomes inanimate. Jason’s mother finds her son trying to revive Jessie, and accuses him of having “a fetish for a dummy.” Later, Jason presents Jessie as a mannequin to Count Spretzle, who is outraged at seeing her dressed in modern clothes. The count glares suspiciously at Jason, certain they have met before. When he is alone in the storage room, Hollywood borrows Jessie’s necklace, turning himself into a mannequin and restoring her to life. Rolf, Egon, and Arnold remove the necklace from Hollywood and notify Count Spretzle that Jessie has escaped. When Jason learns that Jessie is alive, he searches the store for her. Count Spretzle recognizes Jason as his nemesis, Prince William, and attempts to kill him with a crossbow, but Jessie comes to her lover’s rescue in an electric go-cart. After they return home, police arrest Jason for stealing Jessie, while Count Spretzle transforms her back into a mannequin. In the morning, Hollywood disguises himself as a soldier and orders Jason’s release from jail, claiming the young man is a military deserter. They return to Prince & Company for the televised presentation of the Hauptmann-Koenig artifacts, with Jason posing as a cameraman to avoid detection. Count Spretzle takes offense at the gaudy presentation and attempts to leave with Jessie. However, Jason challenges him to a duel, aided by Hollywood, who uses stage effects to hinder the count. The audience applauds as Jason removes the necklace, restoring Jessie to life. Count Spretzle draws a pistol and takes Jessie to the roof, where he expects a waiting helicopter. However, the count’s minions surprise him with a hot-air balloon, believing it to be more “romantic.” As the balloon begins its ascent, Jason grabs onto the mooring line and pulls himself into the basket. During the ensuing struggle, Jessie places the necklace on Count Spretzle, rendering him inanimate for 1,000 years. He falls from the balloon and shatters on the street. After being crudely reassembled by Rolf, Egon, and Arnold, the count is put on display at the Hauptmann-Koenig museum. In time, Jessie and Jason marry, with Hollywood’s pink convertible serving as their bridal limousine. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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